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Why Are Mormons Rising In Business, Politics?


Bill “Papa” Lee

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The article suggests that

Recent media reports say almost all Mormons who have excelled in business and public life have been trained at MTC.

I think it is based on the scripture that…

“The glory of God is intelligence”, that and a strong “work ethic”. We are push to excel and “magnify our callings”.

Would you agree?

Not all from the MTC excel in business…Don’t want to discuss politics, no rule violations please. I think Romney got his business training from his father, not the MTC.

Here is Artcle

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The article suggests that

I think it is based on the scripture that…

“The glory of God is intelligence”, that and a strong “work ethic”. We are push to excel and “magnify our callings”.

Would you agree?

Not all from the MTC excel in business…Don’t want to discuss politics, no rule violations please. I think Romney got his business training from his father, not the MTC.

Here is Artcle

I think it's a classic example of the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy (which too many Latter-day Saints and critics of Mormonism use to validate their claims).

In my experience, the most successful Latter-day Saints in business and politics achieved their success because they came from a socio-economic background that allowed them to develop good skills and flourish. Mitt Romney had been primed by his father literally from the moment he could walk. Huntsman came from similar circumstances.

Perhaps faith might play an important role, as Elder Kim B. Clark recently noted:

But the roots of Mormonism’s distinctiveness go beyond the church’s history and organizational structure. They go all the way down to some of the church’s unique theological doctrines. The Mormons believe, for example, in “eternal progression,” which means both that God himself was once a human being and that we can follow his example to evolve into gods ourselves. This progression toward ever-higher stages of divine perfection extends beyond death, continuing into the afterlife.

For Kim Clark, a Mormon and former dean of the Harvard Business School, this doctrine explains a lot about the church’s drive toward economic and educational achievement. “Your whole eternal identity as a person is defined by eternal progression,” says Clark. “We know that…there will be opportunities to grow and learn and become like our heavenly father, to do what he does. That’s a very powerful thing.”

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I think the structure and culture of (at least) American Mormonism leans toward business-oriented fields. Comes with the conservative Americanism that is near inseparable from Mormon culture.

The only doctrinal aspect that I can think of that would produce such a culture is the literal establishment of a Zion community. But culture would ultimately come from the experience of building up Zion. The industrious side of Mormonism seems more cultural than theological, even if the culture was originally born out of theological principles.

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I think it is based on the scripture that…“The glory of God is intelligence”, that and a strong “work ethic”. We are push to excel and “magnify our callings”.

Would you agree?

Here is Artcle

Jews are another group that are disproportionately represented in many fields. LDS are just beginning to have a significant influence on society at large. More than anything, I think LDS culture teaches us to work hard, to endure hard times, to press forward, and to become educated. If a any person does this, there is a higher probability of becoming successful. It is not surprising when it happens.

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Jews are another group that are disproportionately represented in many fields. LDS are just beginning to have a significant influence on society at large. More than anything, I think LDS culture teaches us to work hard, to endure hard times, to press forward, and to become educated. If a any person does this, there is a higher probability of becoming successful. It is not surprising when it happens.

Keep in mind the age of the two faiths. Jews and Mormons.

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There are several influences built into the church system which enhance the ability of people to conduct themselves in a business like manner.

From the time of our youngest days we.....

Practice speaking in front of people

Have agendas

Learn how to run meetings

Develop systems of cooperation and work in both committee and groups (the two are different)

Are trained to take leadership and support positions

Among other things, especially for missionaries

Run meetings

Lead groups

Develop goals

Report and analyze the progress of those goals

Work closely with people who are neither friends nor family first

Understand rejection and continue forward enthusiastically

Change approaches

Again... speak publically

We also learn to articulate our ideas, focus on goals, develop relationships that are trusted and cooperative, and demand sacrifice of ourselves even as we ask it of others. We are taught to lead by example.

Many other churches do not offer the same opportunities beginning in a very young age and reinforced throughout the formative years.

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I think the structure and culture of (at least) American Mormonism leans toward business-oriented fields. Comes with the conservative Americanism that is near inseparable from Mormon culture.

The only doctrinal aspect that I can think of that would produce such a culture is the literal establishment of a Zion community. But culture would ultimately come from the experience of building up Zion. The industrious side of Mormonism seems more cultural than theological, even if the culture was originally born out of theological principles.

Out of our millenarianism too. Zion of course was an important aspect of that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

While the Christian post might not mention it (is there any link to the article? Just wondering), I think we might also want to recognize that when we keep the commandments we prosper in the land. That's the promise the Book of Mormon gives us.

There is a real reason for that. Not just because God pours out blessings upon us, but as mentioned it gives us the skills and the character to truly be successful in business and in life.

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I agree and disagree...

Keeping the commandments does not mean we will prosper economically. Many of the principles found in gospel naturally lead to properity, but they are no guarrantee. The return to Heavenly Father, and the blessings of the Atonement are the only guarrantees of the gospel, and technically the only focus we should have. The rest falls into place, hopefully for economic good as well, but certainly not necessarily.

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