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Christian Suspended By Employer Due To Religious Beliefs


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"Wheaton College faculty and staff make a commitment to accept and model our institution's faith foundations with integrity, compassion and theological clarity," the college said in a statement. "As they participate in various causes, it is essential that faculty and staff engage in and speak about public issues in ways that faithfully represent the college's evangelical Statement of Faith."

It's a Christian college suspending a Christian professor.  Is there a point you wanted to make?

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6 hours ago, Walden said:

One in 2009, one in 2014 and the middle one is fake - to make a point.  Yep,  there's a war on unbelievers alright. 

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15 hours ago, sheilauk said:

One in 2009, one in 2014 and the middle one is fake - to make a point.  Yep,  there's a war on unbelievers alright. 

If you can honestly come on here and state that Christians are more persecuted than atheists, then we will just have to disagree. Yes, persecution of the religious exists across all religions and among secular societies, but nowhere near the same level as persecution of non-believers. 

Per this article "http://www.thedp.com/article/2014/04/are-atheists-persecuted

“Mistrusted”: A 2011 study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology showed that subjects were more likely to distrust an atheist than they were to trust a rapist. The researchers cited several related studies that reached similar conclusions.

“Marginalized”: Roughly 15 percent of Americans self identify as having “no religious affiliation.” While not all are explicitly atheists, this collective demographic outnumbers the LGBT, Jewish and black minorities. Yet when we look at the U.S. Congress, not a single member is an admitted non-believer. Compare this to eight LGBT, 33 Jewish and 44 black members at last count. Atheists are severely underrepresented in politics. According to a 2012 Gallup poll, 43 percent of Americans would not vote for an otherwise qualified presidential candidate if they happened to be an atheist.

“Misunderstood”: Atheists frequently have to face claims that our lives must be so empty without God, questions about where we get our morals from and other rather confusing misconceptions about being nihilistic Satan worshipers who hate the god we don’t believe exists.

“Disadvantaged”: A close cousin to discrimination, misconceptions and stereotypes against atheists lead to child custody hearings where an atheist parent has a much harder time securing visitation rights than their religious former spouse. The judges in these cases are often quite explicit in their reasoning that the atheism of one parent was a determining factor in the decision.

“Demonized”: In this instance, being demonized often takes a more literal meaning. An email response I received for an earlier column thought “The Devil’s Advocate” was an appropriate moniker since I was in fact a “servant of the devil.” In 2012, atheist student Jessica Ahlquist was called an “evil little thing” by her state representative in Rhode Island for her stance against a school prayer in her public high school. Atheists are constantly being blamed by evangelical leadership for everything from the “moral decline” of society to natural disasters.

“Discriminated against”: It was only in 1961 that the Supreme Court guaranteed atheists the right to hold public office, serve on juries and testify in court, contrary to the constitutions of several states, including Pennsylvania. Many atheists are afraid to come out for a justifiable fear that they would lose their jobs. By some reports, less than 0.2 percent of U.S. prisoners report being an atheist, but it’s quite possible that’s because admitting to unbelief has been documented to derail parole hearings. While the Boy Scouts were being praised for their decision to allow openly gay scouts, many forgot that atheists are still banned outright from the organization.

 

http://www.economist.com/blogs/erasmus/2014/12/atheism-belief-and-persecution

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/26/atheist-discrimination-humanist-association_n_5531296.html

http://www.christiantoday.com/article/hacked.to.death.for.unbelief.the.rise.of.atheist.persecution/49836.htm

http://www.newsweek.com/atheists-face-persecution-worldwide-report-says-290649

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10 hours ago, Walden said:

...While the Boy Scouts were being praised for their decision to allow openly gay scouts, many forgot that atheists are still banned outright from the organization.

Far be it from me to deny that atheists have had to suffer discrimination for their beliefs, er, lack of belief, whatever.  You've got to go some to overcome the fact that Christians were once tossed to the lions or burned alive as illumination in the Roman Colosseum, and the Soviets made a point to send hundreds of thousands of priests and nuns into the Gulags, along with other kinds of believers.

As for the Boy Scouts, it's kind of hard to admit atheists when so much of Scouting's foundational premises involve theism to a great degree:

The Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best 
To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; 
To help other people at all times; 
To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.

The Scout Law

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy,
  • Loyal,
  • Helpful,
  • Friendly,
  • Courteous,
  • Kind,
  • Obedient,
  • Cheerful,
  • Thrifty,
  • Brave,
  • Clean,
  • and Reverent.

I will admit that Reverent could be kind of squishy, since an atheist could at least be held to be reverent by way of being respectful of others' beliefs, even if he doesn't share them.  

But it would be a rather large leap for Scouting to abandon its roots, which includes faith in God.  I'm sure you won't agree. :D

 

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10 hours ago, Stargazer said:

Far be it from me to deny that atheists have had to suffer discrimination for their beliefs, er, lack of belief, whatever.  You've got to go some to overcome the fact that Christians were once tossed to the lions or burned alive as illumination in the Roman Colosseum, and the Soviets made a point to send hundreds of thousands of priests and nuns into the Gulags, along with other kinds of believers.

As for the Boy Scouts, it's kind of hard to admit atheists when so much of Scouting's foundational premises involve theism to a great degree:

The Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best 
To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; 
To help other people at all times; 
To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.

The Scout Law

A Scout is:

  • Trustworthy,
  • Loyal,
  • Helpful,
  • Friendly,
  • Courteous,
  • Kind,
  • Obedient,
  • Cheerful,
  • Thrifty,
  • Brave,
  • Clean,
  • and Reverent.

I will admit that Reverent could be kind of squishy, since an atheist could at least be held to be reverent by way of being respectful of others' beliefs, even if he doesn't share them.  

But it would be a rather large leap for Scouting to abandon its roots, which includes faith in God.  I'm sure you won't agree. :D

 

We can go round and round citing examples of persecution on both sides, though your examples of persecution do conveniently leave out the great atrocities and persecution administered by Christians, such as the Crusades, the Inquisition, etc., etc. Ironically, most cases of religious persecution occur between the religious, whether it be Muslim persecution of Christians, Christian persecution of Jews, etc. 

I don't see anything in the Scout Law that would bar an atheist from living the law, though the "duty to God" bit in the Scout Oath is certainly a stumbling block. Unless the BSA is receiving federal funding, IMO it is free to determine it's requirements for membership, including belief in God. 

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14 hours ago, Walden said:

We can go round and round citing examples of persecution on both sides, though your examples of persecution do conveniently leave out the great atrocities and persecution administered by Christians, such as the Crusades, the Inquisition, etc., etc. Ironically, most cases of religious persecution occur between the religious, whether it be Muslim persecution of Christians, Christian persecution of Jews, etc. 

I don't see anything in the Scout Law that would bar an atheist from living the law, though the "duty to God" bit in the Scout Oath is certainly a stumbling block. Unless the BSA is receiving federal funding, IMO it is free to determine it's requirements for membership, including belief in God. 

I wasn't doing anything by convenience, I was just not being complete.  Thanks for rounding things out for me!

Personally, I don't see why the BSA couldn't adjust itself to permit atheists to openly participate in Scouting.  I think they will, eventually.

I know plenty of really nice and principled atheists.  My sister-in-law is one of the best of the breed, in fact.

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In my state, the law barring atheists from holding public office is enshrined in the state constitution.  

Some will be happy to know that the department I work in at a state university still has Christian prayers at meetings, Christian quotes on our department t shirts, and regular Christian pamphlets in our faculty mailboxes. 

cacheman

 

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On 12/25/2015 at 4:48 AM, cacheman said:

In my state, the law barring atheists from holding public office is enshrined in the state constitution.  

Some will be happy to know that the department I work in at a state university still has Christian prayers at meetings, Christian quotes on our department t shirts, and regular Christian pamphlets in our faculty mailboxes. 

cacheman

 

It's a "Dead Letter"  law. IOW Unenforceable, and unconstitutional.

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