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Social media and empolyment.


poptart

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Had an interesting conversation with a friend, apparently now a lack of any social media is a red flag to most employers now.  He admitted that while he would often ask why many others he knows won't even give job hunters the time of day.  I started doing some research and came across this.

https://www.asalesguy.com/told-coming-no-social-media-presence-no-job/

Also asked a cousin, apparently his wife's employer asked for her facebook password as a condition of employment, I cannot believe this is allowed to fly.  Besides being unethical, if an employer was to find out that a potential employee was of a different religion, had a mixed race child or was LGBT I would think this could end with the employer on the ugly end of an expensive lawsuit. 

Thoughts on this? 

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Purchasing a car or a home cannot be done at a reasonable rate without a good FICO score, and credit checks are immediately made online.

A potential renter or girlfriend/boyfriend/spouse ought to be vetted with professional background check first -- online, for a reasonable fee.

Employers should be able to refer immediately to all that and more:  LinkedIn, for example, though some social media stuff (like Facebook) is probably not worth looking at, except to get a general impression (not professional at all).  Employers need to be able verify all claims made in one's resume (experience, degrees, certificates, etc.).  If one has a publishing presence online (books and articles), so much the better. 

This is especially true of those applying for sensitive jobs, such as teaching, nursing, therapist, banker, law enforcement, etc.  One needs to weed out the bad people early.  We had a police chief here in town who was hired without the proper vetting and turned out to be a serial sex abuser.  He came here from far away, and a simple background check in his former town could have avoided a lot of damage.  We can no longer depend upon someone's word or our intuition.  Too much is at stake.

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1 hour ago, Robert F. Smith said:

Purchasing a car or a home cannot be done at a reasonable rate without a good FICO score, and credit checks are immediately made online.

A potential renter or girlfriend/boyfriend/spouse ought to be vetted with professional background check first -- online, for a reasonable fee.

Employers should be able to refer immediately to all that and more:  LinkedIn, for example, though some social media stuff (like Facebook) is probably not worth looking at, except to get a general impression (not professional at all).  Employers need to be able verify all claims made in one's resume (experience, degrees, certificates, etc.).  If one has a publishing presence online (books and articles), so much the better. 

This is especially true of those applying for sensitive jobs, such as teaching, nursing, therapist, banker, law enforcement, etc.  One needs to weed out the bad people early.  We had a police chief here in town who was hired without the proper vetting and turned out to be a serial sex abuser.  He came here from far away, and a simple background check in his former town could have avoided a lot of damage.  We can no longer depend upon someone's word or our intuition.  Too much is at stake.

Here's my concern, with social media it makes it all to easy for someone to discriminate.  With police, nursing and other such positions a background check should suffice, esp. For a nurse.  Its so easy to loose your license, just having it means you're probably a bit more reliable than a lot of the general population.  

The whole turning down someone for a lack of it disturbs me and from.what i can gleam is a uniquely american thing. We have no real safety net here, its so easy to end up homeless.  Besides the anger this will cause an already bitter populace should be addressed, people are snapping as it is.

Also, from a nursing/medical point of view thats a bad idea.  They get paid little as it is.  Malpractice keeps getting worse and education keeps going up.  Like people in the trades doctors and nurses have an easy time going abroad where things like malpractice aren't such an issue.  If Americans keep this up they're going to have a huge shortage of qualified people, even more than they already have.  Cant have your cake and eat it too.

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1 hour ago, Tacenda said:

There is a function on FB to hide your friends on your profile. At least I hope so, or I'm under the false impression that mine are. Employers like to look at who/what your friends are about before hiring you, I hear.

Story for you, my cousins wife was asked for her facebook password at the end of an interview last year, i googled it and was scared by what i saw.  From what ive heard from friends in senior managment, if they can't see everything it can be a red flag.  Thing is jobs, especially ones that pay a living wage are becoming scarce so employers do stuff like that.  I get it, employers don't want someone whos a liability working for them but this is ridiculous, that and it could backfire.  When i had social media i would share things from the lgbt community esp. If it had to do.with homeless youth.  If you live in a city like Seattle and identify as LGBT you can easily be an HR nightmare.  Id seen people there claim sexual discrimination and the lawyers came out of the woodwork, that and of course saying their employer/person they interviewed with was homophobic.  In the west coast that stuff can ruin you so fast, considering more and more men are coming out/identifying as trans this is a great way for people to capitalize on employers unfairly using social media against people.  It's dirty but hey, thats just how things are now.

 

So happy i changed fields, don't have to deal with any of that.  I love my comfy, self imposed bubble.

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1 hour ago, poptart said:

Here's my concern, with social media it makes it all to easy for someone to discriminate.  With police, nursing and other such positions a background check should suffice, esp. For a nurse.  Its so easy to loose your license, just having it means you're probably a bit more reliable than a lot of the general population.  

The whole turning down someone for a lack of it disturbs me and from.what i can gleam is a uniquely american thing. We have no real safety net here, its so easy to end up homeless.  Besides the anger this will cause an already bitter populace should be addressed, people are snapping as it is.

Also, from a nursing/medical point of view thats a bad idea.  They get paid little as it is.  Malpractice keeps getting worse and education keeps going up.  Like people in the trades doctors and nurses have an easy time going abroad where things like malpractice aren't such an issue.  If Americans keep this up they're going to have a huge shortage of qualified people, even more than they already have.  Cant have your cake and eat it too.

Yeh, but you should hear the sob stories from landlords who failed to do a background check on potential renters.  When they turn out to be the renters from Hell, it is almost impossible to get them evicted in a reasonable time.  And, if a new employee turns out to be mister or miss sticky fingers, what do you do?  Hiring can be expensive, and wrongful termination suits a bear.  Then what about the boyfriend or girlfriend who turns out to be an abuser of some sort, with a criminal record?  Nightmare.  Anybody can be a perpetrator.  Anybody can be a victim.  You can't tell the players without a scorecard.

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1 hour ago, Tacenda said:

There is a function on FB to hide your friends on your profile. At least I hope so, or I'm under the false impression that mine are. Employers like to look at who/what your friends are about before hiring you, I hear.

Almost forgot to mention, law enforcement has tools to bypass facebook settings.  With all the crazy stuff happening now even law enforcement gets curious about a suspect with no social.media. 

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Just now, Robert F. Smith said:

Yeh, but you should hear the sob stories from landlords who failed to do a background check on potential renters.  When they turn out to be the renters from Hell, it is almost impossible to get them evicted in a reasonable time.  And, if a new employee turns out to be mister or miss sticky fingers, what do you do?  Hiring can be expensive, and wrongful termination suits a bear.  Then what about the boyfriend or girlfriend who turns out to be an abuser of some sort, with a criminal record?  Nightmare.  Anybody can be a perpetrator.  Anybody can be a victim.  You can't tell the players without a scorecard.

I agree with you 100%.  That was why the landlords i knew in WA did month to month leases with strict rules about drugs, overnight guests and children.  They would sublet out rooms, usually 6 to a house.  Don't even get me started on back ground checks, known my share of slimeballs who tried to exploit me.  Problem when you're poor, finding good people is very, very difficult.  The ward and churches i went to gave me the cold shoulder.  Flip side is churches get exploited a lot nowadays.  People just suck anymore.

 

Can you at least see where im coming from? A lot of us didnt get to grow up ij safe white suburbs, esp. Nowadays many people grow up in very miserable households full of violence and drug abuse, i did.  Worst part is no one cares, that selfish attitude keeps getting worse.  For someone like me who's been stepped on a lot and had to change fields, i don't have a lot of love for people in the lower 48s.  Considering the malpractice insurance i need, cost of education and low wages, yeah the motivation to stay in the states vs. Going abroad as a traveling nurse and not need malpractice insurance like i do here is very appealing.  That's the point i was trying to get across.  Its disgusting how mean and cruel people are getting, lots of us have had it and are looking ways to lessen the risk and increase our income.  I think people here are going to learn the hard way what happens when you bite the hand that feeds you, its going to be their children who suffer the most.

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My husband is very much an introvert so he has no desire to do social media. When he heard about the employer password thing he figured that was another reason to stay off.

Hasn't heard having no social media was a problem. Luckily he hasn't been asked and several years ago we found out you can get more frequent flier miles if you have it sometimes so we created accounts for him just for that.  I am his only "friend".

 

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I thought the courts rules that an employer (or potential employer) could not demand social media passwords from their employees/potential employees?

Edit: Just did some basic google searching and it looks like the courts haven’t weighed in yet, just a few state laws making it illegal. All the articles on the first results page were years old though, so who knows, maybe it’s changed since.

Edited by silvermoon383
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I have never heard of this.  That’s not to say it couldn’t happen-

that being said I’m confident that in general, moderation in all things is best.  My life is much better without Facebook- going on three months now.  I entertain this site and a small Instagram account, and am prudent about everything I post.  Not to come off as a perfect Polly lol- but seriously if I can shut off face book anyone can. And if anyone agrees to use social media they should assume the whole world can access it. Imo. 

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23 hours ago, poptart said:

Had an interesting conversation with a friend, apparently now a lack of any social media is a red flag to most employers now. 

I think it depends on the kind of job you are talking about. If I were looking to hire someone for my marketing team, for example, I would probably be a little hesitant about hiring someone who didn't have a strong social media background. If I were hiring an accountant though, it probably wouldn't bother me as much.

 

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Also asked a cousin, apparently his wife's employer asked for her facebook password as a condition of employment, I cannot believe this is allowed to fly. 

I would probably simply respond that sharing my password would be a violation of Facebook's EULA which I have agreed to follow. Certainly you aren't asking me to engage in an ethics violation as a condition of employment...

 

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Thoughts on this? 

I can understand wanting to have as much information about an individual as possible before offering him a position. In addition to background checks, my company does a social media investigation on perspective employees as well. I've never had one turn up any red flags that would make me want to change my mind about a candidate, but I suppose if it were a close pick between two similarly qualified individuals, what you find out about them through social media might end up being the tipping point for one over the other.

 

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There are states looking at laws prohibiting asking for social meda passwords.    And it is a pretty safe bet that if they are asking for passwords, they've already done some looking for you online.

My response would be to ask what they wanted it for, and details of their request.   If the request was explained in a way that left me still thinking I wanted to work with/for them, I would offer to use my own password on the spot for them to look at (or offer to return to give them the option of looking through after they made me an offer, that they could make contingent on my opening whatever accounts they wanted on my own device to let them search in my presence.)   But I would not be giving them my passwords.

And if I did give them a password, I would give them a reasonable time to use it, and then change the passwords (easy enough to do these days if you have set up the password manager that everyone should have nowadays ---  lastpass or 1password

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On 9/15/2019 at 7:04 PM, poptart said:

it could backfire.  When i had social media i would share things from the lgbt community esp. If it had to do.with homeless youth.  If you live in a city like Seattle and identify as LGBT you can easily be an HR nightmare.  Id seen people there claim sexual discrimination and the lawyers came out of the woodwork, that and of course saying their employer/person they interviewed with was homophobic. 

Some of my early work was in HR and I am shocked to hear that employers would ask for a potential employee's facebook password, particularly after the interview but before extending a job offer. Employers cannot discriminate against any member of a protected class (race/religion/age/disability/sexual orientation in some places/etc), and social media is FILLED with information that could link potential employees to any of those categories. What if a potential employee has a disability that was not apparent in the interview, but the disability was obvious on the facebook page? And what if that potential employee wasn't hired, and another candidate who appeared to have similar qualifications (or less) was hired instead? That employer opened the door to a discrimination case.

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