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Aspergers Temple Grandin


Anijen

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I just watched an amazing movie the Temple Grandin movie (Clair Danes). An amazing accurate portrait of autism. As a father of a 23 year old son (a junior at Wayne State College). I wanted to say I saw in this movie so much of my son as he was growing. Wrestling with the many similar issues such as very picky food appetite to a strong reluctance of physical contact and many others. My wonderful wife and I had to teach our son many of the social skills that are naturally learned eg. such as eye contact when speaking, personal hygiene to things as taking things literally (the saying "hit the road", they envision hitting the road). We are so very proud of him and his achievements. He has gone through quite a bit in school (bullying and teasing), he has many strengths such as his phenomenal memory ( he loves words and is majoring in English Literature). I can pick up a book especially the ones he likes such as any Harry Potter or LoftR or currently the Hunger Series books and open up a page and he can quote them verbatim the same with the movies.

Anyway I would encourage all to see this wonderful movie about the Autistic life of Temple Grandin (voted in Time in 100 of the most influential people in the US). It is probably rated G I cant remember any swear word or anything that might make it less perhaps some animal violence (very little). I encourage this for a few reasons, first of all to better understand those with autism and perhaps we can teach our children not to tease. One of the most remarkable lines in the movie was "you are different, not less" If any of you have seen it tell me what you think. If you haven't do the netflix or see if Hulu has it and watch it for an FHE or something. It is an uplifting show. Thanks

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I just watched an amazing movie the Temple Grandin movie (Clair Danes). An amazing accurate portrait of autism. As a father of a 23 year old son (a junior at Wayne State College). I wanted to say I saw in this movie so much of my son as he was growing. Wrestling with the many similar issues such as very picky food appetite to a strong reluctance of physical contact and many others. My wonderful wife and I had to teach our son many of the social skills that are naturally learned eg. such as eye contact when speaking, personal hygiene to things as taking things literally (the saying "hit the road", they envision hitting the road). We are so very proud of him and his achievements. He has gone through quite a bit in school (bullying and teasing), he has many strengths such as his phenomenal memory ( he loves words and is majoring in English Literature). I can pick up a book especially the ones he likes such as any Harry Potter or LoftR or currently the Hunger Series books and open up a page and he can quote them verbatim the same with the movies.

Anyway I would encourage all to see this wonderful movie about the Autistic life of Temple Grandin (voted in Time in 100 of the most influential people in the US). It is probably rated G I cant remember any swear word or anything that might make it less perhaps some animal violence (very little). I encourage this for a few reasons, first of all to better understand those with autism and perhaps we can teach our children not to tease. One of the most remarkable lines in the movie was "you are different, not less" If any of you have seen it tell me what you think. If you haven't do the netflix or see if Hulu has it and watch it for an FHE or something. It is an uplifting show. Thanks

Sounds worth watching. There is one person on this board who has been diagnosed with it and another who has the traits for a mild case, but hasn't been tested.

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I just watched an amazing movie the Temple Grandin movie (Clair Danes). An amazing accurate portrait of autism. As a father of a 23 year old son (a junior at Wayne State College). I wanted to say I saw in this movie so much of my son as he was growing. Wrestling with the many similar issues such as very picky food appetite to a strong reluctance of physical contact and many others. My wonderful wife and I had to teach our son many of the social skills that are naturally learned eg. such as eye contact when speaking, personal hygiene to things as taking things literally (the saying "hit the road", they envision hitting the road). We are so very proud of him and his achievements. He has gone through quite a bit in school (bullying and teasing), he has many strengths such as his phenomenal memory ( he loves words and is majoring in English Literature). I can pick up a book especially the ones he likes such as any Harry Potter or LoftR or currently the Hunger Series books and open up a page and he can quote them verbatim the same with the movies.

Anyway I would encourage all to see this wonderful movie about the Autistic life of Temple Grandin (voted in Time in 100 of the most influential people in the US). It is probably rated G I cant remember any swear word or anything that might make it less perhaps some animal violence (very little). I encourage this for a few reasons, first of all to better understand those with autism and perhaps we can teach our children not to tease. One of the most remarkable lines in the movie was "you are different, not less" If any of you have seen it tell me what you think. If you haven't do the netflix or see if Hulu has it and watch it for an FHE or something. It is an uplifting show. Thanks

Thanks for sharing and for the suggestion! I will definitely check it out!

I have worked with a few patients with autism and aspergers and they have been my absolute favorites, until we have to do the blood work. pardon.gif

There is a guy (James Durbin) on American Idol (my fiance makes me watch it , I promise :) ) that has aspergers with tourettes. Amazingly talented individual and a great awareness for the nation.

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Sounds worth watching. There is one person on this board who has been diagnosed with it and another who has the traits for a mild case, but hasn't been tested.

OK, just took some internet tests to see what I could find out. I realize they don't count as a diagnosis, but I am more convinced than ever that I need to get tested. That explains why so much of what I write here gets such a weak response.

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My daughter had the opportunity to have a boy in all of her classes in elementary school who was autistic, he had the same aide throughout the 6 years which added to the experience as the kids became very comfortable around her and so were that much more likely to work to help him integrate in. Growing up with him meant that he wasn't seen as an 'outsider', just someone who had different qualities. About a third of the class each year were from immigrant families so they also had the opportunity to take new students under their wing and help them learn to read, to understand the culture etc. My daughter's best friend was from Korea during those years and even now she listens to a lot of Korean music, watches Korean videos, etc. It is remarkable how a little exposure in one's youth makes different cultures and different behaviours so much more accessible when one is an adult (this is mostly good, but can have some bad effects if that early exposure is to negative things unfortunately).

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I just watched an amazing movie the Temple Grandin movie (Clair Danes). An amazing accurate portrait of autism. As a father of a 23 year old son (a junior at Wayne State College). I wanted to say I saw in this movie so much of my son as he was growing. Wrestling with the many similar issues such as very picky food appetite to a strong reluctance of physical contact and many others. My wonderful wife and I had to teach our son many of the social skills that are naturally learned eg. such as eye contact when speaking, personal hygiene to things as taking things literally (the saying "hit the road", they envision hitting the road). We are so very proud of him and his achievements. He has gone through quite a bit in school (bullying and teasing), he has many strengths such as his phenomenal memory ( he loves words and is majoring in English Literature). I can pick up a book especially the ones he likes such as any Harry Potter or LoftR or currently the Hunger Series books and open up a page and he can quote them verbatim the same with the movies.

Anyway I would encourage all to see this wonderful movie about the Autistic life of Temple Grandin (voted in Time in 100 of the most influential people in the US). It is probably rated G I cant remember any swear word or anything that might make it less perhaps some animal violence (very little). I encourage this for a few reasons, first of all to better understand those with autism and perhaps we can teach our children not to tease. One of the most remarkable lines in the movie was "you are different, not less" If any of you have seen it tell me what you think. If you haven't do the netflix or see if Hulu has it and watch it for an FHE or something. It is an uplifting show. Thanks

Watched it and loved it. She had an amazing Mother.

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first of all to better understand those with autism and perhaps we can teach our children not to tease. One of the most remarkable lines in the movie was "you are different, not less"

I'm so sorry, Anijen, that your son had to endure such cruelty from other children... but so pleased to know that he was able to overcome and is doing so well. Speaks volumes about not only his inner strength, but of the love and care you and your wife were able to give him.

I agree that with bullying so much in the news today, and the effects of such behavior including some tragic consequences, it is vital that parents start teaching their children at a young age to respect others, particularly those who are different or have challenges. Only then will the bullying problem be able to be addressed.

GG

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Yeah, the movie really did do a good job explaining us, and how we think and connect things together. =) I highly recommend it... it covers things pretty well from all angles, at least for me. But yah... it was a remarkable movie that I am probably going to get on DVD. At least I hope I am. =D

Edited by TAO
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OK, just took some internet tests to see what I could find out. I realize they don't count as a diagnosis, but I am more convinced than ever that I need to get tested. That explains why so much of what I write here gets such a weak response.

Nathair, your post does remind me of my son; if he tells a joke that isn't funny he wants to know why, or if he speaks of an important concept he is constantly looking back at you for a physical confirmation that you are agree or understanding even when it is difficult to read people faces and responses. I admire my son so very much. He is such an example for me to follow. I have never known him to tell a lie and he is the most virtuous person I know (he wont even discuss a kiss). He has remarkable faith and when my wife and I really want something to happen we ask him to pray for it because of his faith (his prayers seem to be always answered quickly). We hope this is not bad and we hardly ever ask him, sometimes feeling like we lack faith or that we are taking a shortcut to our Heavenly Father. Anyway he is remarkable and we love him so much. If you are diagnosed with Aspergers I will always have a special place in my heart for you and will read your posts with more interest from here on out. Take care.

Thank you all for your wonderful and thoughtful remarks.

Anijen

Some symptoms that Aspergers seem to have in common;

What might appear to be lack of sympathy (but in their minds it is more complex and hard to express).

Take remarks literally.

Avoids physical contact (such as hugging). My son has learned to hug (usually just family) but he is still uncomfortable with it.

Usually will excel in one or two things like math (my son has a near photographic memory with books he has read or with movies he has watched).

Very pick eater, Only likes to eat what they want to. For some reason crispy chicken seems to be a favorite of many with Aspergers.

Social skills are awkward and usually has to be taught to them.

Most need a friendly but constant reminder for personal hygiene (This was the case for Temple Grandin in the movie and also for my son).

Theses are just some that I have read about.

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OK, just took some internet tests to see what I could find out. I realize they don't count as a diagnosis, but I am more convinced than ever that I need to get tested. That explains why so much of what I write here gets such a weak response.

Lol, Nathair, we are always watching, always watching ;-). We just don't say things all of the time XD.

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Some symptoms that Aspergers seem to have in common;

My grandson has Aspergers, which isn't as noticeable now that he is older. He didn't have a problem so much with hugging, at least family members, but he had real issues with not being able to read people and know when enough it enough. I can remember when he was a little guy taking him out to eat in the mall and having to physically move his face and make eye contact to get his attention; I always had to remind him to eat because he would stare off into space and just sit there. But there was a driving game that he loved there and he could barely reach the pedals but he was so good he kept winning free games and we would have been there all night if I didn't tell him it's time to lose and he would purposely mess up.

When he was a toddler he had a lot of repetitive motions. He would go around a circle for hours with his little car until you made him stop. He had a really great elementary school where they recognized his social issues and he was getting picked on because he just didn't know how to behave with other kids his age (though he got along great with littler kids and adults. There were a couple of other little boys with issues and they had a special class to teach them social skills, including not getting into someone else's space, reading signals, etc. That was really helpful.

He's 14 now and still has some social issues, probably always will, but he is so smart and has really come a long way that it would probably be unnoticeable if you didn't know he has problems. Adults love him because he knows what is going on and they can have an adult conversation with him; he still has problems with peers, but gets along better with girls than boys, probably because they are more accepting (plus he's a good-looking boy). He has been a challenge and a delight at the same time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My wife and I really liked that movie as well. I second the recommendation.

Another excellent movie from HBO is "Taking Chance". It's the true story of a Marine Lt. Col. (played by Kevin Bacon) who accompanies the body of a fallen soldier on its journey back to his hometown. It is a simple story but told very well, and it will help foster deep feelings of patriotism and appreciation for the sacrifices made by the men and women of our military.

It is an especially good film to watch with the family as Memorial Day approaches. There's a few bad words(maybe even just one?) in one scene but otherwise it's extremely family friendly; probably enough to be considered a light PG rating.

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