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Sad story with many LDS references


bsjkki

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22 hours ago, bsjkki said:

A 27 year old killed his parents and housekeeper. They were members. I wonder what happened with this young man that he could do this. Super sad.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6722357/Devastated-husband-slain-housekeeper-triple-murder-shooting-describes-heartbreak.html

This is a tragic story and it'll be interesting to see what other details come out.  

Here's his page on Mormon.org (Camden Nicholson):

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:l2GkYKAyL4oJ:https://www.Mormon.org/me/6srg

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On 2/20/2019 at 2:34 PM, Tacenda said:

I wondered if it was for money. But he did look awful.

This could be from a lack of sleep from shock and a long interrogation, but he looks so different from the sweet pictures of him younger, it seems so obvious something major must have changed for him.  Most of us know what drugs/alcohol can do and how common they are in murders and domestic violence, so for me it is a reasonable assumption especially since most forms of mental illness, if there is any danger it is much more common to be self injury.

Edited by Calm
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1 hour ago, Calm said:

This could be from a lack of sleep from shock and a long interrogation, but he looks so different from the sweet pictures of him younger, it seems so obvious something major must have changed for him.  Most of us know what drugs/alcohol can do and how common they are in murders and domestic violence, so for me it is a reasonable assumption especially since most forms of mental illness, if there is any danger it is much more common to be self injury.

 

On 2/20/2019 at 1:18 PM, strappinglad said:

Just from his mug shot I will make a leap and suggest drugs were involved. 

According to the article he had taken some drugs and looks like money was also an issue. https://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/news/tn-dpt-me-nicholson-20190221-story.html

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  • 1 month later...

Looks like mental illness was at the heart of this tragic story. From what the PI hired by the parents said, his mental problems became apparent while he was on his mission. 

https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2019/02/21/detective-says-he-was-hired-to-find-son-now-accused-of-murdering-his-parents/

Quote

 

In a statement to Youssef, Camden’s mom said her son was diagnosed with Aspergers and was ordering steroids on the internet.

She said his eight-year battle with mental illness and depression began when he returned home from a Mormon missionary trip.

My son Camden left on an LDS mission to Jacksonville, Florida Spanish-speaking mission in March 2010, at the age of 19-years-old. Before Camden left on his mission, he was one of the most kindest, gentle, easy-going, and functioning young men. After nine months is in the mission field, the doctor called stating, ‘Camden wanted to commit suicide.’

 

Sometimes mental illness becomes apparent after significant stress, so it's not surprising that symptoms he had managed to control might come to the fore on a mission. And, no, I am not 'blaming' the missionary experience, just noting that this kid obviously had some underlying problems.

Edited by jkwilliams
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  • 11 months later...
On 3/29/2019 at 4:05 PM, jkwilliams said:

Looks like mental illness was at the heart of this tragic story. From what the PI hired by the parents said, his mental problems became apparent while he was on his mission. 

https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2019/02/21/detective-says-he-was-hired-to-find-son-now-accused-of-murdering-his-parents/

Sometimes mental illness becomes apparent after significant stress, so it's not surprising that symptoms he had managed to control might come to the fore on a mission. And, no, I am not 'blaming' the missionary experience, just noting that this kid obviously had some underlying problems.

If indeed mental health issues are part of the equation, the age of onset looks right. Schizophrenia and related symptomatology often appear in the mid to late teens for males. A sad tale, nevertheless. 

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4 hours ago, Islander said:

If indeed mental health issues are part of the equation, the age of onset looks right. Schizophrenia and related symptomatology often appear in the mid to late teens for males. A sad tale, nevertheless. 

Yep. My youngest son started developing symptoms of paranoid personality disorder in his mid-teens, and it became quite mature by the time he was 27 or so.  We tried to get him to recognize that his feelings were not normal, but the problem with paranoia is that trying to convince someone with the disorder that there is a problem becomes just one more self-fulfilling "thing" they use to confirm their delusion.

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On 2/20/2019 at 1:18 PM, strappinglad said:

Just from his mug shot I will make a leap and suggest drugs were involved. 

 

On 2/20/2019 at 2:34 PM, Tacenda said:

I wondered if it was for money. But he did look awful.

Often, mugshots are taken after an arrestee has been detained, taken to an unfamiliar environment, subjected to intense questioning for hours on end by complete strangers, and perhaps has missed out on needed nourishment and sleep. No one ever looks good in a mugshot.  The arrestee could be as honest as the day is long, as pure as the driven snow, and universally beloved, and s/he still wouldn't look good in a mugshot.  "Look at his mugshot!  He looks guilty!"  But Mother Theresa wouldn't look good (and might even look guilty) in a mugshot!  For some, that's the whole point of taking a mugshot.

Just sayin'!

And remember: I'm one of the most pro-police, pro-prosecution people you will (n)ever meet in Cyber Space.

P.S.: I see Cal beat me to it!  She usually does! :angry:

;):D

Edited by Kenngo1969
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17 minutes ago, Kenngo1969 said:

mugshots are taken after an arrestee has been detained, taken to an unfamiliar environment, subjected to intense questioning for hours on end by complete strangers, and perhaps has missed out on needed nourishment and sleep.

Think DMV DL shots at the end of a very long day with no opportunity to fix hair or face...and then up it several degrees of discomfort. 
And then there is the problem of smiling for a mugshot. I can see people wondering if that would give the wrong impression. (Apparently they are told to have no expression on their face, see link in next post)
 

Edited by Calm
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Smiling in a photo can drastically change appearance to a more positive look...if it was in other contexts. The instruction for no facial expression in mugshots apparently leaves people wondering what to do, which probably contributes to spacey, blank, and other unappealing looks.
 

Quote

The general practice when taking a mugshot, Riddle said, is to have the person look directly at the camera with their full face and ears exposed and no facial expression. 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/1355499002

Edited by Calm
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On 3/21/2020 at 12:47 PM, Kenngo1969 said:

 

Often, mugshots are taken after an arrestee has been detained, taken to an unfamiliar environment, subjected to intense questioning for hours on end by complete strangers, and perhaps has missed out on needed nourishment and sleep. No one ever looks good in a mugshot.  The arrestee could be as honest as the day is long, as pure as the driven snow, and universally beloved, and s/he still wouldn't look good in a mugshot.  "Look at his mugshot!  He looks guilty!"  But Mother Theresa wouldn't look good (and might even look guilty) in a mugshot!  For some, that's the whole point of taking a mugshot.

Just sayin'!

And remember: I'm one of the most pro-police, pro-prosecution people you will (n)ever meet in Cyber Space.

P.S.: I see Cal beat me to it!  She usually does! :angry:

;):D

Oh I look bad a lot, no doubt! I can't even imagine how bad I'd look knowing I was being booked and everyone could see my mugshot! Some try to look good and smile etc. But you're right about having a good/bad looking mugshot doesn't mean you're less/more guilty.

 

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  • 3 months later...
On 3/20/2020 at 11:36 AM, Stargazer said:

Yep. My youngest son started developing symptoms of paranoid personality disorder in his mid-teens, and it became quite mature by the time he was 27 or so.  We tried to get him to recognize that his feelings were not normal, but the problem with paranoia is that trying to convince someone with the disorder that there is a problem becomes just one more self-fulfilling "thing" they use to confirm their delusion.

Indeed, we have a family member who nearing sixty now has been convinced since she was 13 the world is out to get her.

Any attempt to work with her or get her 'help' is nothing more than fulfillment of her fears. 

Her daughter is so distraught with all of this that she believes if and when she takes guardianship of her mother that she will have no alternative except to incarcerate behind the locked doors of an adult home specializing in personality disorders.

This is sad.

I truly feel for the horror of the situation of the young man who destroyed his own life as well as the victims.

 

Edited by JamesBYoung
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10 hours ago, JamesBYoung said:

Indeed, we have a family member who nearing sixty now has been convinced since she was 13 the world is out to get her.

Any attempt to work with her or get her 'help' is nothing more than fulfillment of her fears. 

Her daughter is so distraught with all of this that she believes if and when she takes guardianship of her mother that she will have no alternative except to incarcerate behind the locked doors of an adult home specializing in personality disorders.

This is sad.

I truly feel for the horror of the situation of the young man who destroyed three lives as well as the victims.

 

My best friend in middle school was a lovely rambunctious person, yet like sometimes happens, we went our separate ways in high school. I found out last year that she passed away about 5 years ago. Her sister told me that she had begun having symptoms of paranoid schizophrenia in her teens, probably sometime after she and I stopped socializing. Her condition worsened throughout her life until she made safe contact with all of her loved ones impossible. 

It gutted me to think of the loneliness she must have felt with such a condition. My poor friend.

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It should be noted so as not to contribute to any false beliefs of those who might read this that schizophrenics are likely to be no more dangerous than the general population.  And if there is violence other issues are also likely involved, especially alcohol or drug abuse.  
 

https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/aggression-and-impulsivity-schizophrenia

Of course, those who are violent and harm others are the ones noticed by media or portrayed in movies, etc for entertainment  even though much more likely to harm themselves. 

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