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Catholic Publisher Accidentally Uses Angel Moroni on Hymnal Cover


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Here:

Quote

CATHOLIC HYMNALS SCRUB MORMON ICON

2020-08-26-Moroni.jpg

by Jules Gomes  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  August 26, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. (ChurchMilitant.com) - A controversial Catholic publisher has apologized after a fierce backlash over its use of a Mormon image for its hymnbook covers.

Oregon Catholic Press (OCP), currently embroiled in an antitrust lawsuit, used on the cover of two of its hymn publications — Today's Missal Music Issue 2021 and Respond & Acclaim — a picture of the "angel" Moroni created by ex-Catholic Mormon artist Jorge Cocco Santángelo.

The painting depicts the Mormon angel standing on a golden globe, blowing a trumpet and holding a box or book of gold.

Adherents of the Mormon Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) place a statue of Moroni blowing a trumpet atop many of their temples as a symbol of the mission of to preach their gospel to the world.

Sounding the Alarm

Father Robert Badger, a priest of the diocese of Gallup, who converted from Mormonism in 1993, was one of the first to sound the alarm on OCP's portrayal of Moroni.

"Speaking as a former Mormon, if this is what the Music Issue is going to look like next year, this offers me an excellent reason to sever our relationships with @OCPmusic," Badger tweeted Monday.

"It's not a joke. @OCPMusic really is putting one of the pre-eminent symbols of Mormonism on the Music Issue," he reiterated.

Badger's tweets were closely followed by Fr. Cory Sticha, pastor of Sacred Heart in Cascade and St. Ann's in Fort Shaw, who asked OCP to "recall" the hymnbooks "immediately."

"This is not compatible with Catholicism in any way and is highly inappropriate for a Catholic publisher to place in Catholic parishes," Sticha tweeted.
...
At first, OCP defended its stance. "Great care goes into choosing the art for our missals," it said in a statement, contending that "third-party retail sites have erroneously labeled this image as something other than what it is."

"The original artist named this piece 'Angel VIII' and can be viewed on the artist's official website here. This particular piece was chosen for its beauty and, since it was for our beloved Music Issue, for its musical element/theme (the angel playing a horn)."
...
Finally, OCP issued a second statement offering a groveling apology: "Upon further reflection, we should have done more research, and we apologize for this embarrassing mistake. We would never knowingly use an image that is not authentically Catholic on our publications."

"We are working to finalize a plan to make things right for our customers and to ensure this never happens again," it said.

The article goes on.  Apparently this created quite a bit of anger. 

The story is published on "ChurchMilitant.com."  Sure sounds like it.

I hope our Catholic friends can assuage their anger.

Thanks,

-Smac

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Yeah that's right.  Any depiction of any angel blowing on a trumpet is a depiction of Moroni.  We have the trademark on that now.  Resistance to the idea is absolutely futile.

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8 minutes ago, 2BizE said:

So, the Mormons aren’t the only ones to give Moroni the boot...

Mormons haven't given Moroni any boot.  He is represented as flying through the heavens in his bare feet.

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I think this is one of those things where ignorance is bliss. 

For those in the know, however, I can see how this would rub them the wrong way.

And, honestly, I can kind of understand / relate:

I remember sitting in a doctor's waiting room once. He had a very large canvas print on the wall. It was quite nice, and had something of a Renaissance look about it. 

Curiously, it looked familiar to me.

I have never taken a single art or art history class in my life, so I assumed it must have been something famous - though nothing was coming to mind. 

Finally it came to me: while I had never studied art in any of my schooling, I had managed to take enough classes to earn a philosophy minor back when I was in college.

I pulled out my smartphone to look it up and, sure enough, there it was: The Death of Socrates

What seemed like just a nice, old painting originally, suddenly became...a really strange thing to be finding in your doctor's office.

I mean, maybe it wouldn't be out of place if your doctor happened to be Jack Kevorkian, but for a regular doctor - yeah, it didn't really fit (and was more than a little bit weird). 

And once you know something, you can't just un-know it.  

In fact, I couldn't keep myself from asking about it. When the doctor came in to finish my exam, I asked him if the painting in the waiting room was meant to be ironic or something. 

He had no idea what I was talking about (apparently, he just thought it was a nice, old looking painting himself back when he bought it).

I told him that I thought it was strange to find a wall-sized canvas print of a guy about to commit suicide in a doctor's office, so I was wondering if it was meant to be ironic - or if maybe there was some other reason he chose to display that particular piece (e.g., maybe he was into philosophy too). 

He was rather off-put by the question, dodged it, and then excused himself saying I was good to go.

As soon as he left the room the senior nurse, who had been present the whole time, broke out into the biggest silent laugh I have ever seen in my life. She said that I had absolutely made her year. Apparently that particular doctor had a reputation among the nurses as being kind of a jerk, and she couldn't wait to tell all the other nurses how he had been made to look a fool (he had apparently gone on to all of them about how much money he had spent on that painting, and now he was probably going to have to get rid of it). Oh well, such is life.

Anyway, back to the OP, I can see how an informed Catholic might find it...inappropriate to discover a (clearly recognizable) symbol from a heretical faith on the front cover of their hymnal. 

Everyone else might just think it's a nice picture, but those who know won't be able to un-see the angel Moroni every time they pick it up.

It holds a different meaning to them - one which understandably would be distracting to them during their time of worship. 

 

Edited by Amulek
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4 hours ago, smac97 said:

Here:

The article goes on.  Apparently this created quite a bit of anger. 

The story is published on "ChurchMilitant.com."  Sure sounds like it.

I hope our Catholic friends can assuage their anger.

Thanks,

-Smac

Actually this is the statue to compare it to. Pretty much identical.

moroni.jpg.8276d5dad9e8735dbca1834f3e6d8d99.jpg

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3 hours ago, 2BizE said:

So, the Mormons aren’t the only ones to give Moroni the boot...

Nature started it.  Poor Moroni has had it rough lately.

image.jpeg.c34382792da9b6178d1bb4b0e172922a.jpeg

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2020-08-26-Moroni.jpg

Can I just say, I love this painting!

How appropriate that it was painted by a "Sanangelo" (Saint angel)!

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I love his work. Iirc, I saw a number of his paintings in the online art collection. 
 

I am thinking of buying this for Christmas...and I don’t generally like religious art in my home except for a very few artists.  Don’t mind it in museums and love it for lessons, just seeing it day after day it has to keep me feeling passionate about it to keep it as also feeling sacred. 
 

https://history.churchofjesuschrist.org/exhibit/museum-art-catalog-topic?lang=eng#mv162

Edited by Calm
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1 hour ago, 3DOP said:

On reflection, I tend to think the Moroni/Oregon Catholic Publishing combination makes a reasonably good fit as to what one ought to expect were they to judge this purportedly Catholic book by its cover. I am guessing about my fellow Catholics and LDS here, but I have a hunch that Latter-day Saints would be more at home with what OCP publishes as religious music than would Damien, Spammer, Miserere, and 3DOP.   

3DOP

 

Exactly what kind of music do they publish; my curiosity has been piqued?  

Our hymnal has changed a bit since I was a boy. I miss many of the hymns no longer found in our hymnals and many of the ones that are there I would rather that I never heard them again. We each have our preferences. 

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5 hours ago, smac97 said:

Here:

The article goes on.  Apparently this created quite a bit of anger. 

The story is published on "ChurchMilitant.com."  Sure sounds like it.

I hope our Catholic friends can assuage their anger.

Thanks,

-Smac

Church Militant is a cesspool of vipers. 

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45 minutes ago, bluebell said:

I get why Catholics aren't excited about this and want it changed, but the quote--

"This is not compatible with Catholicism in any way and is highly inappropriate for a Catholic publisher to place in Catholic parishes," Sticha tweeted.

Seems a lot overly dramatic.  It's an angel on a ball with a trumpet.  If Catholics believe in the book of Revelation then this picture is not not compatible with Catholicism in any way, even though it makes sense that they wouldn't want a "mormon" image on their hymnbooks.

Calm posted an article from the Catholic News Agency on this story in the Social forum (here), and in the article she posted, the publisher is quoted as saying:

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“The sounding of the trumpet at the last is a strong traditional Christian image. We chose this angel because he’s holding a trumpet and what looks like the book that will be opened at the last,” said Oregon Catholic Press

That's how the publisher viewed it.  So the painting can be viewed as a "strong traditional Christian image", which it is even from a Latter-day Saints point of view (but it's not some generic "book" in our case).  :) 

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29 minutes ago, Storm Rider said:

Exactly what kind of music do they publish; my curiosity has been piqued?  

Our hymnal has changed a bit since I was a boy. I miss many of the hymns no longer found in our hymnals and many of the ones that are there I would rather that I never heard them again. We each have our preferences. 

I bet you can get the publisher to sell the entire lot of them at a great price.  Would make for a great conversation starter as a coffee table book, and like stamps or other items with unique flaws, would likely appreciate in value over time.

i may be talking myself into making an offer. 😀

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Catholic publisher makes second apology over Mormon cover art

Washington, D.C. Newsroom, Aug 25, 2020 / 04:01 pm MT (CNA).- A Catholic publishing company has apologized for its use of a Mormon angel on the cover of two Catholic publications, and is determining how best to move forward.

“Dear Partners in Ministry, we have heard your concerns, we admit our error and we apologize for the cover art on the 2021 Respond & Acclaim and Music Issue,” said a statement from Oregon Catholic Press published Aug. 25.

Oregon Catholic Press said they were “unaware of the association with the Mormon angel Moroni,” and that “we should have done more research”.

“We apologize for this embarrassing mistake,” they said, adding that they would “never knowingly use an image that is not authentically Catholic on our publications.” 

The image in question, which was published under the titles “Angel VIII” and “Angel Moroni,” was painted in 2017 by Argentinian artist Jorge Cocco Santangelo. Santangelo was raised Catholic but abandoned the faith in 1962 after meeting Mormon missionaries.

The image depicts the Angel Moroni standing on a golden sphere, blowing a horn and carrying golden tablets.

“We are working to finalize a plan to make things right for our customers and to ensure this never happens again,” said the publishing company, adding that once a plan is determined, they will reach out to those who had ordered the books.

Tuesday’s apology is a reversal of a message shared by Oregon Catholic Press on Monday evening, when they claimed that the angel on the cover of the books was simply an unspecified angel. The painting, they said, had been “erroneously labeled” by other websites as being of Angel Moroni. Cocco Santangelo, Oregon Catholic Press said in the original statement, had denied that the angel in the painting was anyone in particular.

This claim was called into question when it was revealed that Santangelo had shared an image of the painting on his Instagram page this past April, both titling it as “Angel Moroni” and stating that the entire “Angel” series was mostly centered on Angel Moroni.

The LDS Church teaches that Moroni is the angel referenced in Revelation 14:6, and that Moroni appeared to Joseph Smith to reveal the location of the Book of Mormon.

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13 hours ago, bluebell said:

I get why Catholics aren't excited about this and want it changed, but the quote--

"This is not compatible with Catholicism in any way and is highly inappropriate for a Catholic publisher to place in Catholic parishes," Sticha tweeted.

Seems a lot overly dramatic.  It's an angel on a ball with a trumpet.  If Catholics believe in the book of Revelation then this picture is not not compatible with Catholicism in any way, even though it makes sense that they wouldn't want a "mormon" image on their hymnbooks.

If it were just a random picture of an angel with a trumpet and book, that would be one thing. But in this case the artist has identified the angel as being a specific angel: the angel Moroni. 

If Catholicism is true (which is presumably the position from which those making these statements are coming from) then the angel Moroni is an 'angel of light' (i.e., a devil in disguise). 

As such, I can understand the feeling that having one of Satan's minions depicted on your hymnal is "not compatible" with your Christian faith; and that finding such a depiction in your place of worship would, in fact, be "highly inappropriate."

 

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, 2BizE said:

I’m simply suggesting, as others on this board have noted, that a new trend seems to be fewer temples have Moroni on top....

https://www.mormondialogue.org/topic/72788-new-symbol-to-identify-the-church/page/4/?tab=comments#comment-1209968043

I'm quite fine with that.  This iconography is not doctrinally required.  I sometimes get concerned that we elevate things to "doctrine" when they oughtn't be so elevated.

Meanwhile, here's an additional news item about this story:

Quote

A scandalette erupted over the past few days with the release of Oregon Catholic Press’s 2021 hymnal.  The scandal is not, for once, of a lyrical or musical nature; the eyebrow-raising issue is the cover art.  It portrays a blond, white-robed figure standing on a glob, blowing a trumpet, and carrying a golden book—an angel?

The figure is currently labeled on the artist’s website as “Angel VIII (2017).”  But it’s more complicated than that, because another angel in the series is called “Angel Moroni (2018)”.  Complicating matters further, an Instagram account associated with the artist, Jorge Cocco, identifies the OCP image (and “Most of the angels in this collection”) as “different versions of the angel known as Moroni” (h/t Father Matthew Schneider and Deacon Greg Kandra).  OCP, however, initially stated on Facebook that while they understand Mormons seeing it as Moroni, they “saw a beautiful image of an angel, and nothing more.”  They took it as an image of the last day, and, “[t]o ensure this didn’t conflict with the original intent of the art,” they “consulted with the artist. He stated, ‘This angel does not have a name, it is left to the interpretation of the viewer.’”

It’s hard to know the artist’s intention in this particular case, since he seems to have two different stories about who the angel is.  Not surprisingly, OCP at first decided that the artist’s intention (or lack thereof) was irrelevant—a position which is, from an academic viewpoint, arguably correct.  What they offered concerned customers was, essentially, reader-response theory.

The issue here, I think, is that the Latter-day Saint identification of Moroni as an angel is ultimately derived from the Bible.  From the Encyclopedia of Mormonism:

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Moroni is frequently identified with the Church because portrayals of him blowing a trumpet, handling the gold plates, or instructing Joseph Smith are commonly displayed-for instance on LDS temple spires, on covers of several printings of the Book of Mormon, and in paintings. A depiction of Moroni with a trumpet is the official emblem on grave markers of American Mormon servicemen.

Moroni is commonly portrayed with a trumpet because of an interpretation of a prophecy of John the Revelator wherein he saw an angel heralding the return of the everlasting gospel to the earth in the last days: And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people, saying with a loud voice, Fear God, and give glory to him; for the hour of his judgment is come: and worship him that made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters {Rev. 14:6-7}. {See also Angel Moroni Statue.}

And here:

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Moroni was the last in a line of prophet-leaders in the Western Hemisphere whose history is recorded in the Book of Mormon. Latter-day Saints believe John the Revelator foretold Moroni's angelic ministry: "And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people" (Rev. 14:6).

Because Moroni's mission was vital to the restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ and the establishment of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a statue of Moroni as a herald sounding a trumpet has been placed on several Latter-day Saint temples (e.g., Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.).

In other words, the iconography of "{an} angel fly{ing} in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth," is not so much specifically and exclusively  "Latter-day Saint" or "Catholic" as it is biblical.  It's right there in Rev. 14.

Nevertheless, the iconography here becomes more Latter-day Saint-ish because the angel in this depiction A) is carrying a "book" (to denote "having the everlasting gospel...," and the Gold Plates / Book of Mormon), B) does not have wings (a generalized feature in popular Catholic/Protestant iconography, but pretty much universally excluded in Latter-day Saint iconography), and C) was created by a Latter-day Saint artist (who was clearly drawing on the Latter-day Saint connection of Moroni to the angel in Rev. 14).

Not all depictions of Moroni-as-the-angel-referenced-in-Rev.-14 show him with the book/plates.  In fact, including the plates in iconography is quite the exception, not the rule.  Arguably the most famous depiction of Moroni, the statue adorning the Salt Lake Temple, doesn't have it:

media:02ccbcbf5a7847b4a833a753f19f6acdVi

In fact, the depiction of Moroni holding the plates was not apparently introduced to temple iconography until . . . 1951, with the L.A. Temple:

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Second-Moroni-Milard-Malin-Los-Ancgeles-
...
This is also the first of two statues to be created for use on top of temples where the statue is holding Gold Plates in the crook of his left arm, the first of only two statue models in use to do so.

The inclusion of plates as part of the iconography is the exception, not the rule.  From the Church's website:

Quote

Only five temples feature an angel Moroni statue holding the gold plates. They are the Los Angeles California Temple, Washington D.C. Temple, Seattle Washington Temple, Jordan River Utah Temple, and Mexico City Mexico Temple.

The plates are included in the Hill Cumorah statue:

SIA1737.jpg

Thanks,

-Smac

Edited by smac97
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I also wanted to include a few additional excerpts from the link in my previous post:

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With all due respect to our Mormon friends and allies, from the Catholic perspective, there is a real and nontrivial chance that “the angel known as Moroni,” if such a being was real, was a bad actor.  And that is why, whatever reader-response theory might say, if “Angel VIII” really did represent Moroni in the mind of the artist when he created the image, a Catholic would be uncomfortable staring down at “Angel VIII” five times a Sunday morning until the end of 2021.

I can appreciate this perspective.

Thanks,

-Smac

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, 2BizE said:

I’m simply suggesting, as others on this board have noted, that a new trend seems to be fewer temples have Moroni on top....

https://www.mormondialogue.org/topic/72788-new-symbol-to-identify-the-church/page/4/?tab=comments#comment-1209968043

From the Church's website (emphases added) :

Quote
  1. There are 34 temples that do not have an angel Moroni statue. They are the St. George Utah Temple, Logan Utah Temple, Manti Utah Temple, Laie Hawaii Temple, Cardston Alberta Temple, Mesa Arizona Temple, Hamilton New Zealand Temple, Oakland California Temple, Hong Kong China Temple, Paris France Temple, Kinshasa Democratic Republic of the Congo Temple, Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple, Yigo Guam Temple, Praia Cabo Verde Temple, San Juan Puerto Rico Temple, Bangkok Thailand Temple, Auckland New Zealand Temple, Alabang Philippines Temple, Lima Peru Los Olivos Temple, Orem Utah Temple, San Pedro Sula Honduras Temple, Brasília Brazil Temple, Taylorsville Utah Temple, Tooele Valley Utah Temple, Moses Lake Washington Temple, Phnom Penh Cambodia Temple, McAllen Texas Temple, Bengaluru India Temple, Bentonville Arkansas Temple, Cobán Guatemala Temple, Okinawa Japan Temple, Mendoza Argentina Temple, Neiafu Tonga Temple and Pago Pago American Samoa Temple.
  2. Several temples have received angels after their dedications. The first was the Idaho Falls Idaho Temple, which had an angel Moroni statue added in 1983, almost 40 years after its dedication, at the request of the president and other officials of the temple. As a part of renovation projects in the 2000s, the Church added angel Moroni statues to several of the originally statueless temples including the Freiberg Germany Temple (2001), Ogden Utah Temple (2002), Provo Utah Temple (2003), São Paulo Brazil Temple (2003), Tokyo Japan Temple (2004), Bern Switzerland Temple (2005), and London England Temple (2008).
  3. The Hong Kong China Temple (1996) is the only temple to have had an angel Moroni statue permanently removed from its design as part of a renovation (2022).
  4. Both the Sydney Australia Temple and Boston Massachusetts Temple were dedicated without angel Moroni statues due to pending litigation. In both cases, rulings allowed for the angels to be installed about a year after their respective dedications.
  5. The Church added a spire and angel Moroni statue to the Manhattan New York Temple four months after its dedication. These features were not part of the original design because the temple was built within an existing Church-owned building that was not designed as a temple.
  6. The Monticello Utah Temple is the only temple to have had a white angel Moroni. White enamel-covered fiberglass statues were to decorate the "smaller and remote-area" temples as conceived by President Gordon B. Hinckley, but the Monticello statue proved too difficult to see, especially in cloudy weather. It was replaced about a year later by a larger, traditional gold-leafed statue, which has remained the standard.
  7. The Anchorage Alaska Temple, Bismarck North Dakota Temple, Columbus Ohio Temple, Kona Hawaii Temple, and Caracas Venezuela Temple feature angel Moroni statues holding a scroll—a design originally created for use on the "smaller and remote-area" temples as conceived by President Gordon B. Hinckley.
  8. Only five temples feature an angel Moroni statue holding the gold plates. They are the Los Angeles California Temple, Washington D.C. Temple, Seattle Washington Temple, Jordan River Utah Temple, and Mexico City Mexico Temple.
  9. The Atlanta Georgia Temple {dedicated in 1983} was originally designed with no spire or angel Moroni, but the Church revised its plans, and nearly every temple built since featured an angel Moroni statue until 2020.
  10. In the early 1930s, a replica of the Salt Lake Temple angel Moroni was fashioned by Torleif Knaphus for the Washington D.C. Chapel. The statue was removed in 1976 when the chapel was sold (currently owned by the Unification Church) and is now on display in the Museum of Church History and Art. It is owned by the LDS Motion Picture Studio and was used in the filming of Mountain of the Lord. Castings of this statue have since been made and installed atop the Atlanta Georgia Temple (since replaced), Idaho Falls Idaho Temple, and Boston Massachusetts Temple.
  11. The Nauvoo Illinois Temple, The Hague Netherlands Temple, and Boston Massachusetts Temple participated in a tri-temple setting of the angel Moroni on the 178th anniversary of the day that Moroni first appeared to the Prophet Joseph Smith.
  12. The Nauvoo Temple was the first to have an angel (though not identified as Moroni), and it is the only temple to have a horizontal or flying angel (which functioned as a weathervane). The angel was inspired by Revelations 14:6, which says, "And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation, and kindred, and tongue, and people."
  13. The first temple to have a standing angel Moroni was the Salt Lake Temple.
  14. Not all temples have an east-facing angel Moroni statue. In fact, the angels on several temples face nearly due west because of lot orientation or the placement of spires.
  15. The trumpets of the angel Moroni statues on the Santiago Chile Temple, Tokyo Japan Temple, Apia Samoa Temple, and Salt Lake Temple have been lofted out of Moroni's grasp during earthquakes.
  16. Due to its height and conductivity, it is not unheard of for an angel Moroni statue to be struck by lightning during a thunderstorm just like a lightning rod.

I'm not sure your comment ("a new trend seems to be fewer temples have Moroni on top...") is correct.  A large majority of the temples have them, including all temples built subsequent to the Atlanta Georgia temple (until 2020, it seems).  Per the Church's website, here are the temples which have been dedicated subsequent to the Atlanta temple (and hence, per item #9 above, have Angel Moroni statues) :

  1. Nuku'alofa Tonga Temple
  2. Santiago Chile Temple
  3. Papeete Tahiti Temple
  4. Mexico City Mexico Temple
  5. Boise Idaho Temple
  6. Sydney Australia Temple
  7. Manila Philippines Temple
  8. Dallas Texas Temple
  9. Taipei Taiwan Temple
  10. Guatemala City Guatemala Temple
  11. Freiberg Germany Temple
  12. Stockholm Sweden Temple
  13. Chicago Illinois Temple
  14. Johannesburg South Africa Temple
  15. Seoul Korea Temple
  16. Lima Peru Temple
  17. Buenos Aires Argentina Temple
  18. Denver Colorado Temple
  19. Frankfurt Germany Temple
  20. Portland Oregon Temple
  21. Las Vegas Nevada Temple
  22. Toronto Ontario Temple
  23. San Diego California Temple
  24. Orlando Florida Temple
  25. Bountiful Utah Temple
  26. Mount Timpanogos Utah Temple
  27. St. Louis Missouri Temple
  28. Vernal Utah Temple
  29. Preston England Temple
  30. Monticello Utah Temple
  31. Anchorage Alaska Temple
  32. Colonia Juárez Chihuahua Mexico Temple
  33. Madrid Spain Temple
  34. Bogotá Colombia Temple
  35. Guayaquil Ecuador Temple
  36. Spokane Washington Temple
  37. Bismarck North Dakota Temple
  38. Columbia South Carolina Temple
  39. Detroit Michigan Temple
  40. Halifax Nova Scotia Temple
  41. Regina Saskatchewan Temple
  42. Billings Montana Temple
  43. Edmonton Alberta Temple
  44. Raleigh North Carolina Temple
  45. St. Paul Minnesota Temple
  46. Kona Hawaii Temple
  47. Ciudad Juárez Mexico Temple
  48. Hermosillo Sonora Mexico Temple
  49. Albuquerque New Mexico Temple
  50. Oaxaca Mexico Temple
  51. Tuxtla Gutiérrez Mexico Temple
  52. Louisville Kentucky Temple
  53. Palmyra New York Temple
  54. Fresno California Temple
  55. Medford Oregon Temple
  56. Memphis Tennessee Temple
  57. Reno Nevada Temple
  58. Cochabamba Bolivia Temple
  59. Tampico Mexico Temple
  60. Nashville Tennessee Temple
  61. Villahermosa Mexico Temple
  62. Montreal Quebec Temple
  63. San José Costa Rica Temple
  64. Fukuoka Japan Temple
  65. Adelaide Australia Temple
  66. Melbourne Australia Temple
  67. Suva Fiji Temple
  68. Mérida Mexico Temple
  69. Veracruz Mexico Temple
  70. Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple
  71. Oklahoma City Oklahoma Temple
  72. Caracas Venezuela Temple
  73. Houston Texas Temple
  74. Birmingham Alabama Temple
  75. Santo Domingo Dominican Republic Temple
  76. Boston Massachusetts Temple
  77. Recife Brazil Temple
  78. Porto Alegre Brazil Temple
  79. Montevideo Uruguay Temple
  80. Winter Quarters Nebraska Temple
  81. Guadalajara Mexico Temple
  82. Perth Australia Temple
  83. Columbia River Washington Temple
  84. Snowflake Arizona Temple
  85. Lubbock Texas Temple
  86. Monterrey Mexico Temple
  87. Campinas Brazil Temple
  88. Asunción Paraguay Temple
  89. Nauvoo Illinois Temple
  90. The Hague Netherlands Temple
  91. Brisbane Australia Temple
  92. Redlands California Temple
  93. Accra Ghana Temple
  94. Copenhagen Denmark Temple
  95. Manhattan New York Temple
  96. San Antonio Texas Temple
  97. Aba Nigeria Temple
  98. Newport Beach California Temple
  99. Sacramento California Temple
  100. Helsinki Finland Temple
  101. Rexburg Idaho Temple
  102. Curitiba Brazil Temple
  103. Panama City Panama Temple
  104. Twin Falls Idaho Temple
  105. Draper Utah Temple
  106. Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple
  107. Vancouver British Columbia Temple
  108. The Gila Valley Arizona Temple
  109. Cebu City Philippines Temple
  110. Kyiv Ukraine Temple
  111. San Salvador El Salvador Temple
  112. Quetzaltenango Guatemala Temple
  113. Kansas City Missouri Temple
  114. Manaus Brazil Temple
  115. Brigham City Utah Temple
  116. Calgary Alberta Temple
  117. Tegucigalpa Honduras Temple
  118. Gilbert Arizona Temple
  119. Fort Lauderdale Florida Temple
  120. Phoenix Arizona Temple
  121. Córdoba Argentina Temple
  122. Payson Utah Temple
  123. Trujillo Peru Temple
  124. Indianapolis Indiana Temple
  125. Tijuana Mexico Temple
  126. Provo City Center Temple
  127. Sapporo Japan Temple
  128. Philadelphia Pennsylvania Temple
  129. Fort Collins Colorado Temple
  130. Star Valley Wyoming Temple
  131. Hartford Connecticut Temple
  132. Paris France Temple
  133. Tucson Arizona Temple
  134. Meridian Idaho Temple
  135. Cedar City Utah Temple
  136. Concepción Chile Temple
  137. Barranquilla Colombia Temple
  138. Rome Italy Temple
  139. Kinshasa Democratic Republic of the Congo Temple
  140. Fortaleza Brazil Temple
  141. Port-Au-Prince Haiti Temple
  142. Lisbon Portugal Temple
  143. Arequipa Peru Temple
  144. Durban South Africa Temple

Here are the temples currently under construction or renovation (same link as above) :

  1. Columbus Ohio Temple
  2. Hamilton New Zealand Temple (never had an Angel Moroni, under renovation)
  3. Hong Kong China Temple (per item #3 above, its Angel Moroni is being permanently removed as part of renovations).
  4. Mesa Arizona Temple (never had an Angel Moroni, under renovation)
  5. Salt Lake Temple
  6. St. George Utah Temple (never had an Angel Moroni, under renovation)
  7. Tokyo Japan Temple
  8. Washington D.C. Temple
  9. Abidjan Ivory Coast Temple
  10. Alabang Philippines Temple
  11. Auckland New Zealand Temple (never had an Angel Moroni, under renovation)
  12. Bangkok Thailand Temple
  13. Belém Brazil Temple
  14. Feather River California Temple
  15. Layton Utah Temple
  16. Lima Peru Los Olivos Temple (will not have an Angel Moroni)
  17. Pocatello Idaho Temple
  18. Praia Cape Verde Temple (will not have an Angel Moroni)
  19. Puebla Mexico Temple
  20. Quito Ecuador Temple
  21. Richmond Virginia Temple
  22. Rio de Janeiro Brazil Temple
  23. San Juan Puerto Rico Temple (will not have an Angel Moroni)
  24. Saratoga Springs Utah Temple
  25. Urdaneta Philippines Temple
  26. Winnipeg Manitoba Temple
  27. Yigo Guam Temple (will not have an Angel Moroni)

In other words, of these 27 temples, only nine will lack the Angel Moroni.  And of those nine, only four are new (the other five being under renovation).

Let's take a look at the four "under construction temples" that will not have an Angel Moroni:

First, the Lima Peru Los Olivos Temple:

lima-peru-los-olivos-temple-3433-main.jp

A spire-with-Moroni-on-top doesn't fit the architecture, like the Mesa and Lai'e temples:

mesa-arizona-temple-186-main.jpg

laie-hawaii-temple-7370-main.jpg

So the omission of Moroni is not really surprising here.

Second, the Praia Cabo Verde Temple:

praia-cabo-verde-temple-2969-main.jpg

Third, the San Juan Puerto Rico Temple:

san-juan-puerto-rico-temple-2603-main.jp

Fourth and finally, the Yigo Guam Temple:

yigo-guam-temple-2882-main.jpg

These last three seem to be based on the same design, which does not incorporate a spire-with-Moroni-on-top feature.

So of the 171 temples listed above,

A) the vast majority include the Angel Moroni,

B) most of those which do not include a Moroni statue have been around for a long time, and as such are not indicative of a "trend" toward omitting Moroni;

C) of the temples that were constructed without an Angel Moroni statue, eight have the statue added in later years, and only one has had the statue removed (Hong Kong); 

D) of the "under construction" temples, a substantial majority of them have the Angel Moroni; and

E) of the few "under construction" temples that do not have the statue (all four of them), the omission seems more for aestetic/architectural reasons than anything else.

Four out of 171 temples does not seem to be much of a "trend."

-Smac

Edited by smac97
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1 hour ago, Amulek said:

If it were just a random picture of an angel with a trumpet and book, that would be one thing. But in this case the artist has identified the angel as being a specific angel: the angel Moroni. 

If Catholicism is true (which is presumably the position from which those making these statements are coming from) then the angel Moroni is an 'angel of light' (i.e., a devil in disguise). 

As such, I can understand the feeling that having one of Satan's minions depicted on your hymnal is "not compatible" with your Christian faith; and that finding such a depiction in your place of worship would, in fact, be "highly inappropriate."

 

I do get that, but I'm sure that the Catholic group that choose the symbol didn't do it because it was of the angel Moroni.  

I get why Catholics would want it changed, I would too in their shoes.  I get why they are upset and think it was a bad choice.  I would probably feel the same.  But I still feel that saying that an angel with a horn on a ball "is not compatible with Catholicism in any way" is a bit dramatic.  The angel Moroni isn't compatible with Catholicism, but like I said, I don't think the publishers were all "lets put a picture of Angel Moroni on the cover."  They used it because the picture itself is compatible, even if the meaning behind the picture isn't.  

Meaning is important and it wasn't a good choice to use it, but there are ways that the picture is not "highly inappropriate".

Edited by bluebell
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