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What Do Lds Think About Suicide?


EllenMaksoud

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Me personally, not sure what will happen. In my pre teens, a friends mom told her that people that do, will face outer darkness, she wasn't LDS..That made an impression on me and probably kept me alive sometimes. Now, I'm not too sure about that scenario. Alzheimer's runs high in my family so if I get that, I'm taking Sky Diving lessons. If I forget to pull the cord, so be it.

Edited by Tacenda
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From lds.org:

Although it is wrong to take one's own life, a person who commits suicide may not be responsible for his or her acts. Only God can judge such a matter. Elder M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles has said:

“Obviously, we do not know the full circumstances surrounding every suicide. Only the Lord knows all the details, and he it is who will judge our actions here on earth.

”When he does judge us, I feel he will take all things into consideration: our genetic and chemical makeup, our mental state, our intellectual capacity, the teachings we have received, the traditions of our fathers, our health, and so forth“ (”Suicide: Some Things We Know, and Some We Do Not,“ Ensign, Oct. 1987, 8).

http://www.lds.org/topics/suicide?lang=eng

http://www.lds.org/ensign/1987/10/suicide-some-things-we-know-and-some-we-do-not?lang=eng

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My uncle committed suicide, for politeness it was referred to as a gun accident. He had a brain tumour that had eaten up a third of his brain and wasn't stopping any time soon and he was going blind because of it so it was understandable. However, his kids were furious because he didn't give them a chance to say goodbye first.

Recently a nonactive young man in the ward blew his brains out on the front lawn of his girlfriend and their daughter's apartment complex because she wouldn't take him back. A young mother of six was discovered dead by her husband a couple of years ago. The response to these were the same as when a woman died of heart failure (apparently due to a potassium imbalance) at a gas station out of the blue or when a father was killed in a car accident...sadness and sympathy and support for the victims and those left behind, no judgment spoken of that I heard.

Every other suicide I've heard about in the Church is met with sympathy for the victim and sadness and sympathy for the victim's loved one and a caution to avoid judgment if thought necessary.

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Me personally, not sure what will happen. In my pre teens, a friends mom told her that people that do, will face outer darkness, she wasn't LDS..That made an impression on me and probably kept me alive sometimes. Now, I'm not too sure about that scenario. Alzheimer's runs high in my family so if I get that, I'm taking Sky Diving lessons. If I forget to pull the cord, so be it.

I know exactly what you mean... my greatest fear is losing my mind to dementia of some type. For years when I was inactive, I had it all planned out... how I was going to commit suicide... my husband was older than I and it was fairly certain I'd be alone for a number of years as I got older (I'm now 72 and have been widowed for 14 years). Since I have no children or any relative nearby, I'm totally on my own. So, for years before I reactivated I had it all planned out... if I found that I had early Alzheimer's, etc., I planned to take a day... get my hair done, a manicure, clean my house spotless, get dressed in my nicest clothes, then go in and lie down after taking a megadose of sleeping pills I had stockpiled... I'd just go to sleep, nothing messy or tragic. I'd leave letters of instruction, particularly what to do with my cat...

Then I reactivated... and I knew I had to reconsider such an action... so I counseled with my bishop, a wise and wonderful man. The result was that I can no longer consider such a suicide as an option. My only course now is to pray that I will be able to maintain my brain and intellect... I'm encouraged because when my mom died at 80 she was still very sharp. My prayer is that I can do the same...

GG

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I know exactly what you mean... my greatest fear is losing my mind to dementia of some type. For years when I was inactive, I had it all planned out... how I was going to commit suicide... my husband was older than I and it was fairly certain I'd be alone for a number of years as I got older (I'm now 72 and have been widowed for 14 years). Since I have no children or any relative nearby, I'm totally on my own. So, for years before I reactivated I had it all planned out... if I found that I had early Alzheimer's, etc., I planned to take a day... get my hair done, a manicure, clean my house spotless, get dressed in my nicest clothes, then go in and lie down after taking a megadose of sleeping pills I had stockpiled... I'd just go to sleep, nothing messy or tragic. I'd leave letters of instruction, particularly what to do with my cat...

Then I reactivated... and I knew I had to reconsider such an action... so I counseled with my bishop, a wise and wonderful man. The result was that I can no longer consider such a suicide as an option. My only course now is to pray that I will be able to maintain my brain and intellect... I'm encouraged because when my mom died at 80 she was still very sharp. My prayer is that I can do the same...

GG

Your brain is so sharp GG. Your posts on the board verify that. I can barely put a sentence together on paper. I'm constantly editing. But that could be stemmed from poor ability too. One thing about my mom was how much she suffered and living with it for 15 yrs. It was so inhumane. They treat animals better and put them down but not people. Of course I see the repercussions of doing that. Or doing what Dr. Kavorkian did (not sure I spelled his name right).
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I have yet to figure out the theme song from MASH " Suicide is Painless ...." It is not, especially for those left to mourn and question why.

That said, I can see reasons for it happening. What I don't readily forgive is the type like a young father who shoots himself in front of his wife and child.That will leave permanent scars.

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I forgot to mention his child was an infant, but when someone tells her the story it will still leave scars. I did have one judgment there...the suicide's chosen location was completely selfish and about making a point. I felt that was totally inappropriate and hard to forgive as you stated. The mother who made sure her kids wouldn't be the ones who found her was a completely different story.

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Me personally, not sure what will happen. In my pre teens, a friends mom told her that people that do, will face outer darkness, she wasn't LDS..That made an impression on me and probably kept me alive sometimes. Now, I'm not too sure about that scenario. Alzheimer's runs high in my family so if I get that, I'm taking Sky Diving lessons. If I forget to pull the cord, so be it.

I've got to remember that one. :D "If I forget to putl the cord, so be it."

As it turns out, you have to take quite a few lessons before they let you jump out without a static line. Or so I have been told.

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The willful taking of an innocent life, including one's own, is akin to murder. (The operative word there is "willful"). In order for one to consider, attempt, or complete suicide, I have to believe that a person generally isn't in his right mind. Thus, I don't think he'll be judged in the same way as if he were in his right mind when he considered, undertook, or completed the action. Only God, who is omniscient, can judge. I believe (and hope) God is far more willing and eager to extend mercy to us than we realize, else why the Atonement of Jesus Christ? God can extend mercy to us, not because of anything we have done or not done, but rather because of what Christ did for us. If the Comforter witnesses to those left behind that a person who died at his own hand will inherit a fate much better than that which his friends and family had feared, who is anyone to second-guess that witness?

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I am generally anti-suicide. There are only a few people for whom I am pro-suicide.

Unfortunately for you, perhaps, that is their decision, not yours. ;)

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I know exactly what you mean... my greatest fear is losing my mind to dementia of some type. For years when I was inactive, I had it all planned out... how I was going to commit suicide... my husband was older than I and it was fairly certain I'd be alone for a number of years as I got older (I'm now 72 and have been widowed for 14 years). Since I have no children or any relative nearby, I'm totally on my own. So, for years before I reactivated I had it all planned out... if I found that I had early Alzheimer's, etc., I planned to take a day... get my hair done, a manicure, clean my house spotless, get dressed in my nicest clothes, then go in and lie down after taking a megadose of sleeping pills I had stockpiled... I'd just go to sleep, nothing messy or tragic. I'd leave letters of instruction, particularly what to do with my cat...

Then I reactivated... and I knew I had to reconsider such an action... so I counseled with my bishop, a wise and wonderful man. The result was that I can no longer consider such a suicide as an option. My only course now is to pray that I will be able to maintain my brain and intellect... I'm encouraged because when my mom died at 80 she was still very sharp. My prayer is that I can do the same...

GG

I (for one of many) am glad you're still here, Garden Girl. :friends: As an aside, caring for parents in their advancing years is their children's opportunity to repay their parents for all the love and care the parents gave the children when they were young. Perhaps I'm simply naive, and certainly not all cases of dementia are created equal, but I think, generally speaking, that dementia is far worse for those watching someone else experience it than it is for the person himself. In my grandmother's case, I got to see a side of her (though, again, each case is different) that I never would have seen otherwise: she was a very reserved, proper woman in her right mind who, because she spent so much of a lifetime with a very strong-willed man, often bit her tongue and rarely said what she thought. Not so as the dementia advanced: she frequently said exactly what she thought, evinced quite a strong will of her own, and displayed an impish sense of humor. I suspect that those traits were much more in evidence when she was younger. :)

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I (for one of many) am glad you're still here, Garden Girl. :friends: As an aside, caring for parents in their advancing years is their children's opportunity to repay their parents for all the love and care the parents gave the children when they were young. Perhaps I'm simply naive, and certainly not all cases of dementia are created equal, but I think, generally speaking, that dementia is far worse for those watching someone else experience it than it is for the person himself. In my grandmother's case, I got to see a side of her (though, again, each case is different) that I never would have seen otherwise: she was a very reserved, proper woman in her right mind who, because she spent so much of a lifetime with a very strong-willed man, often bit her tongue and rarely said what she thought. Not so as the dementia advanced: she frequently said exactly what she thought, evinced quite a strong will of her own, and displayed an impish sense of humor. I suspect that those traits were much more in evidence when she was younger. :)

I understand exactly what you mean. The last year of my MIL's life was like dealing with a bratty teenager. She had dementia, but not Alzheimers, so she recognized those around her, but it was like all the inhibitions of a lifetime were stripped away. Nothing lascivious, in fact she would walk up to a young couple snuggling and let them have it with both barrels for their PDA. I guess you just had to be there, it was endearing, frustrating, and hilarious all at the same time.

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I understand exactly what you mean. The last year of my MIL's life was like dealing with a bratty teenager. She had dementia, but not Alzheimers, so she recognized those around her, but it was like all the inhibitions of a lifetime were stripped away. Nothing lascivious, in fact she would walk up to a young couple snuggling and let them have it with both barrels for their PDA. I guess you just had to be there, it was endearing, frustrating, and hilarious all at the same time.

Yep, that sounds familiar! ;) In hindsight, though, I don't remember as much of the frustration as I do of the endearment and the hilarity. :)

Edited by Kenngo1969
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Before or after the fact?

before, like does he try to stop them or how involved is he? Sometimes you hear about people who go through with it and get to the other side only to be told it isn't your time or get turned back here, yet others commit suicide stay deceased

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For more information on the stance of the Church of Jesus Christ regarding suicide, see here, https://www.lds.org/...do-not?lang=eng, last accessed today. Elder Ballard has expanded this treatment of the topic of suicide into book form. Although I have not yet read it, see here, http://www.deseretbo...llard/i/4718521, last accessed today.

Duncan, I don't understand the interplay between humans' free will, God's foreknowledge, His choosing to intervene in some circumstances (whatever the adverse event is that is about to happen, whether suicide or something else) and His choosing not to intervene in other circumstances. I don't understand what He meant when He said that "all flesh is in [His] hands" (Moses 6:32) or what Paul meant when he said that "all things work together for the good of them that love God" (Romans 8:28). I suspect that sometimes He intervenes and sometimes He doesn't, but I have faith (or try to ... "Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief") that His choice to intervene is based on what will accomplish His purposes, even if I don't understand what those purposes are (see Isaiah 55:8-9).

Edited by Kenngo1969
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