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Canadians…do you pronounce “decal” deck-al or dee-cal?


Calm

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13 minutes ago, Raingirl said:

I had to look it up in the he dictionary to see if this is an alternate pronunciation. It’s not. 

It probably is in a Canadian English dictionary. 
 

Canada has some interesting variations of pronunciation as well as words.  It is not just a combo of British and American.

https://www.artonetranslations.com/do-you-speak-canadian-english/#:~:text=Anti%3A Canadians say anty like,lev-er in the US

Edited by Calm
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2 hours ago, blackstrap said:

I just go with "stickers " 

Yeah, but is that the ones that require soaking, or just peel and paste?

To me a "decal" requires soaking and a "sticker" is peel and paste, eh?

 

 

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5 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

Yeah, but is that the ones that require soaking, or just peel and paste?

To me a "decal" requires soaking and a "sticker" is peel and paste, eh?

 

 

The word is short for decalcomania, a decorative technique by which engravings and prints are transferred to pottery or other materials. The technique was invented by Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called "décalquer" (which means "to copy by tracing"); it became widespread during the decal craze or mania of the late 19th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decal

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1 hour ago, ksfisher said:

The word is short for decalcomania, a decorative technique by which engravings and prints are transferred to pottery or other materials. The technique was invented by Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called "décalquer" (which means "to copy by tracing"); it became widespread during the decal craze or mania of the late 19th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decal

Wow, cool stuff, thanks!

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5 hours ago, ksfisher said:

The word is short for decalcomania, a decorative technique by which engravings and prints are transferred to pottery or other materials. The technique was invented by Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called "décalquer" (which means "to copy by tracing"); it became widespread during the decal craze or mania of the late 19th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decal

I am glad to see that others can get obsessive about details like myself even on holidays when we should be paying attention to family stuff…we had like 30 minutes conversation on this with the family last night, lol, including “decalcomania” and why “mania” (apparently the English**** went crazy with decorating everything with ‘decals’ for awhile ;) ).

Quote

borrowed from French décalcomanie, from décalquer "to trace, transfer by tracing" (from dé- DE- + calquer "to trace, copy") + -o- -O- + -manie -MANIA, after potichomanie"the art of imitating painted porcelain ware," earlier presumably "craze for vases imitating Chinese porcelain," compound with potiche "rounded or polygonal vase with a separate cover, originally one made in China" — more at CALQUE

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/decalcomania

****you would think it was the French going manic for decals**, but it was the English due to Ravenet transfering himself to England and then “perfecting the process”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decalcomania
 

**technically it wasn’t “decals” as that is the mass produced versions of the process, not the individual/unique/‘one off’ or DIY projects.

Edited by Calm
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I don't have anything to contribute to the Canadian deck-al or dee-cal debate.  Sorry. :unknw:  I hope no one will mind me sharing a (I hope) funny story.  By chance, I found out a High Councilor in the Stake I was in at the time speaks Spanish, so I was dusting off my rusty Spanish skills and conversing with him a bit.  The Second Counselor in the Bishopric of my ward at the time, a Canadian, also was there.  He commented, "It always makes me feel a bit nervous when people around me start conversing with each other in a language I don't know."  I told him, "I know.  I get the same feeling when people start speaking Canadian around me." ;) :D

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5 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I don't have anything to contribute to the Canadian deck-al or dee-cal debate.  Sorry. :unknw:  I hope no one will mind me sharing a (I hope) funny story.  By chance, I found out a High Councilor in the Stake I was in at the time speaks Spanish, so I was dusting off my rusty Spanish skills and conversing with him a bit.  The Second Counselor in the Bishopric of my ward at the time, a Canadian, also was there.  He commented, "It always makes me feel a bit nervous when people around me start conversing with each other in a language I don't know."  I told him, "I know.  I get the same feeling when people start speaking Canadian around me." ;) :D

For some reason, this reminded me of when I moved from Minnesota to Oregon.  I was at work, speaking to someone on the phone, when they commented on my accent, and asked me if I was from Canada. 
 

I didn’t think I had any accent at all. And, no, I did not sound like the characters in ‘Fargo’!

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3 hours ago, Raingirl said:

For some reason, this reminded me of when I moved from Minnesota to Oregon.  I was at work, speaking to someone on the phone, when they commented on my accent, and asked me if I was from Canada. 
 

I didn’t think I had any accent at all. And, no, I did not sound like the characters in ‘Fargo’!

I have a Utah accent! ;) :D

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3 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I have a Utah accent! ;) :D

How spatial! 

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23 hours ago, ksfisher said:

The word is short for decalcomania, a decorative technique by which engravings and prints are transferred to pottery or other materials. The technique was invented by Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called "décalquer" (which means "to copy by tracing"); it became widespread during the decal craze or mania of the late 19th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decal

When I saw the OP, the word decalcomania immediately clicked into my brain, one of those obsessive details that it seems to hold onto for decades for no apparent reason (as opposed to things I'd like to remember that are actually useful). And I was going to post about that word, but you got there first! Good work!

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13 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I don't have anything to contribute to the Canadian deck-al or dee-cal debate.  Sorry. :unknw:  I hope no one will mind me sharing a (I hope) funny story.  By chance, I found out a High Councilor in the Stake I was in at the time speaks Spanish, so I was dusting off my rusty Spanish skills and conversing with him a bit.  The Second Counselor in the Bishopric of my ward at the time, a Canadian, also was there.  He commented, "It always makes me feel a bit nervous when people around me start conversing with each other in a language I don't know."  I told him, "I know.  I get the same feeling when people start speaking Canadian around me." ;) :D

I've also run into people who get nervous if others around them speak a language they don't understand, and I get nervous about those people. Do such people have paranoid tendencies? "They might be talking about me! I may be in danger! I must pre-emptively attack before they get me!"

I don't want to be in the way when they explode.

My first reaction is to listen carefully in order to try figure out what language they are speaking. Because I love languages! Can't get enough of them! My father used to occasionally tune into the UHF TV channels to listen in on the ones broadcasting in a foreign language, to try to pick out what they were saying. My mom, on the other hand, couldn't stand it. I think she just wanted to understand what was being said, but had no patience for it like dad did.

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