Jump to content

Fair Mormon's new YouTube branding strategy


Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Ipod Touch said:

I think it is great too.

I also think that believing Church members should also have a place and means to "blow off steam" as well.  When you "blow off steam" by dumping on someone's deeply held religious convictions, then it should come as no when steam is blown back in your direction from time to time.

I'm just really tired of this big-bad-Church narrative.  People blame the Church when, in fact, they simply have dysfunctional families/relationships. If a person's family chooses to make their exit from the Church difficult, that's not a Church problem, your family sucks.

If your Mormon friends abandon you when you leave, they are crappy people and bad friends.  Mormonism has nothing to do with it.

Exmos need to take responsibility for their own lives and happiness and stop blaming the Church for all their problems.

I have family members who have left, and those relationships are no different now than before.  We are actually closer now than before (not because they left of course but because they fixed other issues in their life at the same time).

But it’s a lot easier for some to blame “the church” for issues related to leaving than to admit that their family is dysfunctional (and not because of the church).

The church is an emotionally safer entity to blame.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
5 minutes ago, jkwilliams said:

Apparently, you haven't been through this process. Acknowledging that, even in the best family situations, leaving the church is difficult and painful (by design) is not "blaming the church" for all our problems. What a silly post.

I've been an exmo for 10 years.  I know exactly what I'm talking about.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
1 hour ago, bluebell said:

Thanks so much for clarifying!

So did Dehlin actually contact Cardon after he called 911?  I’m not trying to rub salt into wounds, it’s a sincere question. I’m confused on what is actually known about the incident and what isn’t. 

The time stamp I saw on the request to be on the show was at 6:30ish am on that morning, so I believed he called the police or said he called the police after that. From what I could tell, he did not ask them to clarify what they meant by retweeting the meme.  I believe Ellis’ show was recorded around 2PM. Can’t remember why I think that. But I remember a meme or something about him calling police because he hadn’t got a response after 5 hours. I can’t guarantee the timeline, but I am confident enough about the order. 

Dehlin posted about the meme late the 4th, texted early the following morning, waited a few hours while taking about what he should do online, etc. and then allegedly called the police. A few hours later Ellis makes a show about it and offers his response to come in the show. 
 

Apparently there are some people who see Deznat as a semi militia and that is who Dehlin fears, though I have no clue why. Haven’t read enough to see if they do anything but talk politics and religion and make memes, from relatively moderate stuff to some extreme racism.

Nor does it appear he mentioned them when he did call. 
 

Edited by Calm
  • Like 3
Link to post

I have heard Kate Kelly has accepted an offer to go on the MM show, haven’t heard if it has been agreed or not for Dehlin. I would not be the least surprised for him to go on it after waiting long enough to make it appear his fears have been addressed. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
29 minutes ago, bluebell said:

I have family members who have left, and those relationships are no different now than before.  We are actually closer now than before (not because they left of course but because they fixed other issues in their life at the same time).

But it’s a lot easier for some to blame “the church” for issues related to leaving than to admit that their family is dysfunctional (and not because of the church).

The church is an emotionally safer entity to blame.

My relationships with my family members are closer, too, but it was a painful, difficult process to leave the church. I broke my mother's heart. I know that, and I take responsibility for it. But I don't know why anyone would say that church teachings and policies somehow make it easy and painless for family members and friends to deal with someone who leaves. Imagine a believing high priest announcing to his wife over dinner, "Oh, by the way, dear, I've lost faith in the church and am resigning." "Oh, well, thanks for telling me, honey. Pass the potatoes."

Link to post
2 hours ago, Ipod Touch said:

Sure, what? I don't follow.  You don't think I'm a former Church member?

I chose to leave the LDS Church following Prop 8 in CA.

It’s impossible to have left the church if you support the idea that there should be a single standard for behavior. 🙃
 

There is an ignore function on the board. I’m adding a couple of the more passive aggressive pot stirrers in this debate. 

Edited by juliann
Link to post
Just now, Ipod Touch said:

But aren't you doing the same thing?  Leaving was hard for you, so it must be hard for everyone?

Nope. I recognize it's easy for some, such as you, apparently, but it's clearly not designed to be. 

Link to post
4 minutes ago, juliann said:

It’s impossible to have left the church if you support the idea that there should be a single standard for our behavior.
 

There is an ignore function on the board. I’m adding a couple of the more passive aggressive pot stirrers in this debate. 

I don't expect any single standard. That's my objection here, that people are saying leaving the church is only difficult if you have a dysfunctional family. That's ridiculous.

  • Like 3
Link to post
14 hours ago, Hanna Seariac said:

I saw a lot of talk about my Twitter activity, so thought I would respond. Threads of mine have already been shared here and I still agree with them. I did an all my views post a while ago, where I condemned white supremacy and white nationalism entirely (I have never thought racism was acceptable, please feel free to comb through my very public presence on Twitter, Medium, and Facebook and read my material; the vast majority of my content is well within the boundaries that the Church has set. My minimal political posting has been critical of progressives and of the alt-right. 

Here's an example of my typical content: https://hseariac.medium.com/social-justice-in-zion-f3969e54d55a 

My rule of thumb with tweeting is this: if a tweet is a good tweet, I will retweet it, but I am not responsible for all that person's views. I'm friendly with a lot of people on Twitter and elsewhere. Even if you *really* disagree with me, I am friendly with you. My only exceptions here are if you've tried to commit a crime against me or my friends or you false accuse me and my friends of crimes or you exclusively try to tear down the Church. Even then I am direct, but certainly quite polite still. I see no reason not to be friendly with as many people as possible and be kind. I have cultivated many relationships this way with people from progressive to fundamentalist religiously and of many political persuasions. I'm really influenced by Daryl Davis' approach to getting to know people. 

If you're really invested in seeing my Twitter, look at it for yourself and judge the tweets if you feel so inclined to do that: https://twitter.com/HannaSeariac If you even want to ask me about any of my views, feel free to DM me there. I'm a pretty open person. Personally, I think we need more kindness and communication, not less. That's what I'm committed to doing while still putting God first. 

Thanks for this explanation. I'm very disgusted with the character assassination I have seen surrounding all of this. I knew nothing about Kwaku before but almost everything I have seen alleged in an effort to destroy him has been shown to been manufactured. I'm ashamed I took it seriously at first. And it appears to be the same with this DezNat stuff, whatever it may be, it is being used as a handy character assasination tool. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
5 minutes ago, jkwilliams said:

I don't expect any single standard. That's my objection here, that people are saying leaving the church is only difficult if you have a dysfunctional family. That's ridiculous.

One poster said it based on his experience. You are coming here to nitpick and derail now. 

Link to post
37 minutes ago, Ipod Touch said:

Sure, what? I don't follow.  You don't think I'm a former Church member?

I chose to leave the LDS Church following Prop 8 in CA.

We refer to the one liner derail posts as "drive bys." Don't bite. 

Link to post
Just now, juliann said:

One poster said it based on his experience. You are coming here to nitpick and derail now. 

I'm just responding to this, which is ridiculous:

People blame the Church when, in fact, they simply have dysfunctional families/relationships. If a person's family chooses to make their exit from the Church difficult, that's not a Church problem, your family sucks.

There's nothing passive-aggressive or pot-stirring in responding to this blanket statement. 

Link to post
Just now, bluebell said:

I'm not trying to say the bold.  I have no doubt that leaving would be difficult and painful for some (and for their families).  And surely not something done lightly.  I'm speaking to those who claim that it is difficult because the church causes the families of those who leave to treat them badly.  There's a difference between being treated badly for a decision, and conflict or heartache that comes naturally from a decision.  I'm speaking to the first and not the second. 

If you're family treats you badly after you leave, it's not because the church caused them to do that.  It's because of their own weaknesses and issues. 

Of course a wife would be devastated if her husband announced he was leaving.  And that devastation would be completely rational and reasonable given what the marriage had been built from (namely religious beliefs and covenants).  Anytime a relationship has to be reworked down to the studs (so to speak), that's going to be difficult, for everyone but especially for the person that did not cause the change but must deal with the consequences.   

But that difficulty is not because the church is a cult that makes it hard to leave.  It's because when you change the building bricks that a marriage was created on (regardless of what those building bricks were) and when you change the way that a husband and wife are yoked together, it's going to be hard for a while as adjustments are learned.

I completely agree with that. My issue was with the statement that "if a person's family chooses to make their exit from the Church difficult, that's not a Church problem, your family sucks." That's not about families treating their loved ones badly, but families making an exit "difficult." As you say, leaving the church is almost always going to be difficult, no matter how understanding one's family is. I didn't say anything about the church being a cult, which is a description I've always objected to. But it does seem to me that it's difficult to leave by design, and that's probably because the church sees leaving as such a negative outcome for someone's life. Nothing to do with cults. 

I've known plenty of ex-Mormons who blame all their personal issues on the church, but to me it's silly to suggest that nothing the church does or teaches contributes to the difficulty of leaving. I'd say the same about Catholicism or Methodism or any other religion. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
1 hour ago, Ipod Touch said:

I think it is great too.

I also think that believing Church members should also have a place and means to "blow off steam" as well.  When you "blow off steam" by dumping on someone's deeply held religious convictions, then it should come as no when steam is blown back in your direction from time to time.

I'm just really tired of this big-bad-Church narrative.  People blame the Church when, in fact, they simply have dysfunctional families/relationships. If a person's family chooses to make their exit from the Church difficult, that's not a Church problem, your family sucks.

If your Mormon friends abandon you when you leave, they are crappy people and bad friends.  Mormonism has nothing to do with it.

Exmos need to take responsibility for their own lives and happiness and stop blaming the Church for all their problems.

 This has felt like a return to our beginnings. In the early days of the web in the 90s it was all evangelicals and their ministries and anti-Mormon films and church classes accompanied by some very nasty exmos. It was brutal and they had control of the very limited posting areas when AOL was king. This has felt so much like that with the important distinction that detractors don't have control anymore. What I have seen throughout is the unreasoned resentment of not having that control, that all that is now available is a better argument and louder attacks. This message board has seen quite an evolution and it's survival is notable.  

  • Like 2
Link to post

FairMormon's response  https://www.fairmormon.org/blog/2020/12/08/fairmormon-statement-regarding-this-is-the-show-videos

mqdefault.jpg

Recently FairMormon released a new set of videos titled “This is The Show” on our YouTube channel. These videos use comedy and caricature to address criticisms of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They are intended for a youth and young adult audience as part of our efforts to provide accurate, well-documented answers to criticisms of the doctrine, practice and history of the Church.

In response to these videos, some individuals have made incorrect claims and accusations we wish to address.

First, some have claimed that other groups collaborated with FairMormon on these videos. This is false.  FairMormon commissioned the production of “This is The Show” videos without prompting, input, suggestion or direction from any other entity or individual. No other group has contributed to the content, style, performance, production, or distribution of our videos. FairMormon alone is responsible for the content shared on the videos, and our websites.

Second, some have accused FairMormon of distributing a meme with intent to incite violence. This is also false. We did not create or distribute the meme in question, nor did we ask anyone (directly or indirectly) to create or distribute such a meme. We do not know the individual who created the meme. We have nothing whatever to do with meme, and we do not condone it in any way. FairMormon abhors violence in all of its forms and condemns anything that would invite or incite violence towards anyone—including our critics. We regret that any personalities associated with FairMormon may have shared such content.  We will review our social media policy with our FairMormon associates and contractors.

FairMormon is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing well-documented, accurate, authoritative, and complete answers to criticisms of and questions on the doctrine, policies, practices, and history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The overwhelming bulk of our work is set forward in well-documented articles and lectures. “This is The Show” video series isn’t a change in our course, It’s our first attempt to support young people—using means, methods, and media commonly familiar to them—in their efforts to understand and defend sincere and insincere questions or attacks on their faith and beliefs. For further information, please visit our FAQ page.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
1 hour ago, jkwilliams said:

I wouldn't say there's no getting out, but as my therapist once said, "They don't make it easy to leave, do they?" (And no, my saying so does not imply approval of that silly graphic from reddit.)

I assume that "they" refers to family and friends... Do your feelings for them (e.g. a sense of loss, or not wanting to hurt or disappoint them) make it "not easy" to leave, or do they express feelings or do things that make it "not easy" to leave (if so what kinds of feelings and things)? Or both, maybe... What makes it "not easy"?

Link to post
55 minutes ago, CV75 said:

I assume that "they" refers to family and friends... Do your feelings for them (e.g. a sense of loss, or not wanting to hurt or disappoint them) make it "not easy" to leave, or do they express feelings or do things that make it "not easy" to leave (if so what kinds of feelings and things)? Or both, maybe... What makes it "not easy"?

Delete

Edited by jkwilliams
Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...