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Emergency Preparedness Resources


halconero

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Hey ya'llz. Currently I'm self-isolating at home due to some recent international travel, the fact that my fiancée and her family all have factors that put them in higher-risk groups, and that I'm currently hosting my recently returned parents from Asia. A bit of background - I grew up rural, have a refugee parent, who also served in armed forces. So I grew up with a lot a semi-prepper mentality.

Thankfully, I have the type of job where I can work from home for a good chunk of time, and during one of my breaks, I decided to put together a preparedness checklist, divided into the following categories:

- General Guidelines

- Beginner Stuff

- Intermediate

- Advanced

- An addendum on firearms

GENERAL GUIDELINES

1. Emergency preparedness is an act of solidarity. It is community building. Your plan should not center around selfish-isolationism. The more prepared you are in an emergency, the more able you are to aid your friends, family and neighbours, all of whom will be among your closest allies. Something something lone wolf.

2. Having your finances, insurance, and estate planning in order is way more important than having a bug-out bag or buying an AR-15.

3. Take regular walks if physically possible. 20-30 minutes a day.

4. You can start studying emergency preparedness right now, pick up some skills, and do some financial planning, but do not invest in any supplies at the moment. Price gouging is rampant right now. Do not reward it. When things settle down, do not buy pre-organized emergency or food storage kits. They are usually over-priced, filled with garbage food, or more frequently, meet both of these criteria.

5. Review this checklist, but do not get overwhelmed by it. Preparedness comes in stages.

BEGINNER

1. Review your finances. This flowchart may aid you in deciding how to allocate your wages (Canada version).

2. Rental insurance explainer (if you do not have home insurance)

4. Dried Beans Conversions and Measurements. Should be a staple along with rice in any long-term food storage.

INTERMEDIATE (also fun!)

1. Urban Foraging Guide

2. A Prepper’s Guide to Pickling

3. Freezing Vegetables

ADVANCED

1. Emergency Medicine Podcast

2. The Survival Doctor's Guide to Wounds (Book); Online version

3. Bushcraft 101

4. Street Medic Guide

5. Military Medical

ADDENDUM ON FIREARMS

I've gotten a lot of normally anti-gun friends contacting me about purchasing firearms. That's fine, but it should not be the basis for long-term preparedness. Having your finances in order and a decent supply of dried beans will increase your ability to survive and thrive in an emergency far more than having a firearm will, as most emergencies will involve natural disasters and pandemics (like now) than they will involve invasion or violent looters. Even then, as I'll point out below, the type of firearm most useful to you in an emergency is not the kind you may expect.

1. DO NOT BUY A FIREARM RIGHT NOW. There is pretty rampant price gouging going on, both for guns and ammo. Do not reward or buy into it. You are fine. Chill out, review the above links first, and then come back to this section in a couple months.

2. Lear the safety rules first. DO NOT go anywhere near a gun before you learn how to safely interact with one, whether or not you are holding it. Weirdly enough, one of the best manuals I've found on gun safety comes from the Socialist Rifle Association of America. You might even have a chapter near your house, maybe under the John Brown Gun Club label. Many of them offer to show people how to handle a firearm for free. I don't feel like getting into politics, but I'll state right now that these people are generally far more friendly than some typical gun clubs, and no, I'm not a socialist in the least.

3. The first gun you should buy is not an AR-15. Not a shotgun. Not a handgun. You will want to buy a .22 long rifle. Yes, the one with the small bullets. You can usually purchase a starter .22 at a pawn shop for roughly $100 USD, and rounds are about $40-60 for 1000 of them. This is a very handy gun to train on, and relatively cheap to do so. In a disaster situation, it will be far more useful to you than an AR-15 will, because it will allow you to hunt small game like birds and small mammals for some protein. If you are determined to get a firearm, and I'm not saying you should be, start here.

4. IF you decide you want to purchase something far more lethal, please be aware that lethality applies to you and your family as well. Plenty of gun-related deaths occur within families due to unsafe storage and handling of firearms, leading to both accidents and suicides. I'm not trying to warn you off. I'm trying to make sure you know just how dangerous this is. Please be aware of the trade-offs.

5. Stick to guns that utilize the NATO variety of ammunition. That is 9mm, 7.62x51mm/.308, .223 Rem./5.56. That, or a shotgun with shells. Don't get weird with unique firearms with odd ammunition types. There are billions of these rounds and shells in the United States alone.

6. Trigger warning: a note on suicide. If you experience suicidal ideation, frequent moments of depression or anxiety, or other mental health struggles, I strongly discourage you from owning a firearm right now. Please do not get one, and please focus on recovery in partnership with a trained mental health professional, family members, and church leaders (if appropriate). Okay, now having said that, some folks here might be determined to minimize or get one anyways. IF you do (and you should not!), then take the top-half of your firearm, called an upper-receiver, and give it to a trusted friend. The deal here on after is that you only get to train or use your firearm when you are together.

Okay, that last bit seems to have swamped the rest, but I would start with the emergency preparedness checklist. I feel like this pandemic may have awoken a lot of folks to the realities of preparedness. Good! Above all, I want to reiterate how preparedness is an act of community building, not isolation. I also want to state how following the counsel of the prophets on preparedness, and having a testimony of God, Christ, and the Restoration can help us not only feel peace in troubled times, but inspire in navigating it with confidence, while blessing the lives of those around us.

 

Edited by halconero
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33 minutes ago, halconero said:

Having your finances, insurance, and estate planning in order is way more important than having a bug-out bag or buying an AR-15.

This is my bogeyman at the moment.  Our own is decent, but my mom's stuff is currently filed in piles on my desk.  Next project on the list after I figure out what to do with the stuff I took out of the pantry so that the food we have there is easier to keep track of.  I stopped the helper coming midproject (she emptied the pantry for me her last day) and having to do it in bits and pieces while the daily clutter she helped me deal with is building up is a bit overwhelming (and very annoying, .I used to overhaul the entire house every spring in three days...now it's three years, lol).

Excellent thread idea, btw.

Edited by Calm
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For those who like a book reference on hand, the best book I have read on preparedness (not that I have read that many, so this is not substituting for halconero's experienced advice)...which made it part of your daily living (basically short term crisis food storage is buy extra of what you already eat during sales and rotate, crisis time is not the time to change your diet and this saves you money in long run big time) is Food Storage For the Clueless.  I can't remember if they get into nonfood stuff.  Looks like it is back in print and you can even get it as an ebook.  It was a fun read and made food storage very nonoverwhelming.

https://deseretbook.com/p/food-storage-clueless-clark-l-kidd-4317?variant_id=118695-ebook&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpfHzBRCiARIsAHHzyZrxn6Ib6D8Yn6c6I5YmSoi-JFf50rPA9FTU4cdfwmDgxeSV60njNIsaArwdEALw_wcB

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My husband and I still don't have a trust set up, so that is a good idea huh? 

About the suicide thing. I feel it necessary to be able to have something other than have something worse happen. Does that make sense? ( like a pill?) I know that sounds so bad. But I can think of worse things happening.

I appreciate you taking time to share the links etc. I guess I need to quit being so nonchalant about this. 

ETA: I'm not horrible, I do have the water down, and I have 4 -72 hour kit back backs, and the freeze dried food in containers I bought for each of my children two years ago. My husband wants to bring cash home instead of leaving it in the bank, kind of worries me though. We have a lot of what was listed so glad about that. I don't have many things in a spot that I remember in order to get to them fast, so organization is needed big time. 

Thanks again, this has sort of made me wake up, along with a recent earthquake in Utah, and the COVID-19 outbreak. :(

Edited by Tacenda
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I would put providentliving.org on your beginning part. There used to be more about money and other things self-reliant than I am seeing now.  Maybe because I'm on my phone?

I would also move the bean conversion to intermediate.  Beginning should be about getting a 3 month supply of things you normally eat.  Easy way to do this is buying 2 of what you need when you do your normal shopping when it goes on sale or when you are able to. (Your recipe calls for 1 can of tomatoes so you get 2. The next time you make that recipe you get 2 cans, use the one off your shelf and store the 2 you just got and so on.)

Then your intermediate would be your year supply of longer term storage items. Not that you shouldn't eat your wheat and dried beans etc, but many people don't, so the church now teaches 3 month supply first. 

Edited by Rain
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Has the Relief Society begun a massive project to make personal protective equimpment (PPE) for their local hospitals worldwide?  If so, why haven't we heard about it?  If not, why not?  I should think that the Relief Society and the Presiding Bishop could be very effective in doing that together.

ETA: I just sent this notion to the new Relief Society website.

Edited by Robert F. Smith
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5 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

Has the Relief Society begun a massive project to make personal protective equimpment (PPE) for their local hospitals worldwide?  If so, why haven't we heard about it?  If not, why not?  I should think that the Relief Society and the Presiding Bishop could be very effective in doing that together.

ETA: I just sent this notion to the new Relief Society website.

Robert, they're now saying the masks aren't going to be helpful, because they aren't up to the standards that are needed. At least that's what some hospitals around my hometown have put out in some emails I've received. I was all geared up to trying to sew some, but not now. My friend sewed some along with several groups putting out the message that they were needed and asking people to help sew them. My friend gave me one of hers, it seems like it would do a great job, but perhaps not in a hospital. I'll wear mine, if I need to. 

5 hours ago, Calm said:

What are you suggesting they make?

I bet he means masks, or maybe more than that. Some body clothing could help, as long as they were made out of the right material. Or even the face shields, I saw somewhere that people were making them 3D.

Edited by Tacenda
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8 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

Has the Relief Society begun a massive project to make personal protective equimpment (PPE) for their local hospitals worldwide?  If so, why haven't we heard about it?  If not, why not?  I should think that the Relief Society and the Presiding Bishop could be very effective in doing that together.

ETA: I just sent this notion to the new Relief Society website.

I know many, many people doing the mask covers.  Typically I wouldn't think the RS would do this right now since so many are doing this.

I do know that my mom said there was something on the news yesterday asking people to stop making them because they don't know what is best to use right now.  

  

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In the short term, or should I say, “for” the short term, our home is always filled with dry beans, grits, oatmeal’s, potatoes, etc. things such as this that requires only Water, Salt, and Cooking Oils, to create meals. We have bread machines with months of bread recipes, in the event bread is difficult to get. Also we target purchase certain things often, and items that maybe the General population is not thinking they need yet, as needed right away. We also pick up each time the stores are stocked, all dairy, meats, toiletries, eggs. Having a “plan” is important, but we implement our plan, as often as we can, in good or bad times. This way we are never caught unaware, or unprepared. So far we have done very well, and expect to do so for months to come. We can also assist our neighbors in and out of the Church, to a degree, and we look forward to helping. It can and will be a great missionary tool, that allows us to teach, and to help, and the Gospel Principles that Govern this activity within the Church. 

Edited by Bill “Papa” Lee
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On 3/27/2020 at 5:24 PM, Rain said:

I know many, many people doing the mask covers.  Typically I wouldn't think the RS would do this right now since so many are doing this.

I do know that my mom said there was something on the news yesterday asking people to stop making them because they don't know what is best to use right now.  

  

I saw a post today from a health clinic that is asking for the homemade ones to wear over their other mask allowing them to stay cleaner. Also, I think the general public could gain a lot by wearing them as well if they are advised to. 

Edited by Tacenda
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