Jump to content

3DOP

Contributor
  • Content Count

    3,131
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

3,243 Excellent

7 Followers

About 3DOP

  • Rank
    Brings Forth Plants

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Peace, Baseball, Beer, Joy, War, Boxing, Tolstoy, Wine, Church, Tennis, Family, Monastics, Economics, Politics, Scotland, Oceans, Prayer, Heaven, Flowers, Space, Bobby Darin, Time, Dracula, Rivers, Fire, Angels, Aquinas, Real Estate, Maureen O'Hara, Fish, Wind, Honey, Motion, The First Lady of Song, Lava, Stomach Acid, Merging, Jumping, Water Softeners, Barbecue, Bone, Bananas, Skin, American Football, Olivia de Havilland, and Michaelangelo.

Recent Profile Visitors

4,614 profile views
  1. "There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. This man came for a witness, to give testimony of the light, that all men might believe through him. He was not the light, but was to give testimony of the light. That was the true light, which enlighteneth every man that cometh into this world." ---Jn. 1:6-9, along with more of the chapter, read at the end of every Low Mass, in the Traditional Roman Rite. A good God will never place a single soul in darkness, or in "a bottomless pit of discovery", or in "a void that can't be filled".
  2. The Nehor, hey. I don't think we can be far apart here. Thanks for the reply! But you MUST be wrong. Who says you have to "find Christianity" before Christianity? I don't say that. Do you? I don't think you say that. Who says that? God is good. God is good. He will judge the choice Mayan with love and mercy according to the light he had. Right? Oh goodness yes, I insist that a good "God will grant truth to all who seek it" (enough truth to share eternity with God). I am not sure why we should be wary of "robust correction in the afterlife". But in this life, God will not hold anyone accou
  3. I just looked at it again...The "bottomless pit of exploration" is equated with "a void that can't be filled". This doesn't seem like the delight of discovery, but the frustration of the impossibility of arriving at a satisfactory intellectual position. It sounds like being lost. I don't mean "unsaved" theologically. But simply without any bearings, where one could not be culpable for what they think or believe because they are in a darkness not of their own making. I deny that this reflects reality. I accept North Korea. I accept Alzheimer's. But not intellectual darkness. An intellect withou
  4. The Nehor, hi. I don't think so. Neither Alzheimer's nor being native North Korean seems to me like consignment to a "bottomless pit of exploration". If I misunderstood Mike, he will correct me. I thought his expression was a reference to an idea that God places souls in a position where one can not know what one needs to know. Alzheimer's relieves one of any exploration, and I am confident that God takes consideration for "being born in North Korea". I hold that it is the will of a good God that people are born all over the globe, and that some of us will experience dementia before we die. Bu
  5. Sure calm...I misunderstood him perhaps. Mike meant a "bottomless pit" in a good way? Anyway, you got me...discovery is good...I am not sure I could think that this is what Mike meant. Robert, it is whatever Mike meant. And Mike, whatever you say. I understood you to mean something impossible to find, where the next discovery leads you to feel more hopeless than before.
  6. A good God does not hand anyone a "bottomless pit of exploration".
  7. I am sorry tttribett. I should mind my own business. I don't know how I quoted you saying what you did not say. Sorry. I would make it go away if I knew how.
  8. Hey mark...let me ramble...this thread is far from its roots. ---- Obviously, I am not familiar with your garments, whether outer or inner... If I am not mistaken, in ancient Catholicism, the newly baptized were admitted into all of the "secrets". To this day, we have what is called the Mass of the Catechumens (unbaptized)...which in the liturgy takes us up to any sermons and the Creed. This would have anciently been followed with dismissal of the catechumens for further instruction. Then would begin what is still called the Mass of the Faithful, for which one qualifies when bap
  9. Longview, hi again. I was reminded on Thursday of Easter Week of our discussion here in one of my readings which was a brief essay about Catholic teaching on the resurrection of the body. Here is a sample: "We find this article of our holy faith continual represented in the catacombs: its several symbols, together with the Good Shepherd, quite the favorite subject of primitive Christian art. I those early ages of the Church, when to receive baptism was to break entirely with the sensuality of previous habits of life, this consoling dogma of the resurrection of the body was strongly u
  10. I don't know about ALL Augustinian Fathers. There was this the guy in Germany about five hundred and four years ago...I thought he was a "mess around" Augustinian. But yours sound pretty solid!
  11. longview, hi. Para. 1: There might be some serious difference between the resurrected body of the just, and the resurrected body of the unjust. I am not as familiar with the unjust. But yeah, I'll try to do a little digging. Thanks for your interest. Para. 2: I will have to revisit 1 Cor. 15. Are you saying that only in the lowest kingdom are there variations of magnitude? I doubt that Catholics could go along with that. Para. 3: Sounds good. We say that Christ only died because with His work finished, He willed to "give up the ghost". He wasn't overcome. Christ overcame, even i
  12. First question: For star differeth from star in glory. So yes. The Church teaches it. So yes. The Paradiso in Dante's Divine Comedy is an excellent literary tribute to this great Catholic truth about degrees of glory. No two are alike. So yes. Everyone receives their own physical bodies at the general judgment. I have to go to work. Bye. G'day longview.
  13. I think I am probably 3d. The nature of the resurrection? I am sorry if it was "like pulling teeth" and "murky at best" as to whether it was physical. (I am not recalling the discussion). I suspect I was holding back for some other reason. I absolutely affirm the physical resurrection of our Lord on Easter morning.
×
×
  • Create New...