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I have a few questions, but everyone is welcome to join in to help. I was raised Catholic, both loving parents, I have an older sister who is in college at the moment, and i'm almost done with high school. I've been hearing about some of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and I'm interested in joining, since they seem to be happy whenever i talk to one, and I want that. I also hear about eternity in heaven and I would love to know more about what it takes to get there, but I feel skeptical going into this since I don't know much about the Church, so forgive me for my questions, however many there might be :) but I would appreciate it if I received help, because I think it's possible it could be worth it. Anyway, my first question is, what sets mormon christains apart from the rest of the christains accross the world?

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One good place to start to understand LDS doctrine is by reading our articles of faith. These are 13 points of belief given by Joseph Smith when someone asked him what Mormons believed.

1 We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.

2 We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam’s transgression.

3 We believe that through the Atonement of Christ, all mankind may be saved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel.

4 We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, Repentance; third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of sins; fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost.

5 We believe that a man must be called of God, by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the ordinances thereof.

6 We believe in the same organization that existed in the Primitive Church, namely, apostles, prophets, pastors, teachers, evangelists, and so forth.

7 We believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy, revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, and so forth.

8 We believe the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly; we also believe the Book of Mormon to be the word of God.

9 We believe all that God has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.

10 We believe in the literal gathering of Israel and in the restoration of the Ten Tribes; that Zion (the New Jerusalem) will be built upon the American continent; that Christ will reign personally upon the earth; and, that the earth will be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory.

11 We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.

12 We believe in being subject to kings, presidents, rulers, and magistrates, in obeying, honoring, and sustaining the law.

13 We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.

Of course, for a more indepth understanding of LDS doctrine, you'll want to contact the missionaries. :)

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One good place to start to understand LDS doctrine is by reading our articles of faith. These are 13 points of belief given by Joseph Smith when someone asked him what Mormons believed.

1 We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost.

2 We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam’s transgression.

3 We believe that through the Atonement of Christ, all mankind may be saved, by obedience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel.

4 We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, Repentance; third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of sins; fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost.

5 We believe that a man must be called of God, by prophecy, and by the laying on of hands by those who are in authority, to preach the Gospel and administer in the ordinances thereof.

6 We believe in the same organization that existed in the Primitive Church, namely, apostles, prophets, pastors, teachers, evangelists, and so forth.

7 We believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy, revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, and so forth.

8 We believe the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly; we also believe the Book of Mormon to be the word of God.

9 We believe all that God has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we believe that He will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.

10 We believe in the literal gathering of Israel and in the restoration of the Ten Tribes; that Zion (the New Jerusalem) will be built upon the American continent; that Christ will reign personally upon the earth; and, that the earth will be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory.

11 We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.

12 We believe in being subject to kings, presidents, rulers, and magistrates, in obeying, honoring, and sustaining the law.

13 We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.

Of course, for a more indepth understanding of LDS doctrine, you'll want to contact the missionaries. :)

That definitely sums up the ground work. Thank you! Do you know in detail what the renewing of the Earth will be like and for what purpose? like will everyone be forgiven for sins and we live in heaven?

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Good morning Looking...

Welcome to the Board... my answer is the same as most you would receive here... while we welcome your questions and will try to answer them, you really need to be able to read and study more in depth than what you can receive here on the Board.

So, the first suggestion is that you go to official LDS websites for accurate information that you can download such as lds.org... here you will find many answers to your questions as well as other resources. For instance, our "standard works" are online (Bible, Book of Mormon, Doctrine & Covenants, Pearl of Great Price), as well as the Church magazine, the Ensign. Be careful online however because there are numerous sites that sound like they are "Mormon" but are really what we term "anti-Mormon."

Second, you can always contact your local LDS "Ward" (church/congregation) missionaries, if your parents have no objection since you are underage, who would be delighted to meet with you...

I see that bluebell has listed the Articals of Faith which gives the general outline of our beliefs... I would like to encourage you to follow through and study our faith... it is worth the time and effort.

All good wishes...

from the beautiful central Oregon coast... Garden Girl

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also I'm curious to know from members what thier personal experiences are being mormon, and how it affects their daily lives

The LDS do seem to be very happy on the outside. They should, the gospel really does seem to offer a better after life if each of your family are on the same page. If they aren't then, it may not be as nice. With there being the 3 kingdoms. The celestial being the top kingdom, it has several levels so a good chance that they'll be together as a family!

LDS have a very good lifestyle. The WoW, abstaining from alcohol, tobacco, tea and coffee, is a big plus in my opinion. Even though the tea and coffee do have side benefits, they can be detrimental with some down side effects too.

LDS are caring and loving individuals and seem to be very neighborly. They are very efficient in their communities and can put together a team to help in any disaster quicker than any group of people I'm aware of.

I'm a lifetime Mormon who has some issues with my testimony of the history of the church that hasn't been totally transparent because of the warts. But all faiths have a history. Many of those that were involved in the beginnings of the church had faults and were new to the theology put forth by Joseph Smith who had visions and spoke with God first hand. They made mistakes, some very big mistakes. But all in all there is something to this church that I can't seem to put my finger on but it keeps me going. It's something wonderous to be sure, just don't know how to put it in words. Even with my faith shaken and all, there is something to it. Maybe it's because they are my tribe, the Mormons.

Good luck in your search of the LDS. Do as the others on here have suggested above. Or attend church in your area, it might be a shock at first because you'll see regular members giving talks instead of the pastor or priest all the time. But it is pretty cool, when you get a diamond in the rough speaking to you.

Hope this helps, in a way we two are alike, I'm trying to decide whether to stay and go full throttle as before or start attending another church. But just can't bear to leave the church and the people I've always loved.

Edited by Tacenda
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These may be helpful, but face to face will be much more satisfying...

This is the basic manual for Sunday School for investigators and new converts, it is an easy quick read with links to scriptures that will help undrestand how we have come to a belief:

http://www.lds.org/m...ciples?lang=eng

This is the Church website created specifically for those nonmembers interested in learning more about LDS:

http://mormon.org/

It includes a lot of profiles so you can see what we are like:

http://mormon.org/people

If you want to chat it has that function as well:

http://mormon.org/chat

General beliefs:

http://mormon.org/wh...mormons-believe

Values, how we see those beliefs impacting our lives:

http://mormon.org/values

Frequently asked questions:

http://mormon.org/faq

-----------

It might be easier to wander around mormons.org for awhile and then come back here for clarification on a point you don't understand. Mormon.org is written to be as clear and nonconfusing as possible, while here we all have our own way of saying things which may leave something important out or may even sound contradictory at times because of what we choose to emphasize.

Also not all here are LDS members so you will get nonmembers' views as well, hopefully they will identfy themselves so they don't confuse you.

Edited by calmoriah
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... my first question is, what sets mormon christains apart from the rest of the christains accross the world?

The shortest possible answer: The Restoration.

I would encourage you to go to lds.org and search for videos and articles about what the restoration is. In short, it is the restoration of Christs Church, and the authority to run it, on earth.

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I have a few questions, but everyone is welcome to join in to help. I was raised Catholic, both loving parents, I have an older sister who is in college at the moment, and i'm almost done with high school. I've been hearing about some of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and I'm interested in joining, since they seem to be happy whenever i talk to one, and I want that. I also hear about eternity in heaven and I would love to know more about what it takes to get there, but I feel skeptical going into this since I don't know much about the Church, so forgive me for my questions, however many there might be :) but I would appreciate it if I received help, because I think it's possible it could be worth it. Anyway, my first question is, what sets mormon christains apart from the rest of the christains accross the world?

Welcome LookingForLight. I hope you find it.

Mormons understand and believe in ecclesiastical authority. Like all believers, Mormons believe that God can touch individual souls with or without His Church. But like Catholics and Eastern Orthodox, Mormons also believe that God instituted a priesthood as the ordinary means of spreading the blessings of the Gospel. All three of those churches agree that if this priestly line is somehow severed, that the church can no longer administer what you as a former Catholic would call sacraments, and what Mormons would probably call ordinances. The difference between Mormons and Catholics is that Mormons believe the Catholics have lost priestly authority. The difference between Mormons and Protestants is that Protestants deny a need for such priestly authority. That explains why Protestants feel free to start new churches without proving any connection to the apostles of Christ. It also explains why Mormons only start new churches under the authority of Latter-day apostles. The key issue between being Catholic and LDS in my opinion, is on whether or not God intended the apostolic office to continue through 12 apostles as Mormons teach, or to be fulfilled through larger numbers of bishops as Catholics and Orthodox of the East and West teach.

3DOP

Edited by 3DOP
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LookingForLight...

The above poster, 3DOP is a wonderful contributor to this Board... and my favorite Catholic who posts here. As Calmoriah pointed out, many posters are non LDS... many are "critics," while others like 3DOP are even handed while standing for their own beliefs... they emphasize our common ground whenever they can...

GG

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I'm glad you've met people who are happy. You need to know that being a member of the LDS church doesn't eliminate hardships, pain, suffering or exposure to evil. A solid relationship with a Heavenly Father and Savior who we know knows us personally does make it easier to take the long view.

I'd say the big difference between Mormons and other Christians is (1) the way we see God differently (as an individual being with a body who knows us individually and personally and who has a specific purpose for our earthly existence, whose first born Son Jesus is also an individual being with a body who carries out His Father's will, and the Holy Ghost who is individual but who does not yet have a body who testifies of God and Jesus and truth), and (2) we believe that God has called a prophet for our day, just like He did throughout biblical times and as He said in Amos 3:7.

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I'm glad you've met people who are happy. You need to know that being a member of the LDS church doesn't eliminate hardships, pain, suffering or exposure to evil. A solid relationship with a Heavenly Father and Savior who we know knows us personally does make it easier to take the long view.

I'd say the big difference between Mormons and other Christians is (1) the way we see God differently (as an individual being with a body who knows us individually and personally and who has a specific purpose for our earthly existence, whose first born Son Jesus is also an individual being with a body who carries out His Father's will, and the Holy Ghost who is individual but who does not yet have a body who testifies of God and Jesus and truth), and (2) we believe that God has called a prophet for our day, just like He did throughout biblical times and as He said in Amos 3:7.

Hi rpn...

I think you are understandably eager to encourage our young inquirer. But I think it is only fair to point out that all Christians would be in agreement that God "knows us individually and personally and who has a specific purpose for our earthly existence..." Nor is the individuality of the persons of the Godhead in dispute. This alIows for practical purposes for the non-LDS Christian to pray to each of the Persons individually and to recognize the different works attributed to each. Assuming that non-LDS Christians are incorrect in how they understand the Trinity, it seems like we still must avoid giving the impression that they don't recognize significant practical distinctions regarding the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost as Latter-day Christians do.

3DOP

Edited by 3DOP
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What is significantly different between LDS and nonLDS Christians is the concept that man is an eternal being, that God is literally the father of our spirits (though how spiritual creation takes place we don't know), that Christ is literally our elder spirit brother and all of mankind are literally spirit brothers and sisters and that we may become literally as God and Christ are now if we accept the Atonement fully and become one with them. We also believe that man is literally made in the image of God, IOW we are the same species. When we say "we are God's children", we mean it in the same sense as we might now say "I am the child of my father and mother" though in the first case we are talking about a spiritual family and in the second we are talking about a physical family.

(It might help to know that LDS believe the spirit is more refined/pure matter and is not immaterial.)

With other Christian faiths, they believe man is completely a creation of God and there will never be a time when that gap between creator and creature is removed. Man is "other" to God even though Christ himself is both God and Man.

3DOP or any other nonLDS Christian will correct me, I am sure, if I have been careless in any of my phrasing.

Edited by calmoriah
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What is significantly different between LDS and nonLDS Christians is the concept that man is an eternal being, that God is literally the father of our spirits (though how spiritual creation takes place we don't know), that Christ is literally our elder spirit brother and all of mankind are literally spirit brothers and sisters and that we may become literally as God and Christ are now if we accept the Atonement fully and become one with them. We also believe that man is literally made in the image of God, IOW we are the same species. When we say "we are God's children", we mean it in the same sense as we might now say "I am the child of my father and mother" though in the first case we are talking about a spiritual family and in the second we are talking about a physical family.

(It might help to know that LDS believe the spirit is more refined/pure matter and is not immaterial.)

With other Christian faiths, they believe man is completely a creation of God and there will never be a time when that gap between creator and creature is removed. Man is "other" to God even though Christ himself is both God and Man.

3DOP or any other nonLDS Christian will correct me, I am sure, if I have been careless in any of my phrasing.

---Highlight is mine

Elephants, koi, and beetles are "other". Jesus did not become one of those. It was not unbecoming for the Son to become man...to become the Son of Man, as He called Himself. Man is sufficently compatible to divinity that the very Son of God became one of us. If LDS think that we ignore what it means to be made in the image of God, we would have to admit that Catholics would see the LDS teaching as an exaggeration. Yes, we believe that man is created and that God is not. But God made us for union with Him. Of no other material creature may this be said. Dolphins are not made in the image of God. Assuredly, not all men are gods, but God can be a man. And every man is made to be God. Catholics believe that God is an a sense transcendent (infinitely above us). Catholics also believe that God is immanent (intimately with us and like us).

Both truths need to be maintained. We can not sacrifice one truth for the other. We cannot emphasize one truth at the expense of the other. I would suggest that in Mormonism as with us, although there is a great emphasis on how God is a man like us, there is an equally important sense in which God is far far above us. It would not be comforting to believe that God is so much of a man that He didn't know us better than ourselves. We would not be comforted to know that tragic events occur that take God by surprise. Nobody believes in such a weak God, however amiable He might be. The LDS God is terribly great too. We could never fathom in this life the power and might and wisdom and knowledge that belongs to the LDS God too. Yes God loves us like our dads do/did. But both Catholics and Mormons have to agree that the greatness of God is beyond what we can imagine to be, and that is the same sense in which Catholics believe that God is "other".

3DOP

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I understand--I don't know if I am 'typical' among LDS though--the "image of God" to be understood by nonLDS Christians as to be partaking of certain attributes of God such as Love while not being capable of sharing all attributes...which I see LDS believing, at least as an eventual possibility through union with God....which would definitely qualify as an exaggeration by those who believe the former. So in that sense, saying we believe in a literal "image of God" while other Christians don't, I am inaccurate and I definitely don't mean to imply that nonLDS Christians ignore the teaching, just that they interpret it differently. I shall try to remember to define what I mean by "literal" in the future.

So besides the "created/noncreated" attribute, are there any other attributes that Man will not eventually share with God in the Catholic view?

Edited by calmoriah
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Hi cal,

I am reluctant place any other limits upon the possibilities except those that arise due to our created status, which is a significant distinction. It might have a bearing upon to whom all glory and worship is justly due. But I don't know that it presents any limit to the attributes of the exalted Christian. "The omnis" seem to present difficulties. But even then we are said to be heirs with Christ. We are said to be adopted sons and daughters of God. The implications are strongly in favor of a way that makes us, while retaining our individual personalities, so united with God, that He withholds nothing. Eye hath not seen. Ear hath not heard.

My main interest was to demonstrate that for all Christians, God is with us, and God is far above us. We can have the intimacy of closeness and the comfort of strength. We may differ as to how far God is above us and as a result we may differ as to the degree to which we can partake of the divine nature. I am sure that Catholic deification would encompass any attributes that LDS deification teaches, and possibly more. If I understand correctly, some LDS deny that God is all-powerful in the same sense as us. For that reason, one speculating about LDS deification doesn't struggle with the apparent contradiction of multiple beings having omnipotence for instance. That would be the kind of attribute that it could seem difficult for God to share. It is much easier for an LDS to say that there are no limits to deification if there are limits already to the attributes of God.

If Catholicism were true, the potential of the deified is at least equal and perhaps greater than if Mormonism were true. I am aware that there are some LDS who accept "the omnis" of God. They would probably admit the same difficulties to the idea of "100% deification" as Catholics have to wrestle with.

Regards,

3DOP

Edited by 3DOP
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My main interest was to demonstrate that for all Christians, God is with us, and God is far above us.

And I think you did that quite well.

If Catholicism were true, the potential of the deified is at least equal and perhaps greater than if Mormonism were true. I am aware that there are some LDS who accept "the omnis" of God. They would probably admit the same difficulties to the idea of "100% deification" as Catholics have to wrestle with.

Do you see potential to become creators as well?
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And I think you did that quite well.

Do you see potential to become creators as well?

Create out of pre-existing matter or out of nothing? From pre-existing matter, certainly. Ex nihilo...maybe...we are sons of God. We inherit all things in Christ. Again, you see that the hesitation to believe in "100% deification" arises because of our differing beliefs about what God can do.

But I wonder if anyone would even be interested in more creation. Ho hum. Been there, seen that. It seems like time is for the created. Eternity will be focused on what is uncreated.

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As a former LDS that now attends another Book of Mormon (Restoration) church, I say, if you feel the LORD is leading you to the LDS church...

Go for it!

I had a great time growing up LDS! I was surrounded by awesome people who love Jesus and with many programs to help me advance and grow in my faith in Him.

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