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Murder-Suicide of "Mormon" Family in Maryland


smac97

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Terrible:

Quote

Mormon father, wife and 3 children found fatally shot at Maryland home

By Leonardo Blair, Senior Features Reporter
 
Three years after losing his youngest son to cancer, a father who served as a missionary with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was found fatally shot at his Maryland home along with his wife and their three children Friday in what police are investigating as an apparent murder-suicide.

I have commented on this before, but I find it problematic when a member of the Church does some terrible thing, some news outlets go to great lengths to emphasize the person's membership in the Church.

If that membership is germane and relevant to the misconduct, then such references are appropriate (e.g., stories about "affinity fraud" in which members of the Church prey on other members through shared membership).  

Quote

Cecil County police identified the father as Marcus Edward Milligan, 39, and his wife as Tara Devina Ricker Milligan, 37. The couple’s daughters, Teresa Milligan, 14, Nora Milligan, 11, and their 8-year-old son, Finn Milligan, were also identified.

"This is a tragic and terrible day for our county and our community," Sheriff Scott Adams noted at a press conference Friday, WBAL-TV11 reported. "Any time you have a loss to these levels — any loss is terrible, but a loss of this level, which is not a common thing, it's certainly not a common thing here in Cecil County — it's tragic and terrible and takes a long time for people to process."

Police received a call about the shootings near Elk Mills Road shortly after 9:15 a.m. by a man who said that the children and a woman were fatally shot, The Daily Voice reported.

The sheriff’s office said the man hung up shortly after giving brief details about the shootings. When they tried calling him back, they got no answer.

When they got to the home, Marcus Milligan’s body was found in a detached garage next to a semiautomatic weapon. The bodies of his wife and children were found scattered inside the home.
...

The shootings come just under a week after Tara Milligan openly mourned the loss of their son Conor to cancer three years earlier. She said she was yearning to spend a moment with her deceased son.

“Time passes so strangely in grief. Somehow it’s been three whole years since we had to say goodbye to Conor. What wouldn’t I give for another perfect moment like this one, even if just for a heartbeat,” she wrote in a Facebook post.

He lost a son to cancer, then (apparently) killed the rest of his family, then himself.

No words, really.

-Smac

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7 minutes ago, smac97 said:

Terrible:

I have commented on this before, but I find it problematic when a member of the Church does some terrible thing, some news outlets go to great lengths to emphasize the person's membership in the Church.

If that membership is germane and relevant to the misconduct, then such references are appropriate (e.g., stories about "affinity fraud" in which members of the Church prey on other members through shared membership).  

He lost a son to cancer, then (apparently) killed the rest of his family, then himself.

No words, really.

-Smac

We do hold ourselves up as an "ensign to the nations," with both the positive and negative consequences that follow.

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7 hours ago, smac97 said:

Terrible:

I have commented on this before, but I find it problematic when a member of the Church does some terrible thing, some news outlets go to great lengths to emphasize the person's membership in the Church.

If that membership is germane and relevant to the misconduct, then such references are appropriate (e.g., stories about "affinity fraud" in which members of the Church prey on other members through shared membership).  

He lost a son to cancer, then (apparently) killed the rest of his family, then himself.

No words, really.

-Smac

The only explanation I can come up with is the belief that the after life, even in the Telestial kingdom is better than this life that came from Joseph Smith, or allegedly did. Here's an article speaking about it connected with suicide. I wonder if this man wanted to be with their son so much and believed it's better than this life.

http://lifeongoldplates.blogspot.com/2008/12/committing-suicide-to-get-to-telestial.html

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2 hours ago, Tacenda said:

The only explanation I can come up with is the belief that the after life, even in the Telestial kingdom is better than this life that came from Joseph Smith, or allegedly did. Here's an article speaking about it connected with suicide. I wonder if this man wanted to be with their son so much and believed it's better than this life.

http://lifeongoldplates.blogspot.com/2008/12/committing-suicide-to-get-to-telestial.html

Ehh. I would go with what's most common in these cases (at least according to research), some form of abuse/impulse issues, enmeshment, and throw in unchecked serious mental health issues. What people use to justify this usually runs on whatever they have around them to prop up what makes them feel good or justifies their impulses. These are usually the branches rather than the root of a very sick tree. You'd be surprised what sticks for people, it doesn't have to be that overt of a connection to their pathology either. One of the worst cases I heard of entailed using prayer and revelation to control others. Another more mild case of abuse had used messages on unity. But it doesn't have to be religious or spiritual...most justifications that prop up or mask abuse aren't. There's a chance there was little evidence for abuse...but in these cases most the time there is. 

 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-human-equation/202003/the-tragedy-murder-suicides

9 hours ago, smac97 said:

Terrible:

I have commented on this before, but I find it problematic when a member of the Church does some terrible thing, some news outlets go to great lengths to emphasize the person's membership in the Church.

If that membership is germane and relevant to the misconduct, then such references are appropriate (e.g., stories about "affinity fraud" in which members of the Church prey on other members through shared membership).  

He lost a son to cancer, then (apparently) killed the rest of his family, then himself.

No words, really.

-Smac

 On the bright side, when i googled his name, this was literally the only article with the title talking about their religion. Most identifies them by where they lived or with relevant details about the case. 

 

With luv,

BD

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1 hour ago, CA Steve said:

In the last Olympics I watched I was very pleased to see stories about Mormon athletes who were participating.

I think we have to take the good with the bad.

I think discussion in the article is probably right. Being a Latter-day Saint is a huge part of member’s identity. The headline seems a bit much, but given the source it makes sense. 

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9 hours ago, BlueDreams said:

Ehh. I would go with what's most common in these cases (at least according to research), some form of abuse/impulse issues, enmeshment, and throw in unchecked serious mental health issues. What people use to justify this usually runs on whatever they have around them to prop up what makes them feel good or justifies their impulses. These are usually the branches rather than the root of a very sick tree. You'd be surprised what sticks for people, it doesn't have to be that overt of a connection to their pathology either. One of the worst cases I heard of entailed using prayer and revelation to control others. Another more mild case of abuse had used messages on unity. But it doesn't have to be religious or spiritual...most justifications that prop up or mask abuse aren't. There's a chance there was little evidence for abuse...but in these cases most the time there is. 

 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-human-equation/202003/the-tragedy-murder-suicides

 On the bright side, when i googled his name, this was literally the only article with the title talking about their religion. Most identifies them by where they lived or with relevant details about the case. 

 

With luv,

BD

 

"The vast majority of murder-suicides are born out of desperation and depression, not devotion. They occur in the context of a controlling, yet emotionally dependent relationship that is threatened in some way and are, I suspect, committed by a partner who wants to end his or her own pain but who—deep down—can’t bear the thought of loved ones living happily without him."

Wow, I'd never thought much about this unspeakable act...this makes a lot of sense when it comes to this mostly male violence event.  

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On 9/13/2022 at 10:51 AM, smac97 said:

I have commented on this before, but I find it problematic when a member of the Church does some terrible thing, some news outlets go to great lengths to emphasize the person's membership in the Church.

No kidding.  Here is an example of when a m/s happens, and the news outlets do NOT go to any lengths to emphasize the folks' membership.  These folks were LDS:

https://gazette.com/thetribune/black-forest-husband-wife-identified-in-apparent-murder-suicide/article_85250256-1fd5-11ed-ab3c-07076b9ff143.html

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On 9/13/2022 at 10:51 AM, smac97 said:

Terrible:

I have commented on this before, but I find it problematic when a member of the Church does some terrible thing, some news outlets go to great lengths to emphasize the person's membership in the Church.

If that membership is germane and relevant to the misconduct, then such references are appropriate (e.g., stories about "affinity fraud" in which members of the Church prey on other members through shared membership).  

He lost a son to cancer, then (apparently) killed the rest of his family, then himself.

No words, really.

-Smac

 

On 9/13/2022 at 10:59 AM, ksfisher said:

We do hold ourselves up as an "ensign to the nations," with both the positive and negative consequences that follow.

It’s an age-old criticism, and not without some merit, that news media go out of their way to emphasize the religious affiliation of Church members accused of wrongdoing.

Boyd K. Packer pointed out that this in a sense is a backhanded compliment implying that the public at large expects better of Latter-day Saints. 

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