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Baptist Response To Church Essays


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Ditto.

Historic Christianity can very validly be argued to be Catholicism so therefore no Protestant can be Christian. :spiteful:

The term "historic Christianity" makes me think of the apostolic church and, to some degree, the post-apostolic church prior to the formulation of the creeds. I've read some from the Ante-Nicene Fathers, and their words to me seem more consistent with LDS teaching than with anything else.

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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The term "historic Christianity" makes me think of the apostolic church and, to some degree, the post-apostolic church prior to the formulation of the creeds. I've read some from the Ante-Nicene Fathers, and their words to me seem more consistent with LDS teaching than anything else.

Obviously you are interpreting historic incorrectly. If it doesn't agree with Protestantism then it's not historic Christianity. ;)
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Obviously you are interpreting historic incorrectly. If it doesn't agree with Protestantism then it's not historic Christianity. ;)

 

Yeah, even though Sola Fide as understood by many modern day Evangelicals looks nothing like what the early Church fathers taught. N.T. Wright has written a fair amount on the new perspective of Paul, but Catholics and Orthodox say that it's not a "new" perspective at all. 

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I attended a Baptist service by myself last summer, it was ok, but just didn't do it for me. I'm finding it hard to replace my Mormonism. There seems to be nothing I can complain very much about. In our primary last week I just loved singing those songs (practicing for a Christmas program, maybe that's why). It felt good to worship through song, and let it take over my negativity. Anyway, haven't been in the Baptist's Primary age Sunday School maybe it's just as good. But have heard many EV's comment that our youth programs are excellent.

 

May the Lord bless you Tacenda, for your honest and consistent efforts to know His will.

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Have the southern baptists ever said how their mission to utah in 1998 turned out?

They ended up with about a thousand converts, most not LDS.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/faithbased/2007/12/southern_baptists_vs_the_mormons.html

"We are not worried," the Mormon Church's president, Gordon B. Hinckley, declared before the Southern Baptists arrived in Utah that June. In the end, slightly more than 1,000 conversions emerged from the missionary efforts, and SBC officials later acknowledged most of these came from non-Mormons. While the interactions on doorsteps between Southern Baptist missionaries and potential Mormon converts remained congenial—many of the Mormons had themselves served missions for their church and were therefore sympathetic—events at the SBC's meeting were far more heated. One minister opened his sermon to the convention by describing Salt Lake City as "headquarters of a counterfeit Christianity." And a resolution passed affirming "biblical revelation as the sole source of saving truth" struck many observers as a jab at Mormonism's extrabiblical scriptures, including the Book of Mormon.

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They ended up with about a thousand converts, most not LDS.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/faithbased/2007/12/southern_baptists_vs_the_mormons.html

"We are not worried," the Mormon Church's president, Gordon B. Hinckley, declared before the Southern Baptists arrived in Utah that June. In the end, slightly more than 1,000 conversions emerged from the missionary efforts, and SBC officials later acknowledged most of these came from non-Mormons. While the interactions on doorsteps between Southern Baptist missionaries and potential Mormon converts remained congenial—many of the Mormons had themselves served missions for their church and were therefore sympathetic—events at the SBC's meeting were far more heated. One minister opened his sermon to the convention by describing Salt Lake City as "headquarters of a counterfeit Christianity." And a resolution passed affirming "biblical revelation as the sole source of saving truth" struck many observers as a jab at Mormonism's extrabiblical scriptures, including the Book of Mormon.

So it kind if sounds like utah was a gracious host, but that the sbc was not a very gracious guest.
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So it kind if sounds like utah was a gracious host, but that the sbc was not a very gracious guest.

They were preaching to their own choir -- to adapt a figure of speech -- and parroting their party line, as it were. One could hardly expect otherwise, given their history and doctrinal mindset.

 

My vague memory of one of the sessions is an acknowledgment of the effectiveness of LDS Church media campaigns (back then, that amounted, for the most part, to public service announcements placed with radio and television stations) and the suggestion that Baptist congregations needed to try something similar.

 

I don't recall there being any harsh interactions to speak of with local Latter-day Saints. At one point, I took a copy of the Book of Mormon into the Salt Palace and wandered the lobbies and halls with the book prominently displayed, wondering if that would spark any conversation. Not a single soul accosted me.

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I recall a crew of these miscreants (-. showed up at our church building, but wouldn't stay for the whole block. They took a couple of my friends aside, shut the door and proceeded to explain where we were wrong. I don't know how the side meeting came about--there was probably some discussion happening and all parties felt it appropriate to take it behind closed doors.

I was in a single's ward back then and the crew that showed were people our age. DOn't know if they were invited or what, but it was an event enough, I guess to stick in my memory.

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They were preaching to their own choir -- to adapt a figure of speech -- and parroting their party line, as it were. One could hardly expect otherwise, given their history and doctrinal mindset.

My vague memory of one of the sessions is an acknowledgment of the effectiveness of LDS Church media campaigns (back then, that amounted, for the most part, to public service announcements placed with radio and television stations) and the suggestion that Baptist congregations needed to try something similar.

I don't recall there being any harsh interactions to speak of with local Latter-day Saints. At one point, I took a copy of the Book of Mormon into the Salt Palace and wandered the lobbies and halls with the book prominently displayed, wondering if that would spark any conversation. Not a single soul accosted me.

My parents were service missionaries at Temple Square where they showed the gardens to visitors. They said the visitors from the SBC were pretty gracious and mainly just taking a tour of Utah's largest tourist attraction.

My mom said there were one or two that told other volunteers they would be praying for their souls, and the missionaries responded that they appreciated a good prayer.

I had an institute teacher who told me there were several conversions from the group to the LDS faith, but I have no idea of that veracity. They have been known to tell a good story.

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My mom said there were one or two that told other volunteers they would be praying for their souls, and the missionaries responded that they appreciated a good prayer.

 

 

Good for those missionaries!

 

This is a typical Mormon mindset and quite a contrast from those who get hostile when they learn that non-binding proxy ordinances are performed in our temples in behalf of people who have died. (Please see my sig line, the portion in gray type.)

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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Good for those missionaries!

This is a typical Mormon mindset and quite a contrast from those who get hostile when they learn that non-binding proxy ordinances are performed in our temples in behalf of people who have died. (Please see my sig line, the portion in gray type.)

I'm on a phone so I can't see it, but I have in the past.

You may have known my dad, he used to contribute a weekly column to the Deseret News, and had a book published by Deseret Book about the gardens at Temple Square.

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They were preaching to their own choir -- to adapt a figure of speech -- and parroting their party line, as it were. One could hardly expect otherwise, given their history and doctrinal mindset.

My vague memory of one of the sessions is an acknowledgment of the effectiveness of LDS Church media campaigns (back then, that amounted, for the most part, to public service announcements placed with radio and television stations) and the suggestion that Baptist congregations needed to try something similar.

I don't recall there being any harsh interactions to speak of with local Latter-day Saints. At one point, I took a copy of the Book of Mormon into the Salt Palace and wandered the lobbies and halls with the book prominently displayed, wondering if that would spark any conversation. Not a single soul accosted me.

I get that and it doesn't bother me.

I just found it kind of humorous. "Thanks for being such a great host, sorry you're going to hell." :D

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I attended a Baptist service by myself last summer, it was ok, but just didn't do it for me.

 

Attending a Baptist Sunday school actually played a small role in propelling me towards serving a mission. I was a first-year university student in America, and I thought it was time to go exploring. I knew without reservation that what I had found in the restored Church of Jesus Christ was good because I had tested it and lived it and watched it work exactly as it should. It consistently, reliably, and predictably brought forth in my life and in the lives of others whom I'd observed the promised fruits found in scripture ... satisfying that deep place in my heart that desires everything good. What I did not yet know, however, was whether other people were obtaining these same blessings in other ways. In my mind, it seemed that it would make sense to expend a good deal of labour trying to share something only if that something was uniquely of benefit. So off I went to other churches, campus fellowships and ministries, and even Islamic and Buddhist gatherings -- whatever I could find around me.

 

My final visit was to a Baptist church with my friend, T------. When I first asked her if I could go to church with her one Sunday, I naturally assumed she'd be thrilled to take me along, but she wasn't. She was scared, she said, that I would say or do something that would embarrass her. I promised I wouldn't, and in the end, the only way I could 'buy' my way into Sunday school (and not just the standard worship service) was to promise that I wouldn't say a single word to anyone but her.

 

The lesson that morning, taught by the assistant pastor, centred on the story of Joseph, sold into Egypt. After discussing all the vicissitudes that had befallen this faithful follower of righteousness, the pastor asked the assembled adults why God would allow Joseph to experience such things. Silence. Long, painful silence. Meanwhile dozens of answers exploded in my head: the necessity of opposition for agency to be operable, the refining power of adversity, the need for opportunities to exercise faith, the knowledge of God that comes only 'in our extremities', 2 Nephi 2, Doctrine and Covenants 122, talks by Elder Maxwell, and on and on. I looked at T------; her look said, You promised me, so I sat silent, waiting for the pastor's erudite answer. He shrugged his shoulders and said, 'Sometimes God's ways are mysterious, and we just have to trust Him'.

 

My sole thought as we drove home after the worship service later that afternoon: Everyone should have access to what I have. Everyone.

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Attending a Baptist Sunday school actually played a small role in propelling me towards serving a mission. I was a first-year university student in America, and I thought it was time to go exploring. I knew without reservation that what I had found in the restored Church of Jesus Christ was good because I had tested it and lived it and watched it work exactly as it should. It consistently, reliably, and predictably brought forth in my life and in the lives of others whom I'd observed the promised fruits found in scripture ... satisfying that deep place in my heart that desires everything good. What I did not yet know, however, was whether other people were obtaining these same blessings in other ways. In my mind, it seemed that it would make sense to expend a good deal of labour trying to share something only if that something was uniquely of benefit. So off I went to other churches, campus fellowships and ministries, and even Islamic and Buddhist gatherings -- whatever I could find around me.

My final visit was to a Baptist church with my friend, T------. When I first asked her if I could go to church with her one Sunday, I naturally assumed she'd be thrilled to take me along, but she wasn't. She was scared, she said, that I would say or do something that would embarrass her. I promised I wouldn't, and in the end, the only way I could 'buy' my way into Sunday school (and not just the standard worship service) was to promise that I wouldn't say a single word to anyone but her.

The lesson that morning, taught by the assistant pastor, centred on the story of Joseph, sold into Egypt. After discussing all the vicissitudes that had befallen this faithful follower of righteousness, the pastor asked the assembled adults why God would allow Joseph to experience such things. Silence. Long, painful silence. Meanwhile dozens of answers exploded in my head: the necessity of opposition for agency to be operable, the refining power of adversity, the need for opportunities to exercise faith, the knowledge of God that comes only 'in our extremities', 2 Nephi 2, Doctrine and Covenants 122, talks by Elder Maxwell, and on and on. I looked at T------; her look said, You promised me, so I sat silent, waiting for the pastor's erudite answer. He shrugged his shoulders and said, 'Sometimes God's ways are mysterious, and we just have to trust Him'.

My sole thought as we drove home after the worship service later that afternoon: Everyone should have access to what I have. Everyone.

We do have some very scriptural/spiritual giants in this church Hamba, thanks for sharing.
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http://www.bpnews.net/43783/mormons-grappling-with-their-history

 

I've noticed that several essays have been published by Southern Baptist sources saying that with the Church's essays, this is a good time to bring benighted Mormons to the "true gospel" of the Southern Baptists. Among things being said is that God never condoned polygamy, and that the LDS leaders are unable to keep members form leaving in a mass exodus. They referred concerned individuals to the works of the Tanners. Aside from being condescending, I'm not sure if members will be joining the SBC in droves due to polygamy essays being published....what do you guys think?

The baptists probably have enough problems with their own membership to worry about what is going on across the street in another building.

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Southern Baptists don't even like Southern Baptists.

 

Of course living here in North Georgia I see Baptists like Salt Lake City sees Mormons.  Cultures are much prettier if you live outside of their reactor cores.

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http://www.bpnews.net/43783/mormons-grappling-with-their-history

 

I've noticed that several essays have been published by Southern Baptist sources saying that with the Church's essays, this is a good time to bring benighted Mormons to the "true gospel" of the Southern Baptists. Among things being said is that God never condoned polygamy, and that the LDS leaders are unable to keep members form leaving in a mass exodus. They referred concerned individuals to the works of the Tanners. Aside from being condescending, I'm not sure if members will be joining the SBC in droves due to polygamy essays being published....what do you guys think?

 

 

Ahhh the dear lovely SBCs.  They are more delueded than they think Mormons are. I wonder how many of them have evaluated their own beliefs with the same scrutiny and methods the hurl up at Mormons.  My guess is....a very few.

 

They think they have truth?  the poor foolish souls.....

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... They think they have truth?  the poor foolish souls.....

They do.  Here are more of my thoughts on that matter: https://greatgourdini.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/toward-interreligious-oneness/

 

https://greatgourdini.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/toward-interreligious-oneness/

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Ahhh the dear lovely SBCs.  They are more delueded than they think Mormons are. I wonder how many of them have evaluated their own beliefs with the same scrutiny and methods the hurl up at Mormons.  My guess is....a very few.

 

They think they have truth?  the poor foolish souls.....

My member best friend is reading the BOM with her Baptist husband. He's noticing some of the flaws in the BOM and annoyed me with a comment the other day of  "It's always 'This is true and this is true.' It's like a cool kid trying to convince you he is cool when he's not." I don't think he meant to say it in front of me, but it was annoying.  <_< We'll just have to agree to disagree.

Then the guy is a young earth creationist like my BF. Probably hasn't even acknowledged the anachronisms in the OT and keeps away from modern scholarship that would contradict some of his fundamentalist views.

The people closest to me don't read like I do so maybe I'm just being a snob though.  :angel:  

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Ahhh the dear lovely SBCs. They are more delueded than they think Mormons are. I wonder how many of them have evaluated their own beliefs with the same scrutiny and methods the hurl up at Mormons. My guess is....a very few.

They think they have truth? the poor foolish souls.....

Oh stahp. Do you ever think it's possible for someone to be in error but still not deluded?

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