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How do you think and feel about the (non denom) Know God campaign?


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I was left confused at the ad during the Super Bowl.  I was left with the same questions - who is putting this out?  What are they trying to accomplish?  Who is paying for it?    What is someone supposed to do with it?  Maybe I missed it, but it didn't seem to be tied to any organization or direct viewers to any website for further information.   Do they really think an add on TV is going to change people's hearts and covert them to Jesus if they weren't believers before?   

On the other hand, I do like the idea that there are people out there trying to inspire good in the world without any other ulterior motives of drawing attention to themselves or their organization, or to raise funds in some way.   Unless there is some long game here and creating some mystery is part of their campaign to generate further interest and discussion. 

The line between Jesus and football is very thin in some parts. 

Edited by pogi
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44 minutes ago, MustardSeed said:

 Lots of discussion on the amount of money put towards this campaign this am after their SB ad.  Also some discussion about where they get their funds, as well as what they support financially. 
 

 

I Believe the owners of Hobby Lobby are the backers. If so then I find their ads ironic.

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13 minutes ago, Teancum said:

I Believe the owners of Hobby Lobby are the backers. If so then I find their ads ironic.

In the Super Bowl ad, I think it showed the LGBTQ crowd, or I'm wrong. So are you pretty sure it is Hobby Lobby? 

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Quote

 

Among the donors behind the campaign is the family of billionaire Hobby Lobby co-founder David Green, whose son is a board member at Come Near.

The initiative is "backed by more than $100 million," according to AdWeek. 

 

 

Edited by california boy
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When I first started seeing these a few weeks ago I wanted to know who was paying for them.

Now I don’t like them.

5 hours ago, Teancum said:

I Believe the owners of Hobby Lobby are the backers. If so then I find their ads ironic.

Same.

I also find the image of Jesus they are selling to be a “feel good” version. I don’t trust people who use this approach.

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I went to the cite and found this…which I consider virtuous and praiseworthy.

With two spots in this year’s biggest professional football game, we wanted to ensure that our 15-second commercial, “Who Is My Neighbor,” built on the concept presented in the 60-second commercial, “Foot Washing.” We felt that if we were going to encourage others to love their neighbors, then we should provide some insight into whom that word includes, and while there are some surface-level observations as to who those people might be, we thought it would be best to explore how Jesus defined neighbors through his actions.

His belief was simple and unfiltered — everyone is a neighbor. Everyone in every sense of the word, not just the people in our orbit whom we have something in common with but also the ones we don’t notice, the people we don’t value, and those we don’t welcome. Admittedly, noticing people who aren’t loved ones or a part of our day-to-day life isn’t always top of mind. In a world that often feels more digital than tangible, it’s no secret that our ability to connect with each other is duller than it used to be. Not to mention, our attention at any given moment is being pulled into what feels like infinite directions.
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In a very different way, Jesus faced similar challenges. Sure, he didn’t have the distraction of a smartphone, but he was a popular guy who drew crowds. People sought his attention, yet he took time to give his to those who never got any. He noticed ill-stricken people with leprosy and comforted them. These were people who were ignored by everyone else, yet he displayed neighborly love toward them. We thought about the people we don’t notice in our own lives walking down the street, in the aisle at the grocery store, or even those living next door to us. Jesus’ example served as a simple yet powerful reminder that he put the “every” in everyone, so we wanted to create work that did the same.
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Jesus often led by example. In doing so, he led us to another type of neighbor — the ones we don’t value. During his time, women were relegated to subservient roles in a male-dominated society, but Jesus didn’t bend to the status quo. He spoke to women in public, which was a social taboo. He stood up for women during moments of injustice and involved them in ministry to boot. He valued women beyond their traditional roles and treated them kindly and equally. In our world, it’s easy to value those who share the same values as us or those who belong to the same groups, but we were inspired by Jesus’ willingness to defy that trend.

The third type of neighbor seemed to jump out at us after we examined Jesus’ life. We noticed that Jesus was inclined to welcome others. His trusted disciples were complete strangers when he met them, yet he welcomed them into his life and built his platform alongside them. He could’ve turned to family or others that he knew from his youth, but his prerogative was to find neighbors who were vastly different from him and one another to bring together. He was profoundly and deliberately backward in that way.
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We found these examples compelling and wanted to craft an ad that reflected what the unnoticed, the undervalued, and the unwelcomed might look like today in our own lives. Once we saw the images, the idea that everyone is a neighbor resonated even deeper with us. We saw each of these people as part of a whole. People we should offer compassion to because if they flourish, we all do. Each one of us is a part of one larger community. Jesus knew that all too well. It’s why he wanted us to use our differences as a catalyst for conversations that can lead us to invite each other in rather than keeping one another at bay.

Scripture References: Matthew 8, John 4:1-29, Mark 1:16
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I am on the fence about it. Here is Joseph Smith's teaching about the washing of feet, found on the the church website here: https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/history/topics/washing-of-feet?lang=eng

Washing of Feet

During the Last Supper, Jesus took a towel and a basin of water and washed the feet of the disciples.1 Some Christian groups followed this New Testament precedent, washing feet as a token of humility or brotherhood.2 A revelation to Joseph Smith in December 1832 required participants in the School of the Prophets to participate in the washing of feet. The Lord commanded the elders to “clean your hands, and your feet, before me” as witness that they were “clean, from the blood of this, wicked generation.”3 Joseph Smith and other members of the school first participated in this ordinance during the school’s first session in January 1833.4 As the construction of the Kirtland Temple neared completion, Joseph Smith explained to members of the school that the “ordinance of washing of feet” was a restoration of the New Testament practice “calculated to unite our hearts” and prepare the elders for an endowment of spiritual power.5 He further taught that the ordinance needed to be performed in a place “aside from the world.”6 Accordingly, on March 29 and 30, 1836, about 300 priesthood holders from the Kirtland area, including Joseph Smith and other Church leaders, met to wash one another’s feet.7

 

I get what they're trying to show, but the washing and anointing of feet is an ordinance that Jesus did not do for every person. At least according to the LDS church doctrines.

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11 hours ago, MustardSeed said:

 Lots of discussion on the amount of money put towards this campaign this am after their SB ad.  Also some discussion about where they get their funds, as well as what they support financially.

I didn't watch the Super Bowl so this was news to me.  Had to find it on YouTube.

Whoever made that ad might as well have been inspired by 3 Nephi 27:27:  "What manner of men [and women] ought ye to be? Verily I say unto you, even as I am."

I agree with the ad's message.

Imo the soundtrack left room for improvement.  Imo its tone is not at the same level as what the images are saying.

If you might like to see what I mean, try this:  First, cue up the Youtube video of the ad, get past the ad(s) Youtube imposes on you, and pause the video so it will start as soon as you unpause it. Then, MUTE IT.   Here's the link: Foot Washing - YouTube

Next, in another tab, open up this link and get past the YouTube ads and start the video:  A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief - YouTube

Now leave the second video playing so you that can hear its music, and click back over to the footwashing video (which has been MUTED), and watch it with the other video as the soundtrack. 

 

Edited by manol
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1 hour ago, bsjkki said:

On my X account, many Christian believers did not like the ad. It was very controversial. 

Same in areas where I have seen it discussed. Seems like it is trimmed down to try to appeal to the widest possibly audience and not sure who will end up liking it.

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14 hours ago, pogi said:

Do they really think an add on TV is going to change people's hearts and covert them to Jesus if they weren't believers before?   

I assume they believe those who love Jesus as God or even just view him as a good man/teacher might try to emulate him.  If the ad is something new to people, it might trigger something in how they see others or at least remind them in a time and place they don’t usually get reminded to think about it, which may increase the message’s impact.

I wonder why they did pictures rather than photos…photos would have a bigger impact on me at least, showing real people doing a real act, not wishful thinking on the part of the ad’s creators.

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4 hours ago, manol said:

Now leave the second video playing so you that can hear its music, and click back over to the footwashing video (which has been MUTED), and watch it with the other video as the soundtrack. 

Yeah, .Tabernacle Choir rarely emotionally moves me, I like my music to be a bit broken, and emotionally a struggle rather than something idealized as professional choirs often are opens me up more.  More bass, guitar and rough voices please.

Words I don’t really listen to until maybe the third time.  More focused on how the voice blends with the instruments.  It really annoys me when I have fallen in love with a song and then register it has distasteful lyrics.

Edited by Calm
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22 hours ago, pogi said:

Do they really think an add on TV is going to change people's hearts and covert them to Jesus if they weren't believers before?

No, but I suspect there are those who are approximating Christ without even consciously knowing it. I would imagine the hope is the add hits this population. It reminds me of a Lewis quote from Mere Christianity - "The world does not consist of 100% Christians and 100% non-Christian. There are people (a great many of then) who are slowly ceasing to be Christians but who still call themselves by that name: some of them are clergymen. There are others people who are slowly becoming Christian though they do not yet call themselves so."

Personally, I don't care for this type of proselyting. At times, putting humans in the act of doing something that Christ did makes me uncomfortable. It feels like this very sacred act is being co-opted.

Edited to add: We watched an episode of The Chosen last night. It portrayed the fledgling apostles going out into the communities and performing miracles. I had the same uncomfortable feeling while watching them heal the sick and afflicted. Good grief - I've become so jaded. : ( 

Edited by Vanguard
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18 hours ago, The Nehor said:

I also find the image of Jesus they are selling to be a “feel good” version. I don’t trust people who use this approach.

Is there any "feel bad" version? How would you describe it?

Are you aware that there are at least two parts of the power of Jesus' Atonement? One a free nonobligatory gift of the resurrection (possible for both the righteous and the wicked). The other entails faithful covenant keeping (and unconditional love) in order to attain higher degrees of glory.

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4 minutes ago, longview said:

Is there any "feel bad" version? How would you describe it?

Are you aware that there are at least two parts of the power of Jesus' Atonement? One a free non obligatory gift of the resurrection (possible for both the righteous and the wicked). The other entails faithful covenant keeping (and unconditional love) in order to attain higher degrees of glory.

I don't want to speak for Nehor but when people talk about the feel good version of Christ, as I understand them they are often talking about the version that some people have where Christ doesn't care what we do as long as we are generally "good" people.  He doesn't care if we keep the commandments, for example, and He definitely would never judge anyone for have premarital sex or cheating on a test or getting their 13 year old into the movies at the 11 year old price.

It's the version of Christ where He doesn't ever judge anyone negatively unless they kill puppies or murder people or believe in the wrong political ideology.

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