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Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times

exhibit at

The Leonardo museum in Salt Lake City,

209 E 500 S,

Salt Lake City, UT 84111

(801) 531-9800.

 

The exhibit opened to the public Friday Nov 22, 2013 and will be open until April 2014.

General admission is $23.95. Discount prices are available for students, seniors, youth, and military. Since this is a popular exhibit, patrons are encouraged to buy tickets online and sign up for a specific entry time at  http://www.theleonardo.org/exhibits/discover/dead-sea-scrolls-life-and-faith-ancient-times/ , or  https://50474.blackbaudhosting.com/50474/page.aspx?pid=196&tab=2&txobjid=d498406a-98b2-4055-98cd-0425e96ad187 .

 

 

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Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times
exhibit at
The Leonardo museum in Salt Lake City,
209 E 500 S,
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
(801) 531-9800.
 
The exhibit opened to the public Friday Nov 22, 2013 and will be open until April 2014.
General admission is $23.95. Discount prices are available for students, seniors, youth, and military. Since this is a popular exhibit, patrons are encouraged to buy tickets online and sign up for a specific entry time at  http://www.theleonardo.org/exhibits/discover/dead-sea-scrolls-life-and-faith-ancient-times/ , or  https://50474.blackbaudhosting.com/50474/page.aspx?pid=196&tab=2&txobjid=d498406a-98b2-4055-98cd-0425e96ad187 .

 

Can't wait for this, woohoo!!!

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      I can't recall the reference but I seem to remember Hugh Nibley had the opinion that the third Jerusalem Temple would be built according to the blueprint in the Dead Sea Scrolls Temple Scroll vs the blueprint in Ezekiel.
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      So according to the followng KSL news article sometime this fall the Dead Sea Scrolls will be on display in SLC at the Leonardo. I must admit this is worth making the trip from Arizona to see. Does anyone know off of the top of there head about how long these shows are usually on display for? I know there is debate on the cost for tickets to view but I'm really not to worried about that...just the timing.
      http://www.ksl.com/?...&s_cid=queue-22
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