Jump to content

Names and terms that are no longer used


Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, bluebell said:

The YW in our ward are not divided in this way.  We have three classes.  Some YW organizations only have one.  Others have more than three.  It really depends on the number of girls, their ages, and how the presidency wants to divide them up.

Right. What I showed was my CA ward. 

Link to comment
2 hours ago, Calm said:

The second is fine. 
 

Bluebell, Jinx!

I've been using LDS on the board, is that a no-no too. You mentioned the second one only, maybe I'll need to quit being lazy and do that from now on.

Link to comment
13 minutes ago, Tacenda said:

I've been using LDS on the board, is that a no-no too. You mentioned the second one only, maybe I'll need to quit being lazy and do that from now on.

It means you're evil, like me. 😈

Link to comment
19 minutes ago, Tacenda said:

I've been using LDS on the board, is that a no-no too. You mentioned the second one only, maybe I'll need to quit being lazy and do that from now on.

Latter-day Saint is what is officially mentioned, iirc.  I took my cue from scriptures and the book title Saints and just use Saints (capitalized to show it is a proper name as I see saints as any Christian according to the NT), but only on this board and FAIR as I know it will be understood by context.  Elsewhere what I use depends on who I am talking with.

Edited by Calm
Link to comment
6 hours ago, bluebell said:

The followers of Christ were called saints in the NT, so I think the use of Latter-day Saints is meant to have the same (familiar to all Christians) connotation.

I was a convert, and lived most of my life in communities where the membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was a tiny minority.  It seemed to me that, outside of the membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the connotation of the word "saint" is dominated by the Catholic usage of the term, to such an extent that to outsiders it seems pretentious for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints refer to themselves at "Saints", even moreso with that capital "S".

Neither Merriam-Webster nor Oxford list "followers of Christ in the New Testament" among the definitions for the word, at least not online, so I'm not sure that connotation is really common knowledge:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/saint

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/saint

I took the usage of the term as just another part of the package deal of being a "peculiar people", and in practice explaining the usage of the term in the name of the Church was arguably a rather friendly, no-pressure missionary opportunity.

Edited by manol
Link to comment
4 minutes ago, manol said:

I was a convert, and lived most of my life in communities where the membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was a tiny minority.  It seemed to me that, outside of the membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the connotation of the word "saint" is dominated by the Catholic usage of the term, to such an extent that to outsiders it seems pretentious that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints refer to themselves at "Saints", even moreso with that capital "S".

Neither Merriam-Webster nor Oxford list "followers of Christ in the New Testament" among the definitions for the word, at least not online, so I'm not sure that connotation is really common knowledge:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/saint

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/saint

I took the usage of the term as just another part of the package deal of being a "peculiar people", and in practice explaining the usage of the term in the name of the Church was arguably a rather friendly, no-pressure missionary opportunity.

You don't think that most Christians are aware that the followers of Christ were referred to as saints in the NT?  I guess maybe I'm assuming they read the bible more than they actually do.

Link to comment
18 minutes ago, bluebell said:

You don't think that most Christians are aware that the followers of Christ were referred to as saints in the NT?  I guess maybe I'm assuming they read the bible more than they actually do.

That is probably the case.

Also, I think a person is more likely to make note of how a word is used in the Bible when it's part of the name of their religion.   For instance, my guess is that a Baptist is likely to notice when their word pops up, which admittedly is not nearly as often.   

Edited by manol
Link to comment
5 hours ago, MrShorty said:

It seems curious to me that "junior Primary" would make the list of names/terms no longer in use, but not "senior Primary." Last time I substituted in Primary (which wasn't that long ago), our ward's primary was still large enough to separate into two groups: younger and older, so it seems "odd" that we would get rid of the "junior" designation, but not the "senior" designation.

I suppose it's possible that someone just overlooked including "senior Primary" in this list?

When we exit opening exercises to go to class, the older kids are usually in the hallway waiting to go in for opening exercises. I like to say "Oh boy, it's the older kids" as we walk by. It seems to get a positive reaction from both the older kiddos and my younger class as everyone giggles. ; )

Link to comment
45 minutes ago, manol said:

I was a convert, and lived most of my life in communities where the membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was a tiny minority.  It seemed to me that, outside of the membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the connotation of the word "saint" is dominated by the Catholic usage of the term, to such an extent that to outsiders it seems pretentious that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints refer to themselves at "Saints", even moreso with that capital "S".

Neither Merriam-Webster nor Oxford list "followers of Christ in the New Testament" among the definitions for the word, at least not online, so I'm not sure that connotation is really common knowledge:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/saint

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/saint

I took the usage of the term as just another part of the package deal of being a "peculiar people", and in practice explaining the usage of the term in the name of the Church was arguably a rather friendly, no-pressure missionary opportunity.

English has an amazingly rich and diverse vocabulary. Not every language is as lucky. In Spanish, the word "los santos" can either be translated as "saints" or as "holy ones." I can see why that could come across as pretentious. 

Makes we wonder what connotations the word used in the Church's name has in other languages.

Edited to add: off topic, but...I giggled a bit in the MTC when I first learned that "the Lord" is translated as "el Senor" in Spanish. The Mister, I thought to myslef.

Edited by Stormin' Mormon
Link to comment
1 hour ago, Stormin' Mormon said:

English has an amazingly rich and diverse vocabulary. Not every language is as lucky. In Spanish, the word "los santos" can either be translated as "saints" or as "holy ones." I can see why that could come across as pretentious. 

Makes we wonder what connotations the word used in the Church's name has in other languages.

Edited to add: off topic, but...I giggled a bit in the MTC when I first learned that "the Lord" is translated as "el Senor" in Spanish. The Mister, I thought to myslef.

In German the word "Heiligen" is used which mean "sanctified" or "holy people"

Link to comment
10 hours ago, Stormin' Mormon said:

Makes we wonder what connotations the word used in the Church's name has in other languages.

Latter-day Saints in French comes across like Saints of the Last Days. Door approaches always ended up being trying to explain that we weren't messengers from some doomsday cult

Link to comment
11 hours ago, Stormin' Mormon said:

Makes we wonder what connotations the word used in the Church's name has in other languages.

Indonesian is Orang Suci Zaman Akhir, which literally is Person Holy Era Final or Holy Person (the common term for 'saint' in the Bible but also generally) of the Final Era, once one accounts for syntax. It sounds really nice to me.

People are impacted by what they call themselves. 'Mormon' has no inherent meaning but sounds -- and basically functions -- as an ethnonym of some kind. For this reason, I still use it to refer to people whose connection to the Church is purely cultural.

LDS, like all other initialisms, means even less, and in fact, it could mean almost anything.

But if I tell people, including myself, that I am a Saint, then I have something very specific and very discrete to live up to.

Link to comment
18 hours ago, jkwilliams said:

Mormon

Latter-day Saint

LDS

Latter-day Saint has not been removed. In fact, it has been prescribed as an acceptable replacement for the other two items on your list. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
Link to comment
7 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Latter-day Saint has not been removed. In fact, it has been prescribed as an acceptable replacement for the other two items in your list. 

I'd never felt comfortable being called a saint. But the other day I read on the board that there is more meaning with it, and in the Bible it means followers of Jesus Christ. This is totally new to me, and I'm 60, late again to the game. I'd always thought it mean't your really good or something.

Edited by Tacenda
Link to comment
15 hours ago, Tacenda said:

I've been using LDS on the board, is that a no-no too. You mentioned the second one only, maybe I'll need to quit being lazy and do that from now on.

When President Nelson asked us not to refer to Church members as Mormons, he also asked that we discontinue the “LDS” initialism as well. Latter-day Saint is acceptable, presumably because it is part of the formal name of the Church, a name given by divine revelation. 

Link to comment
1 minute ago, Tacenda said:

So where is Jesus in Latter-day Saint? It's the same to me. And I've never felt comfortable being called a saint. But the other day I read on the board that there is more meaning with it, and in the Bible it means followers of Jesus Christ. This is totally new to me, and I'm 60, late again to the game. I'd always thought it mean't your really good or something.

I already answered your question in my post which I was apparently composing at the same time as you were composing yours. I refer you to it. 
 

Yes, saints is a New Testament term that meant followers of Christ long before the term took on any of the sectarian connotations it has today. 

Link to comment
11 hours ago, JAHS said:

In German the word "Heiligen" is used which mean "sanctified" or "holy people"

Similar to German, the word in the Swedish translation of the name of the Church is helige. And it carries the same meaning in the Swedish Bible translation as saints does in the King James Version. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
Link to comment
18 hours ago, JAHS said:

30 names and terms that are no longer used by the Church

Interesting how they have made changes to remove any possible negative connotations regarding the terms:

bishop’s court (instead use ward membership council)
disfellowship, disfellowshipment (this term was replaced by formal membership restrictons in the new handbook)
excommunication (this term was replaced by withdrawal of membership in the new handbook)
family home evening (instead use home evening) For those who have no family?
homemaking meeting (Relief Society) For those who are not or don't want to be homemakers?
welfare committee (stake or ward) 

Homemaking meeting hasn’t been a part of Relief Society for many years. For a while, it was replaced by what they called “Home, Family and Personal Enrichment Meeting” (later shortened to “Enrichment Meeting), but I think even that has been discontinued. 

Link to comment
13 hours ago, manol said:

I took the usage of the term as just another part of the package deal of being a "peculiar people", and in practice explaining the usage of the term in the name of the Church was arguably a rather friendly, no-pressure missionary opportunity.

If adhering to doctrinal concepts and practices that were in the original, New Testament church is part of what makes us a peculiar people, I guess I would say, guilty as charged. 

Link to comment
4 hours ago, Tacenda said:

I'd never felt comfortable being called a saint. But the other day I read on the board that there is more meaning with it, and in the Bible it means followers of Jesus Christ. This is totally new to me, and I'm 60, late again to the game. I'd always thought it mean't your really good or something.

Check out Elder Renlund's GC talk from April 2015 (Latter-day Saints Keep on Trying). In it, he quotes Nelson Mandela, with my very favoritest definition of saint: 

Quote

Mandela frequently deflected accolades by saying, “I’m no saint —that is, unless you think a saint is a sinner who keeps on trying.”

 

Edited by Stormin' Mormon
Link to comment
5 hours ago, Stormin' Mormon said:

Check out Elder Renlund's GC talk from April 2015 (Latter-day Saints Keep on Trying). In it, he quotes Nelson Mandela, with my very favoritest definition of saint: 

 

Thanks, I will. 

 

12 hours ago, Zosimus said:

Latter-day Saints in French comes across like Saints of the Last Days. Door approaches always ended up being trying to explain that we weren't messengers from some doomsday cult

 

22 hours ago, Stormin' Mormon said:

English has an amazingly rich and diverse vocabulary. Not every language is as lucky. In Spanish, the word "los santos" can either be translated as "saints" or as "holy ones." I can see why that could come across as pretentious. 

Makes we wonder what connotations the word used in the Church's name has in other languages.

Edited to add: off topic, but...I giggled a bit in the MTC when I first learned that "the Lord" is translated as "el Senor" in Spanish. The Mister, I thought to myslef.

Not to derail, but as far as translations go, I thought this was cute:

May be an image of road and text that says 'My inner 12-year-old will be giggling torever, now that know the Norwegian phrase for speed bump is "Farts-humper"... Farts- humper 40'

Link to comment
5 minutes ago, Tacenda said:

Thanks, I will. 

 

 

Not to derail, but as far as translations go, I thought this was cute:

May be an image of road and text that says 'My inner 12-year-old will be giggling torever, now that know the Norwegian phrase for speed bump is "Farts-humper"... Farts- humper 40'

Not to derail your derail, but the English word 'payday' in Portuguese (peidei) means 'I farted'. You can imagine the high jinx we played with new American Elders when they arrived in Brazil. "So Elder, what do we call the day when we can pick up our monthly money allocation?" "Oh, it's payday!" Now put this exchange while we're on a rush hour bus full of Brazilians and you can imagine the reaction... ;o

Link to comment
29 minutes ago, Vanguard said:

Not to derail your derail, but the English word 'payday' in Portuguese (peidei) means 'I farted'. You can imagine the high jinx we played with new American Elders when they arrived in Brazil. "So Elder, what do we call the day when we can pick up our monthly money allocation?" "Oh, it's payday!" Now put this exchange while we're on a rush hour bus full of Brazilians and you can imagine the reaction... ;o

Hahahaha!!! That's interesting how many things mean that word, lol.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...