Jump to content

At Home Celestial Room


Saints Alive

Recommended Posts

Has anyone heard of the trend of creating a celestial room in your own house?

I have heard of this trend and have seen several internet examples. These rooms range from a living room or study / library that the family uses for family home evenings, to special rooms set aside for reverent use with white carpets and walls and even alters.

This is alluded to by Joseph F Smith in the Journal of Discourses,

"…it is absolutely necessary that the Latter-day Saints should come together in the family capacity, and kneeling around the family altar, call upon God for his blessings morning and evening. And they need not confine themselves to morning and evening prayer, for it is their privilege to enter into their closets and call upon Him in secret, that He might reward them openly." (JD 22:47-48)

Here is a link to a resort that has its own "celestial room"

http://hideawayvalle...fe9be970b-800wi

http://hideawayvalley.typepad.com/

While I like the Idea of a room set aside for prayer and study, I could see myself creating such a room if I had the space, I am not sure recreating a celestial room or including an alter would show the proper respect to the House of the lord.

Edited by Saints Alive
Link to comment

"…it is absolutely necessary that the Latter-day Saints should come together in the family capacity, and kneeling around the family altar, call upon God for his blessings morning and evening. And they need not confine themselves to morning and evening prayer, for it is their privilege to enter into their closets and call upon Him in secret, that He might reward them openly." (JD 22:47-48) ...

The whole "altar" thing is a metaphor. C'mon, people, say it with me now! M-m-m-metaphor! ;):D

P.S.: Only heathens quote the JoD! ;):D

Link to comment

The whole "altar" thing is a metaphor. C'mon, people, say it with me now! M-m-m-metaphor! ;):D

P.S.: Only heathens quote the JoD! ;):D

then why does BY give dimensions for building one? what is that a metaphore for? There is actually some significant evidence that in by gone times alters in the home were common.

Edited by Saints Alive
Link to comment

then why does BY give dimensions for building one? what is that a metaphore for? There is actually some significant evidence that in by gone times alters in the home were common.

Bygone is the operative word there. Perhaps actual physical altars were more common in a bygone era because it was more practical to build them. I think today they would be an splendid excuse for the Pious Ducks among us to say to visiting neighbors and acquaintances, "Look at how devout I am! I have an altar in my home! I know that a special degree of the Celestial Kingdom is reserved for me and for those who follow my lead in building them." I don't need an altar to pray, nor do I need one to offer the one remaining sacrifice which is acceptable to the Lord, that of a broken heart and a contrite spirit. Just my 1.976351892 cents' worth. :)

P.S.: And I notice that you gloss over my partly tongue-in-cheek critique of your use of the JoD as a source. I like Brother Brigham; he didn't mince words, and he was the perfect one to lead the Church in his (and its) time. But unless and until President Thomas S. Monson says I should follow his altar-building, altar-using counsel, I don't feel bound by what the contributors to the JoD report that he said. :)

Edited by Kenngo1969
Link to comment

P.S.: And I notice that you gloss over my partly tongue-in-cheek critique of your use of the JoD as a source. I like Brother Brigham; he didn't mince words, and he was the perfect one to lead the Church in his (and its) time. But unless and until President Thomas S. Monson says I should follow his altar-building, altar-using counsel, I don't feel bound by what the contributors to the JoD report that he said. :)

Just to clarify, I don't advocate building home alters or celestial rooms. If one choose to build one I think there is a historical precedent that says it is probably ok depending on the motive behind building and using them. It would not be ok to build a celestial room / family alter for the sake of boasting or thinking that it gives you a special link to God.

There are people who build these rooms and it is probably something that a person should keep private if they decided to build one. I find the concept and the history behind extra temple alters and prayer circles fascinating.

Link to comment

Your links depict, at best, a faint copy of any Celestial room I've ever been in. The Prophets, Seers, and Revelators in our day have taught that our homes should be on par with the Temple in sacredness. I don't think this is what they have in mind, but it's not up to me to dictate to others how the Brethren's counsel applies to them. Personally, I think the prospect that any Tom, ****, and Harry (Ahem, I mean ... Brother Tom, Brother ****, and Brother Harry ;)) would attempt to "copy" the Celestial room diminishes the sacredness of those in duly authorized, dedicated edifices. Just my 2.012383038 cents' worth.

P.S.: I forgot that the Board's software has a bias against guys named Richard! (Not to mention such fine works of literature as Moby Richard! :rofl:

Edited by Kenngo1969
Link to comment

then why does BY give dimensions for building one? what is that a metaphore for? There is actually some significant evidence that in by gone times alters in the home were common.

Remember at that time the true order of prayer was practiced outside of the temple. I suspect this is related to that.

I have known families who have decorated part of their home in pastels and it certainly had the decor of a temple Celestial Room. That is about as far as I would ever go with it if it were me. I appreciated it, but I am not a pastel kind of guy nor is my wife.

Link to comment

Remember at that time the true order of prayer was practiced outside of the temple. I suspect this is related to that.

That is what I thought at first but extra temple prayer circles were not ended until 1978 yet it seems that relatively few had home altars.

I also find it curious that many consider our altars "weird" or "kooky" (or at least having one at home) but in the larger Christian community prayer altars / desks are not that uncommon. Granted the average Christian doesn't have one but it isn't unheard of either. Try to google "prayer Alter" or "prayer desk" and see what comes up. I found an Amish builder that does some fine work.

Edited by Saints Alive
Link to comment

That is what I thought at first but extra temple prayer circles were not ended until 1978 yet it seems that relatively few had home altars.

I also find it curious that many consider our altars "weird" or "kooky" (or at least having one at home) but in the larger Christian community prayer altars / desks are not that uncommon. Granted the average Christian doesn't have one but it isn't unheard of either. Try to google "prayer Alter" or "prayer desk" and see what comes up. I found an Amish builder that does some fine work.

I have nothing against anyone having an alter in their home. If I were to ever have one it would not be where any one could see it. I don't like the concept of imitating too closely the temple; it seems a little blasphemous, but I can be rigid at times. At the same time, I do feel that our homes are sacred and should be a refuge from the world. It could easily be a contradiction in my thinking and it would not be the first one found.

Link to comment

Remember at that time the true order of prayer was practiced outside of the temple. I suspect this is related to that.

I have known families who have decorated part of their home in pastels and it certainly had the decor of a temple Celestial Room. That is about as far as I would ever go with it if it were me. I appreciated it, but I am not a pastel kind of guy nor is my wife.

I'm glad to know that your wife isn't A Pastel Kind of "Guy"! :rofl:

Link to comment

With 7 children still at home I'd settle for a room clean and quiet enough to be considered Telestial.

You probably wouldn't want to put up a chandelier, either; it would intefere with any potential indoor football-playing exploits: "Hey, Ken! Go long!" :rofl:

Link to comment

Found this link to the Encylcopedia of Mormonism. Thought it was interesting.

http://eom.byu.edu/index.php/Prayer_Circle

Link to comment

Remember at that time the true order of prayer was practiced outside of the temple. I suspect this is related to that.

I have known families who have decorated part of their home in pastels and it certainly had the decor of a temple Celestial Room. That is about as far as I would ever go with it if it were me. I appreciated it, but I am not a pastel kind of guy nor is my wife.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT3_blbGdd0

Link to comment

Your links depict, at best, a faint copy of any Celestial room I've ever been in. The Prophets, Seers, and Revelators in our day have taught that our homes should be on par with the Temple in sacredness. I don't think this is what they have in mind, but it's not up to me to dictate to others how the Brethren's counsel applies to them. Personally, I think the prospect that any Tom, ****, and Harry (Ahem, I mean ... Brother Tom, Brother ****, and Brother Harry ;)) would attempt to "copy" the Celestial room diminishes the sacredness of those in duly authorized, dedicated edifices. Just my 2.012383038 cents' worth.

While my interior designing wife might disagree, it should be noted that the celestial-ness of a Celestial Room isn't based on the quality of the decor.

Link to comment

While my interior designing wife might disagree, it should be noted that the celestial-ness of a Celestial Room isn't based on the quality of the decor.

Fair enough. That's actually a pretty insightful observation. :) And, while some here might ridicule anything which is not empirically quantifiable, my comment, I think, goes beyond the mere aesthetic appearance of the room. Yes, on the one hand, we should strive, insofar as possible, to have the same spirit in our homes as is in the temple, but I think even the best of us falls short. On the other hand, if precisely the same spirit were in our homes as is in the temple, one of the very raisons d'etre of temples would be obviated.

Edited by Kenngo1969
Link to comment

Has anyone heard of the trend of creating a celestial room in your own house?

I have heard of this trend and have seen several internet examples. These rooms range from a living room or study / library that the family uses for family home evenings, to special rooms set aside for reverent use with white carpets and walls and even alters.

This is alluded to by Joseph F Smith in the Journal of Discourses,

"…it is absolutely necessary that the Latter-day Saints should come together in the family capacity, and kneeling around the family altar, call upon God for his blessings morning and evening. And they need not confine themselves to morning and evening prayer, for it is their privilege to enter into their closets and call upon Him in secret, that He might reward them openly." (JD 22:47-48)

Here is a link to a resort that has its own "celestial room"

http://hideawayvalle...fe9be970b-800wi

http://hideawayvalley.typepad.com/

While I like the Idea of a room set aside for prayer and study, I could see myself creating such a room if I had the space, I am not sure recreating a celestial room or including an alter would show the proper respect to the House of the lord.

In the Bible dictionary has this comment;; “Only the home can compare with the sacredness of the Temple”.

Edited by Bill “Papa” Lee
Link to comment

I have nothing against anyone having an alter in their home. If I were to ever have one it would not be where any one could see it. I don't like the concept of imitating too closely the temple; it seems a little blasphemous, but I can be rigid at times. At the same time, I do feel that our homes are sacred and should be a refuge from the world.

Nor I, Storm Rider... however, I too look upon my little cottage-by-the-sea as my refuge from the world. When I first moved in, I had my home blessed. Through the years I've been very careful who I invite into my home. Recently, I did a renovation project on my kitchen/den and there were numerous workmen and subcontractors in and out as the work progressed. Upon completion, and everything was back in place, I again called one of my ward brothers to come out and once again bless my home. And I look upon my little home as my "other holy place" in which I stand...

from the beach... GG

Link to comment
  • 2 weeks later...

The entrance to our home was set up as a Celestial room. All white carpet, furnature, everything else glass! Although the real one didn't have a fireplace it was a nice touch! It was a constant reminder to go the the real one!

Edited by One Clear Voice
Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...