Jump to content

Is the moon hollow?


rodheadlee

Recommended Posts

Yes, I have been watching Ancient Alien Astronauts. Funny thing is we had a discussion Christmas Day about the moon ringing like a bell when it was struck by Apollo Lander power units. It was intentionally struck twice and we had placed seismic sensors on the moon. The second strike what is equivalent to 11 tons of TNT and the moon rang like a bell for 3 hours.

There is also an ancient Zulu Legend that the moon was towed into place. Do y'all have anything to add to this that's cool?

Edited by rodheadlee
Link to comment

Von Däniken was such a great kidder.

I'm reasonably certain that the Moon is just as hollow as the earth. And aside from actual moonquakes, plenty of small meteorites strike the moon every day, so it's going to ring like a bell every day.

Link to comment
51 minutes ago, Stargazer said:

Von Däniken was such a great kidder.

I'm reasonably certain that the Moon is just as hollow as the earth. And aside from actual moonquakes, plenty of small meteorites strike the moon every day, so it's going to ring like a bell every day.

Why are the center of the craters convex?

Link to comment
Quote

4–3.5 billion years ago, the Moon could have had sufficient atmosphere and liquid water on its surface.  Warm and pressurized regions in the Moon's interior might still contain liquid water.

The presence of large quantities of water on the Moon would be an important factor in rendering lunar habitation cost-effective since transporting water (or hydrogen and oxygen) from Earth would be prohibitively expensive. If future investigations find the quantities to be particularly large, water ice could be mined to provide liquid water for drinking and plant propagation, and the water could also be split into hydrogen and oxygen by solar panel-equipped electric power stations or a nuclear generator, providing breathable oxygen as well as the components of rocket fuel. The hydrogen component of the water ice could also be used to draw out the oxides in the lunar soil and harvest even more oxygen.

Analysis of lunar ice would also provide scientific information about the impact history of the Moon and the abundance of comets and asteroids in the early Inner Solar System.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_water

 

Edited by Robert F. Smith
Link to comment
1 hour ago, rodheadlee said:

Why are the center of the craters convex?

You mean, why do some craters have central peaks? There are apparently a number of theories, but not one that is universally accepted.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_crater#When_central_peaks_form

Central peak craters are apparently not restricted to the Moon.

Link to comment
1 hour ago, Stargazer said:

You mean, why do some craters have central peaks? There are apparently a number of theories, but not one that is universally accepted.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_crater#When_central_peaks_form

Central peak craters are apparently not restricted to the Moon.

No. Domes. The pictures they were showing, the craters appeared to be domed. A gradual dome, like the surface beneath was curved. 

Link to comment
15 minutes ago, Derl Sanderson said:

The moon is solid. All conversant Church members know that it's the earth that is hollow. It's in that space where the Lost Ten Tribes are to be found. Aren't you reading ahead in the Old Testament Come Follow Me materials??

I know that story.  How does that make the moon solid?

Link to comment
14 hours ago, rodheadlee said:

No. Domes. The pictures they were showing, the craters appeared to be domed. A gradual dome, like the surface beneath was curved. 

I think that's just a special case of central peak. This happens in terrestrial vulcanism. The collapse of a volcanic peak (due to evacuation of the magma chamber) is frequently followed by uplift due to partial chamber refilling. Naturally, this resembles a dome. If you examine the remnant of the Mount St. Helens volcano after its 1980 eruption, there arose a subsequent lava dome.

For meteor or asteroid strikes, a similar process occurs.

Link to comment
7 hours ago, Derl Sanderson said:

Takes longer to get to the punch line than your standard Norm MacDonald joke (and not nearly as funny).

Yes it does, and no, it isn't! I agree with you entirely. It's actually me! It was a joke I heard a really long time ago, and I'm pretty sure it was shorter when I heard it, but being the long-winded sort, I just couldn't make it any shorter on such short notice. Especially since I was just winging the narration off the cuff rather than a script. I make better videos on my regular channel, or so I believe, anyway.

I posted this video to a YouTube channel I've not used for uploads to this point, but the topic here on MDDB reminded me of the joke, and I couldn't hold back. The channel avatar, by the way, is a photo of my Dad, who was much handsomer than I am.

Edited by Stargazer
Link to comment

It's interesting what different cultures have to say about the moon, Kaguya Hime (wood cutter story) is probably my favorite.  I think Sailor Moon was partially inspired by it.  

Tossing this out there, when it comes to the celestial bodies I've noticed most of the E.Asia ones have some kind of Chinese court influence, even when they get ported to other E.Asian countries.  I'm kinda curious what the natives and Polynesians have lore wise, I really should know some of the latter, shame on me.  

Edited by poptart
Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...