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truth a la carte

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    Feasting in my picky way

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  1. Any guesses about the impacts of the coronavirus lockdown on LDS membership and activity rates? We often hear that people turn to religion in times of trouble (“there are no atheists in foxholes”) but, with coronavirus, I’ve heard the concern that some people won’t return to their previous levels of church activity, even after things get back to normal.
  2. I don't believe any of the girls were upset, just young and exhausted. (Though, to be honest, I was quite upset with the situation after the long drive home.)
  3. A return to the previous ages for Womens' Conference is good. With such a varied audience, I felt that the speakers were placed in a difficult position; some tried to give talks for everyone in attendance (girls and women age 8+), and the resulting messages were sometimes unfocused and didn't really resonate well. Others targeted their messages to the traditional age group (age 12+), which was nice for most of us, but then the younger girls were left out and restless. Also, I'm on the East Coast so we're two hours behind those of you on MST; the meeting started at 8pm. And our stake really pushed "gathering at the stake center" for these meetings. The first year my daughter attended, at age 8, she cried the entire 35-minute drive home in utter exhaustion (we never again joined the stake for this gathering). When I asked around it was clear that my daughter was not the only girl that had such trouble. I was RS President at the time and our presidency strongly suggested to families in our ward that they avoid the stake center gathering if they had young girls, and suggested that they instead gather in small groups in people's homes (with the young girls in pajamas) and bring treats to share. That solved many of the issues, but the main issue (that the meeting didn't really meet the needs of young girls) was still a problem. I'm glad for this update
  4. Our ward had a great scouting program, the best I've seen in any ward I've been in. The leaders were excellent and loved scouting, and (most of) the boys loved scouting as well. When it was announced that the Church would be separating from scouting, the scout leaders put together a timeline, outlining exactly what needed to be accomplished and by what date . The timeline was simple but extremely thorough, and included all advancements and time-based requirements, as well as the number of campouts that the boys needed to go on. Just about all the boys in our ward earned their Eagles who (a) had started scouting in time, and (b) would have earned their Eagle under normal circumstances. The last group to finish was quite young, average age 13.5 just like the group in Bernard Gui's ward, and as a result things were really tight at the end there. Three did their Boards of Review in mid-December with *just* enough time to send their completed projects to BSA. Our ward has a few stragglers who were close but didn't quite make it due to their age. Both come from families that have always been heavily into scouting. They plan to join another scout troop for a year or two to finish things up. A close friend of many of the boys belongs to a troop sponsored by the kids' school, and the boys plan to switch over to that one (they may have done this already).
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