Jump to content

For those who remember life prevcrs and satellite dishes....


Recommended Posts

11 minutes ago, jkwilliams said:

I never could figure out how they managed to show conference on a public television station in Los Angeles. Maybe the church donated to them. Dunno.

Don’t tv stations have to donate a certain amount of programming to public service?...showing religious programming might fit the bill.

https://www.psaresearch.com/lets-clear-the-air-about-public-service-announcements/

Link to comment
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I think my friend, Don Bernardo ( @Bernard Gui :help: ), listened to it via a faraway (staticky?) phone line on his mission in South America.  Is that what you did in Bolivia, John ( @jkwilliams)?

 

IIRC, we did once in the mission home (Central America). When I was a youth we travelled 100 miles to our stake center in Albuquerque to hear it over phone lines, and later we had phone conference in our local building. It was hard to hear.

Edited by Bernard Gui
Link to comment
Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, jkwilliams said:

Maybe so. 

I believe KIRO in Seattle did that for a while. The owner was LDS.

Edited by Bernard Gui
Link to comment
Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Bernard Gui said:

I believe KIRO in Seattle did that for a while. The owner was LDS IIRC.

I just thought it was odd to be on a publicly funded PBS station (KCET). 

Edited by jkwilliams
Link to comment
1 minute ago, jkwilliams said:

I just thought it was odd to be on a publicly funded PBS station. 

Wikipedia...

Quote

Sale to LDS Church

In April 1963, the Deseret News Publishing Company, the for-profit media arm of the Salt Lake City-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), began purchasing stock in Queen City Broadcasting starting with a 10 percent share from several minority partners including Sen. Magnuson.[9] Six months later the LDS Church purchased an additional 50 percent, giving them majority control of the KIRO stations.[10] Along with having earned a handsome return on his original investment of 28 years earlier, Saul Hass subsequently joined the board of the LDS Church's broadcasting subsidiary, which was renamed Bonneville International in 1964.[11]

Soon after the FCC approved the sale, Bonneville executives Lloyd Cooney and Kenneth L. Hatch arrived in Seattle to lead the renamed KIRO, Inc. division. Upon Cooney's departure to run for U.S. Senate in 1980, Hatch became president, CEO and chairman, positions he held until 1995. Under Hatch's leadership, KIRO, Inc. (which, in addition to KIRO-AM-FM-TV, would later include KING radio and Third Avenue Productions) became one of the nation's premier regional broadcast groups. KIRO's corporate board included many notable leaders including Mary Maxwell (mother of Bill Gates); Pay 'n Save chairman M. Lamont Bean; Washington Mutual chief executive officer Tony Eyring and Gordon B. Hinckley, a future president of the LDS Church. The KIRO stations moved their offices and studios to "Broadcast House" at Third Avenue and Broad Street in Seattle's Belltown district in 1968, where KIRO-TV remains to this day.

 

Link to comment
Just now, Bernard Gui said:

Wikipedia...

 

I'm talking about our local PBS station in Los Angeles, not KIRO, which I understand has been a church property for a long time.

Link to comment
12 minutes ago, jkwilliams said:

I'm talking about our local PBS station in Los Angeles, not KIRO, which I understand has been a church property for a long time.

Oh...sorry.  I thought there was a comment about tv stations having to donate time for public service.

Link to comment
1 minute ago, Bernard Gui said:

Oh...sorry.  I thought there was a comment about tv stations having to donate time for public service.

Yes, there was, but I'm not sure that applies to PBS stations. 

Link to comment
Just now, jkwilliams said:

Yes, there was, but I'm not sure that applies to PBS stations. 

Isn’t PBS supposed to be all public service?

Link to comment
Just now, Bernard Gui said:

Isn’t PBS supposed to be all public service?

Yes. I'm just not sure how religious broadcasting can be reconciled with PBS being government-funded. Not complaining, just curious.

Link to comment
17 hours ago, Calm said:

If you didn’t live in Utah or within range of a full broadcast, what do you remember about conference weekends?  Could you get a full session on the radio?

In the eighties,  I lived in a remote part of the US.  We couldn't get TV or radio signals where we were at.  We could only listen to conference talks long after conference was over by ordering a set of the conference cassette tapes.  We would often listen to a recorded conference talk during our family sacrament meetings.

We had a shelf of these sets (example at this link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/LDS-MORMON-CASSETTE-TAPES-BOX-SET-156TH-GENERAL-CONFERENCE-1986-BONNEVILLE-/233408912608)

-cacheman

Link to comment
18 hours ago, Calm said:

For those who live outside the US, what were your options before available online?  I am assuming at least since 80s, there was the option for most to go to the chapel to watch VCR recordings a week or two or more after conference....but I could be wrong. I can’t remember what we did the April in 96 when we were in Russia. Will have to ask husband if he remembers.  We met in an old convent school. Don’t remember having anything electronic available.  

Remember having a clunky laptop I read Nibley’s volumes off of with the old GospelLibrary program, but don’t think we had internet available yet there. Definitely no video programs besides Russian tv and some videos in a little video unit that had been damaged likely by going through customs so they were hard to hear and looked horrible. 

On my mission in Austria early 70s they would take a couple of Sundays and instead of Church they would play sound recordings of the conference talks and someone with a slide projector would put up photos of the person who was speaking.

Link to comment
8 hours ago, Bernard Gui said:

IIRC, we did once in the mission home (Central America). When I was a youth we travelled 100 miles to our stake center in Albuquerque to hear it over phone lines, and later we had phone conference in our local building. It was hard to hear.

Oohhh!  That's what it was!  I'm sorry I got the memory garbled from seeing you comment on it here before!  ¡Me equivoqué!  ¡Mil perdones!  (For the censors' benefit: "I made a mistake!  A thousand pardons!") :D

Link to comment
1 hour ago, cacheman said:

In the eighties,  I lived in a remote part of the US.  We couldn't get TV or radio signals where we were at.  We could only listen to conference talks long after conference was over by ordering a set of the conference cassette tapes.  We would often listen to a recorded conference talk during our family sacrament meetings.

We had a shelf of these sets (example at this link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/LDS-MORMON-CASSETTE-TAPES-BOX-SET-156TH-GENERAL-CONFERENCE-1986-BONNEVILLE-/233408912608)

-cacheman

Is it too much in-real-life information, or would you mind divulging where you were?  (I'm just very curious! :huh:)

;) :D

Link to comment
Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Kenngo1969 said:

Is it too much in-real-life information, or would you mind divulging where you were?  (I'm just very curious! :huh:)

;) :D

And why?  It feels like there is an interesting story to be told. 
 

I am guessing somewhere in Alaska...

Edited by Calm
Link to comment

I Googled "Are there any areas of the United States that are so remote that they do not receive a television or radio signal?"  Of course, that was then and this is now, since we are talking about some time ago, so perhaps, if there were such areas during the time in question that, since, have been reached by broadcast media, my query would not cover those.

Nothing on the United States yet, but I did find this article, which talks about three "only-game-in-town" broadcasters in remote parts of the world: The Falkland Islands, The Shetland Islands, and Roxby Downs in the Australian Outback.  Man, that would be a fascinating gig, but one would sure have to be creative and committed to keep people listening!  I wonder, could the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints work out an agreement with these remote broadcasters?  "You don't have to worry about programming for eight hours total on weekends twice a year, and we'll work out the logistics!" :) :D   https://www.radioworld.com/news-and-business/radio-reaches-the-worlds-most-remote-places

Link to comment

I grew up in Northern California in the 1970's (way North, our stake center was in OR). I remember we had a Ward activity where every family wrote the local T.V. station in Redding asking them to broadcast Conference.  This was the station where Mark Eubank was the Weather Man.  This was before he moved to the Utah channel 5 T.V. station.  We think Mark had some pull because latter the station starting broadcasting the Spoken Word and a hour of the Sunday morning conference session in April.

Link to comment
18 hours ago, jkwilliams said:

For some reason, the Sunday morning session was usually broadcast on our local PBS station in Los Angeles when I was a kid in the 70s and early 80s. The rest of the sessions could be heard in the stake center over what they called "sideband radio." My dad always took us to the priesthood session, but other than that, we would just watch the Sunday morning session on TV.

Yep SSB. Very cool. 

Link to comment
On 6/7/2021 at 9:48 PM, Calm said:

If you didn’t live in Utah or within range of a full broadcast, what do you remember about conference weekends?  Could you get a full session on the radio?

 I just remember watching only the Sunday morning session or maybe it was afternoon being shown as a public service on one of the TV channels. But maybe my parents just weren’t into going in to church to watch movies of conference weeks after it came out, which seems like it would be the only other option, or anything else that require keeping 5 kids quiet and occupied for a couple of hours twice a day for all and three times for two of them (two boys)...though youngest brother hit deacon after VCRs appeared iirc, so really just one.

Satellite dishes allowing watching from chapels...when did that start?  Seems like it was about when I went back to BYU late 70s.  Can’t for the life of me remember how I watched conference while at BYU.

Before that - Side band radio.

You have your regular radio then you also need one for the frequencies BETWEEN the regular commercial stations. That's not a correct explanation but it's close enough.

Link to comment
1 hour ago, rodheadlee said:

Yep SSB. Very cool. 

Dang you beat me to it!

Link to comment

Then there was short wave.

You can get broadcasts from all over the world that way

And before that was pony express... ;)

 

Link to comment
6 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

Oohhh!  That's what it was!  I'm sorry I got the memory garbled from seeing you comment on it here before!  ¡Me equivoqué!  ¡Mil perdones!  (For the censors' benefit: "I made a mistake!  A thousand pardons!") :D

¡No te preocupes!

Link to comment
17 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

Then there was short wave.

You can get broadcasts from all over the world that way

And before that was pony express... ;)

 

If you or a friend had a radio. We tried to set up a link to call home for Mother’s Day in Costa Rica, but couldn’t make it work.

 

Link to comment
6 hours ago, Calm said:

And why?  It feels like there is an interesting story to be told. 
 

I am guessing somewhere in Alaska...

Driving from Provo to northern New Mexico in the 60s, there were some stretches where I couldn’t get any AM stations on the car radio.

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...