Jump to content

Mormons, The Internet, And The Arts


langbert

The Church and the Role of Arts  

6 members have voted

  1. 1. To what extent have you thought about arts and the Church?

    • Everyone knows there's a long history of prophetic vision regarding the Church and arts.
      4
    • This is a vaguely familiar concept, but I've never taken the time to research it.
      2
    • Artists are fairly grandiose, and tend to take things out of context, but there's still a shadow of truth to the notion of "publishing" the word (i.e., art).
      0
    • Arts are nice, but at the end of the day it's just missionaries (and the Church) that will spread the gospel.
      0


Recommended Posts

I recently listened to this Mormon Matter podcast on the changes that are taking place with missionaries taking to the web. It was a very interesting Podcast, but (it seems to me) there's a huge component in all this that most people are missing.

 

Often, when people speak of the Internet, they call it a new medium of democratization. There's a communal power inherent in the medium that goes beyond other kinds of mediums (book, film, music) because of the power of identity and connectivity. Futurists, savants, scholars, etc., have written and talked about this aspect of the web, and the power therein. (I've written about it too in a few places, including here.) Prophets have also written about it, prophetically. Here are just a few examples:

This is just a sampling. I've always been particularly intrigued with what President Kimball had to say, and I think this is an oft overlooked article—essentially, he's detailing how technology will facilitate the prophecy that the gospel will go to all the world.

 

However, all this said, I think there's a major component to all this that is often overlooked by the members of the Church.

 

Art.

 

Specifically, art as a crucial component of establishing Zion and building up the Kingdom.

 

Without really going into it in great depth, I'd rather just use this as a kicking off point. Have you personally considered how art may play a role in conversion? (There's also a question of identity, culture, and survival as an institution, which I'm not even touching on.) To what extent have you thought about this idea? I'm interested in finding like-minded individuals, as well as understanding the points of view of naysayers.

 

Discuss. :)

Link to post

As a musical service missionary, I must say the Church has long enjoyed the influence the MoTab brings wherever it goes. The leadership knows it. At temple square, few people enjoy the influence that Choir President Ron Jarrett has.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
  • 1 month later...

I've just been called as a Technical and Computer Missionary. In trying to understand what their goals are, the Bishop and the Missionary President just said, "Keep doing what you have been doing". This includes activity on FB and several other web sites. This is fairly astonishing since I am not an RM or life long Mormon. I know of two other sisters who have been called to the same thing.  Most of those I know are outside Mormon culture and includes some Muslims. I am using my real name in this Mission.

Edited by EllenMaksoud
Link to post

I've just been called as a Technical and Computer Missionary. In trying to understand what their goals are, the Bishop and the Missionary President just said, "Keep doing what you have been doing". This includes activity on FB and several other web sites. This is fairly astonishing since I am not an RM or life long Mormon. I know of two other sisters who have been called to the same thing.  Most of those I know are outside Mormon culture and includes some Muslims. I am using my real name in this Mission.

This gives me hope that I might be able to serve a mission with the Church History Library, even if I don't have a current temple recommend.  What do you think?  Of course I've yet to look into the kind of hours it would require.  I'd like to keep my day job as a school sub too.  Does your mission require a lot of hours?  I'd love to serve in the history of the church dept.  The JSP project was mentioned as something to help with on the church website.     

Link to post

This gives me hope that I might be able to serve a mission with the Church History Library, even if I don't have a current temple recommend.  What do you think?  Of course I've yet to look into the kind of hours it would require.  I'd like to keep my day job as a school sub too.  Does your mission require a lot of hours?  I'd love to serve in the history of the church dept.  The JSP project was mentioned as something to help with on the church website.     

Mine is not an "endowed" Mission, and working with several other endowed Missionaries, at the Bishop's warehouse, this endowment thing seems to be very important to them. Mine is a Ward level mission, and other than "just keep doing what you do" I've had no further instruction. From the Stake level down everyone has been extremely supportive, and constantly engage in the peculiar Mormon custom of member reinforcement. It does have the effect of being entirely encouraging.

 

I think this is part of the new thrust as alluded to at the last conference of increased Mormon presence on the internet. If you think about it, you don't need anyone's "permission" to share what is on your heart. If you know that Heavenly Father exists, and that Jesus Christ is your advocate before Heavenly Father, and that you are to love Heavenly Father and to love one another, then you have the right of it. There just has not been any doubt about Joseph Smith and the BOM, because of my past experiences in Islam. And what could be the most important part of being a Missionary is your testimony of what Heavenly Father has done in your life full stop. So, if you have the previous in your life, you do not need permission to be a Missionary, you just are, and it makes little difference to Heavenly Father if others are not on board yet.

Edited by EllenMaksoud
Link to post

Let us know how the Muslims react when you teach them

about exaltation.

 

Gail

My experience with Islam is limited, not having been outside the United States as Muslim. There are Muslim converts here in America. I am not the only one.

Link to post

Without really going into it in great depth, I'd rather just use this as a kicking off point. Have you personally considered how art may play a role in conversion? (There's also a question of identity, culture, and survival as an institution, which I'm not even touching on.) To what extent have you thought about this idea? I'm interested in finding like-minded individuals, as well as understanding the points of view of naysayers.

 

 

I had an intensely spiritual experience at an El Greco exhibitionin London nearly a decade ago.

Link to post

I'm not sure what to make of the questionnaire. I don't feel like any of them fully catches how I feel about it. 

 

I have plenty of personal experiences that tells me that the arts are at the least, an eternal gift and are often used as a means of building faith and a means of conversion. Music is fairly obvious as a pertinent means to build faith and bring the spirit. I have also seen this happen with other means...such as dance, videos, ets. Here's a cool video that I watched the other day about a man whose art helped to convert him:

 

http://www.lds.org/prophets-and-apostles/unto-all-the-world/infinitely-valued?lang=eng

 

For me, there's my patriarchal blessing and my art. Painting has been both a pleasure and a source of maintaining faith/hope, depending. Most of my paintings haven't been super spiritual. But a number have. One means everything to me. It's sacred to me/for me. Because of my visual/symbolic learning approach, the temple/scriptural symbols seem more accessible and deep....it gives me a different perspective that I enjoy. 

 

The arts are a pertinent means of expression that can be done in a way quite different to simple words. There's an expression that reaches to the quiet inflections of one's soul, that pulls out something deep within oneself and motivates greater contemplation. So of course it is a powerful tool for conversion.

 

With luv,

BD  

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Five Solas
      Thinking about BYU losing the US Air Force ROTC program it has hosted, almost since the inception of the Air Force (as a separate service from the USAAC).  Although some will play down the move to UVU – I think this could prove a watershed moment for BYU and for LDS.

      For over half a century the Air Force played by the rules of the LDS authored “Honor Code” at BYU and found officers willing to work within its constraints.  In return, BYU supplied thousands of competent officers. 

      And whatever the exact equation of costs vs. benefits for Air Force officer recruitment/training, one thing is certain: The LDS Church and its flagship university aren’t as valuable as they used to be.  They used to be worth accommodating--and now they're not.  LDS influence stands diminished. 

      A couple years ago, Daniel C. Peterson wrote an article that was perhaps prescient—

      Growing up in the fifties and sixties, it was easy to assume that American society respected Latter-day Saints. We might be out on the theological fringe, regarded as a bit quirky, but American civic religion was at least theoretically pretty much on our side. For example, Americans seemed to honor ideals of faithful, heterosexual marriage, with fathers taking the lead and mothers caring for children. Society was, in other words, largely in sync with, and supportive of, fundamental, practical Mormon values. In fact, Mormons seemed quintessentially American — which, in the postwar era of the Pax Americana, benefited our church not only in the United States but in Europe and Japan.

      Today, though, Mormonism and Western society seem to be parting ways in crucial respects.

      What do folks think?  Is the Air Force ROTC departure from BYU related to a broader trend Peterson wrote about in 2015?  
      --Erik

    • By Five Solas
      The point of this thread isn’t to discuss the particulars of the LDS temple and the practices therein.  And I’m not generally in favor of people being recorded without their knowledge.  But whether content is secret (e.g., government documents disclosed via “WikiLeaks”) or sacred (temple content, in the eyes of believing LDS)—the internet seems an irresistible magnet that sooner or later makes pretty much everything accessible on the broadest imaginable scale.
       
      I recently watched a video recorded inside an LDS temple on YouTube (I’ve watched a few things related to LDS, mostly debates between LDS and evangelical Christians & its all-knowing algorithm made a recommendation).  What struck me most were the theological implications of the content I was hearing.  Having never been “endowed” it quickly became evident to me that there’s a bit more to LDS doctrine than what gets discussed in church or on message boards.  There appears to be another layer to it I really don’t know much about.  But perhaps if I did understand it better--it would help me to better understand extended family members who carry a “temple recommend card.”
       
      So I’d like to ask some questions about it and have dialogue with those who adhere to such things.  Obviously I can’t do it here.  But the bigger question (and no doubt better discussion) is this: Thanks to the internet, lots more people are going to get familiar with temple content, including investigators and membership candidates.  They’ll have questions about what they’ve seen & heard.  There will need to be answers.  Simply condemning the posters (or the viewers) of such content will be inadequate.
       
      What should the response be?
       
      --Erik
       
    • By BCSpace
      Has bearing on LDS life and lifestyle:
       
       
       
      Sounds great.  I wonder what the company thinks of LDS franchisees? I searched on Chick-fil-A locations in Utah and there are a few. Didn't think there'd be many out that way. Obviously, that doesn't necessarily mean they are LDS. What are the laws on religious requirements for employment? Etc.
    • By BCSpace
      Currently front and center on the Church's youth site:
    • By Stone holm
      I believe at this point that America, once reputed to be the most religious nation on the planet has succumbed to a new religion called business which has as its sacred text market theory morphed from some of the writings of Adam Smith and a new deity known as the invisible hand. The question we have before us is how is the true Church going to deal with this new Whore of Babylon now that it has overcome atheistic Stalin style communism?
×
×
  • Create New...