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What does it mean to you to be a Mormon?


Cairbre

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I don't understand the word "chappy".

So there are no differences between Mormons and Christians?

Really i dont think chappy has anything to do with it? {i dont even know what that word means}; but anyway to answer your question; there are not differances between us and other christians except there are other religeons that make the claim that we are not because we "know" certain things that have been restored to mankind after being lost or taken away in the past; {preistood} baptism for the dead and so on; and we "know" that God still talks to people in these days as he did in ancient. other than a few things like that we beleive in God, his son Jesus Christ; which by definition makes us christian. :P

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I don't understand the word "chappy".

So there are no differences between Mormons and Christians?

You'll probably find more and better answers at www.lds.org, but Christians is a category of belief- your question is like asking if there's a difference between Parisians and Frenchmen.

Yes, we have differences in doctrine than other Christian denominations, but we are still Christians.

Mormons and Anglicans are both Christians just as Shi'a (sorry about the spelling) and Sunni have different interpretations of doctrine, yet are both Muslim.

The largest difference is that most Christians believe that the last prophet/apostle died around 70 a.d. and the canon of scripture is closed.

Mormons believe that prophets of God still walk the Earth today, and that there is more Scripture than is found in the Bible alone.

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It's like asking what's the difference in Baptists and Christians.

So both Baptists and Mormons call yourselves Christians?

But can a Baptist call himself Mormon?

And do Mormons call themselves Baptists?

You are telling me that A = C and B = C but A does not equal B.

So if you leave me with nothing more, I would have to say that neither are Christian.

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Some Christians recognize the Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price as scripture, and act accordingly. That's the main difference between non Mormon Christians and memebers of the Church of Jesus Christ Latter-day Saints.

OK, now that is a difference. Christian/Mormons believe in additional scripture which the other denominations do not.

You call yourselves latter-day saints. Are other Christian saints?

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As originally used, yes- all Christians were "saints".

Over time, the meaning of the word changed, and "saint" was reserved for people who were notable and extraordinary examples of Christian faith.

We have revived the original meaning, though most Christians prefer the modern one.

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Really i dont think chappy has anything to do with it? {i dont even know what that word means}; but anyway to answer your question; there are not differances between us and other christians except there are other religeons that make the claim that we are not because we "know" certain things that have been restored to mankind after being lost or taken away in the past; {preistood} baptism for the dead and so on; and we "know" that God still talks to people in these days as he did in ancient. other than a few things like that we beleive in God, his son Jesus Christ; which by definition makes us christian. :P

If there are not differences between you (Mormons) and other Christians, then why should anyone join your church?

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I don't understand the word "chappy".

So there are no differences between Mormons and Christians?

"Chappy" is a British or possibly Australian colloquialism sort of like "buddy" or "pal". An informal, usually friendly way of refering to an acquaintance or distant friend.

And Joseph Antley is, in general, correct: Mormonism is a sect or denomination within the broad tradition of Christianity. Mormons (they prefer to be called 'Latter-Day Saints or LDS) see themselves as being every bit as much Christian as any member of any other branch of the Christian faith.

They do have distinctives, of course, and many of these are more dramatic than the differences between, say, Baptists and Lutherans, or between Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics. The LDS have an entire body of Scripture unique to their own movement. Moreover, if one uses some traditional standard of orthodox doctrine, such as the Apostles or Nicene creed, then Latter-Day Saints deviate in some highly signficant ways from standard Christianity. Generally, when critics call Mormonism a 'non-Christian' movement, they are measuring it by some such standard of strict orthodoxy.

It should be kept in mind, however, that the official name of Mormonism is "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints", and that Mormons see themselves as 'Christians' inasmuch as they honor Jesus Christ and try to conform their lives so as to be 'Christ-like'. In case you weren't aware--the early followers of Jesus were called Christians precisely because they tried to be like Christ--that is what the 'ian' suffix of the word 'Christian' means: 'like Christ'.

Hope this helps!

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You'll probably find more and better answers at www.lds.org, but Christians is a category of belief- your question is like asking if there's a difference between Parisians and Frenchmen.

Yes, we have differences in doctrine than other Christian denominations, but we are still Christians.

Mormons and Anglicans are both Christians just as Shi'a (sorry about the spelling) and Sunni have different interpretations of doctrine, yet are both Muslim.

The largest difference is that most Christians believe that the last prophet/apostle died around 70 a.d. and the canon of scripture is closed.

Mormons believe that prophets of God still walk the Earth today, and that there is more Scripture than is found in the Bible alone.

I wish to hear from Mormons, not research a religion on lds websites.

Funny you should mention Parisians as your example because most Parisians would proudly confess a difference between themselves and their countrymen.

Muslims are divided mostly along national lines. Different cultures, different practices.

Are Mormons just another denomination of Christianity?

What do Mormons believe about the prophet Mohammad? Did he speak for God?

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If there are not differences between you (Mormons) and other Christians, then why should anyone join your church?

There is within the Christian faith a disagreement the best way to become Christ-like, a disagreement on exactly what teachings and which practices are those established by Christ Himself for the salvation of souls.

Catholics and Eastern Orthox believe that Christ left a Church by which to discern His truth and guide His people.

Protestants, broadly speaking, believe that Christ left his teachings to be set in writing by His apostles for the edification of Christians.

Mormons believe that Christ left the gift of continuing revelation through an on-going succession of apostles and prophets; and that, when that lineage of apostles and prophets was lost through unbelief and persecution, Christ restored them through Joseph Smith and his successors.

A bit over-simplified but a good overview for you.

Again, hope it helps!

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As originally used, yes- all Christians were "saints".

Over time, the meaning of the word changed, and "saint" was reserved for people who were notable and extraordinary examples of Christian faith.

We have revived the original meaning, though most Christians prefer the modern one.

So most Christians do not consider themselves saints?

What makes a Mormon a saint?

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OK, now that is a difference. Christian/Mormons believe in additional scripture which the other denominations do not.

You call yourselves latter-day saints. Are other Christian saints?

saint (snt)

n.

1.

a. Abbr. St. or S. Christianity A person officially recognized, especially by canonization, as being entitled to public veneration and capable of interceding for people on earth.

b. A person who has died and gone to heaven.

c. Saint A member of any of various religious groups, especially a Latter-Day Saint.

2. An extremely virtuous person.

tr.v. saint

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So most Christians do not consider themselves saints?

What makes a Mormon a saint?

Correct. Most Christians prefer the modern meaning and would be reluctant to describe themselves as such (doing so would be considered pride ful or arrogant).

Mormons, on the other hand, prefer the older meaning.

An interesting cultural artifact though- I've never heard a Mormon refer to himself as a Saint. The term is used almost exclusively to describe Church as a whole.

A Mormon will refer to the Mormon membership as a whole as "the Saints", but only rarely refer to himself as one- probably for the same reason other Christians are reluctant to do so.

According to the original definition, anyone who dedicated his (or her) life to worshipping Christ and trying to become more like him was considered a Saint. That's basically the definition to which we hold.

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"Chappy" is a British or possibly Australian colloquialism sort of like "buddy" or "pal". An informal, usually friendly way of refering to an acquaintance or distant friend.

And Joseph Antley is, in general, correct: Mormonism is a sect or denomination within the broad tradition of Christianity. Mormons (they prefer to be called 'Latter-Day Saints or LDS) see themselves as being every bit as much Christian as any member of any other branch of the Christian faith.

They do have distinctives, of course, and many of these are more dramatic than the differences between, say, Baptists and Lutherans, or between Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics. The LDS have an entire body of Scripture unique to their own movement. Moreover, if one uses some traditional standard of orthodox doctrine, such as the Apostles or Nicene creed, then Latter-Day Saints deviate in some highly signficant ways from standard Christianity. Generally, when critics call Mormonism a 'non-Christian' movement, they are measuring it by some such standard of strict orthodoxy.

It should be kept in mind, however, that the official name of Mormonism is "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints", and that Mormons see themselves as 'Christians' inasmuch as they honor Jesus Christ and try to conform their lives so as to be 'Christ-like'. In case you weren't aware--the early followers of Jesus were called Christians precisely because they tried to be like Christ--that is what the 'ian' suffix of the word 'Christian' means: 'like Christ'.

Hope this helps!

Certainly, Chap.

Jesus lead a special life and brought much truth into the world. The Koran pays homage to him.

I can see why Mormons would see themselves as Christians and saints according to the early days of the gospel. But how do you reconcile the other Christian denominations with you? Do you consider them equal to you in Christ? Christians believe they are the body of Christ. Do Mormons accommodate that idea?

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To be a Mormon means that we are the fruits of a Restoration of the original Church of Jesus Christ, through the gift and power of God. To be Mormon means that we believe God the Father sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to suffer and die for us, that we might be saved if we would obey and partake of His atoning sacrifice. As Mormons, we have been given the Priesthood authority to speak, act, and officiate in the name of Jesus Christ for the salvation of God's children on earth, to do His will.

We are different from other Christians because we do not accept that the Godhead is some fused set of beings one in essence. We believe that they are distinct and individual beings, united in love for us, in work and in glory, to bring to pass the immortality and eternal life of man. We are similar in that we strongly believe that the only way man can be saved is through the Atonement and grace of the Savior. It is by Him, and through Him alone, that salvation comes by accepting His mercy and living according to the examples He set forth, and the commandments He gave.

Hope something of this helps.

Edited to add:

The other Christian denominations are a direct result of the tampering and fallibility of wicked men taking control of the early Church after the murder and death of the Apostles. With them, the authority to administer the Gospel was taken because the people rejected the things Jesus taught. Christ is no respecter of persons, in that He sees us all as we are: children of God desperately in need of His love and mercy. However, He does know where His authority is, that is with Thomas S. Monson and the other Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. We invite all who profess belief in Christ as the Son of God, that He atoned for our sins and was resurrected to call themselves Christian.

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There is within the Christian faith a disagreement the best way to become Christ-like, a disagreement on exactly what teachings and which practices are those established by Christ Himself for the salvation of souls.

Catholics and Eastern Orthox believe that Christ left a Church by which to discern His truth and guide His people.

Protestants, broadly speaking, believe that Christ left his teachings to be set in writing by His apostles for the edification of Christians.

Mormons believe that Christ left the gift of continuing revelation through an on-going succession of apostles and prophets; and that, when that lineage of apostles and prophets was lost through unbelief and persecution, Christ restored them through Joseph Smith and his successors.

A bit over-simplified but a good overview for you.

Again, hope it helps!

Yes, others have mentioned revelation as a distinguishing feature of your church. I understand that most other Christians do not believe in continuing revelation. That alone seems like a wide gulf between the LDS and other Christians.

Any other differences?

By the replies so far I believe I am hearing only from Mormons.

I suppose other Christians might have a different view.

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saint (snt)

n.

1.

a. Abbr. St. or S. Christianity A person officially recognized, especially by canonization, as being entitled to public veneration and capable of interceding for people on earth.

b. A person who has died and gone to heaven.

c. Saint A member of any of various religious groups, especially a Latter-Day Saint.

2. An extremely virtuous person.

tr.v. saint

Link to comment

Correct. Most Christians prefer the modern meaning and would be reluctant to describe themselves as such (doing so would be considered pride ful or arrogant).

Mormons, on the other hand, prefer the older meaning.

An interesting cultural artifact though- I've never heard a Mormon refer to himself as a Saint. The term is used almost exclusively to describe Church as a whole.

A Mormon will refer to the Mormon membership as a whole as "the Saints", but only rarely refer to himself as one- probably for the same reason other Christians are reluctant to do so.

According to the original definition, anyone who dedicated his (or her) life to worshipping Christ and trying to become more like him was considered a Saint. That's basically the definition to which we hold.

So according to you all Christians who worship Christ are saints. Is there no distinction made between how one worships?

Does God (or Christ) honor all forms of worship?

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