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Founder Of Feminist Mormon Housewives Plans To Carry The Ow Torch?


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Lisa Butterworth, who founded Feminist Mormon Housewives a decade ago, teared up on Trib Talk when talking about the excommunication’s impact on her own family.

"My daughters are heartbroken," Butterworth said, "and don’t want to go to church anymore."

The Idaho mom said she had tried to raise feminist issues quietly, politely and behind-the-scenes for years, but it wasn’t until Ordain Women began their activism that LDS leaders paid attention.

"I’m not sure at what point a larger conversation in the church would have taken place if OW had not decided it wouldn’t be so polite," she said. "They have opened up a space for discussion."

Butterworth said she now plans to be more open and bold speaking about the issue at church.

That’s exactly what Kelly hopes will happen.

To Kelly, it’s more like the mythical many-headed Hydra — "they can cut off one head, but another will grow in its place."

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58110298-78/kelly-church-women-mormon.html.csp

 

 

The way I read it, it's as if she approves of OW's methodology and plans to question the Church, instead of ask questions.

 

Questioning vs. Asking Questions

There are basically two different ways we can approach our questions. For our purposes here, we’ll distinguish between these approaches by labeling them questioning and asking questions. When it comes to matters of faith, there can be a pretty big difference between the two. The difference has to do with how and why you’re asking the questions, what you hope to gain from them, and where they’ll eventually lead you.

Questioning, here, refers to challenging, disputing, or picking something apart. When it comes to religion, the result of this approach is often not to find answers but rather to find fault and destroy confidence.

On the other hand, in religion, just as in science or anything else worth studying, it’s absolutely essential to ask questions, even difficult ones. It’s the only way you’ll get answers. And answers mean greater knowledge and understanding—and in the case of religion, greater faith and spirituality.

So, your attitude and your motive in asking a question can make all the difference in where it will eventually lead you. For instance, if you’re studying the scriptures and come across a passage that seems to contradict a Church teaching or a scientific or historical fact, there’s a big difference between asking “How could the scriptures (or the Church) possibly be true if … ?” and asking “What’s the full context of this passage and what does it mean in light of … ?” The first question may lead you to a hastily drawn conclusion based on skepticism and doubt rather than actual knowledge or logic, whereas the second is more likely to lead you to greater insight and faith.

Though this example is a bit extreme, it illustrates how paying attention to the questions you ask and the reasons you ask them can help you to avoid drifting from asking questions into questioning.

 

https://www.lds.org/youth/article/when-you-have-questions?lang=eng

 

 

 

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Please don't vilify her because she was sad about KK and wants to talk/question/discuss women's issues. Both of those things apply to me too and it doesn't have to be so very polarizing. (Still feeling the need to point out that I am not an OW supporter so that my words will be heard).

 

I'm really quite afraid that the results of KK/OW will be that women's issues will by brushed under the rug and ignored as "nonissues." They are issues. They're real. I feel them.

 

As Juliann said, giver her a chance.

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I think the writer of that article is misleading and is fundamentally stating that asking questions is wrong, while using semantics to pretend there is a difference between questioning and asking questions.  I think he is trying to say don't question, without saying don't question.

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A beautiful sentiment but very silly. It is based on the idealistic notion that talking solves more problems than it causes. Sometimes true, sometimes not.

Sometimes the problems are actually solved by talking and oft times not talking about an issue both exacerbates it and creates new ones.

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I think the writer of that article is misleading and is fundamentally stating that asking questions is wrong, while using semantics to pretend there is a difference between questioning and asking questions.  I think he is trying to say don't question, without saying don't question.

You might want to try reading it again as you apparently totally missed the point.

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I think the writer of that article is misleading and is fundamentally stating that asking questions is wrong, while using semantics to pretend there is a difference between questioning and asking questions.  I think he is trying to say don't question, without saying don't question.

 

Asking questions is essential. JS would have never gone into that grove if he didn't have questions. OTOH Where would we be now if JS had asked God "Who are you to tell me what to believe?"

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And sometimes a discussion exacerbates the issue and creates new issues.

Depends where you do the talking. Also depends on whether you want to get on the no request list for giving Sacrament talks.

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