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Hugh B. Brown - Biographical Updates?


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Good early morning all. I enjoy reading about the lives of LDS apostles - from the very earliest to the latest. Hugh B Brown is rising to the top as one of my very favorite. I have two questions for this esteemed group. 1. Are there any recent biographical works about and insight into his life? 2. In the pantheon of LDS apostles, how is he perceived? He was a farmer, soldier, and lawyer. He suffered from a severe nerve disease and paralysis. He seemed to have a great sense of humor and openness to the importance of intellectual pursuit. He was a colleague, friend, and partner to J Reuben Clark, another of my favorites. I think it would have been a great trip to sit with the two of them on some train ride from SLC to Washington DC. I would want to simply sit and listen - not an easy feat for me.

I would appreciate any insight you all might offer into this man and his life. He seemed so full of life despite his physical illness. I like that! I am especially interested in how he is viewed today as an apostle, leader, and thinker in the church? Thanks so much.

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He had a bio written about him by Eugene Campbell and Richard Poll and then he dictated, I think, his own autobiography, "An Abundant Life". He came to where I live in 1970 and people that were there STILL talk about it! As far as I know there haven't been any bios written on him since these two were done in the '70's. I know Richard Bushman wrote a Dialogue article about his mission presidency in England in the 1930-40's. 

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2 hours ago, longview said:

Are you familiar with Elder Brown's masterful parable of the Currant Bush?  See https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/new-era/1973/01/the-currant-bush?lang=eng

Yes, I have heard an audio recording of it in his own voice. He reminds me a bit of Paul Harvey when he speaks. I do a lot of tree trimming on our property here in Mexico. I often think of this story while I am pruning. It seems like he was a gifted story teller. I like that a lot!

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15 hours ago, Navidad said:

Good early morning all. I enjoy reading about the lives of LDS apostles - from the very earliest to the latest. Hugh B Brown is rising to the top as one of my very favorite. I have two questions for this esteemed group. 1. Are there any recent biographical works about and insight into his life? 2. In the pantheon of LDS apostles, how is he perceived? He was a farmer, soldier, and lawyer. He suffered from a severe nerve disease and paralysis. He seemed to have a great sense of humor and openness to the importance of intellectual pursuit. He was a colleague, friend, and partner to J Reuben Clark, another of my favorites. I think it would have been a great trip to sit with the two of them on some train ride from SLC to Washington DC. I would want to simply sit and listen - not an easy feat for me.

I would appreciate any insight you all might offer into this man and his life. He seemed so full of life despite his physical illness. I like that! I am especially interested in how he is viewed today as an apostle, leader, and thinker in the church? Thanks so much.

Just as long as they don’t insist on singing….oh wait, that was Heber J. Grant!

He was a wonderful man. I loved his conference talks. We are usually more concerned with the current apostles and prophets than those who have passed, no matter their stature or accomplishments. That is not to denigrate nor diminish them nor their contributions in any way.

Edited by Bernard Gui
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16 hours ago, Bernard Gui said:

Just as long as they don’t insist on singing….oh wait, that was Heber J. Grant!

He was a wonderful man. I loved his conference talks. We are usually more concerned with the current apostles and prophets than those who have passed, no matter their stature or accomplishments. That is not to denigrate nor diminish them nor their contributions in any way.

Thanks for the reply. I understand (I think) the prioritization of current apostles. I simply enjoy reading the diversity of thought, the thunderings,  the poetry, beauty etc. of the earlier gentlemen, especially of those from the late 19th century who had their baptism (literally) in the very early church.  Sermons and revelations like the Sunset Wilderness Revelation of Wilford Woodruff (January 1880) are so powerful and Book of Revelation-like. They will really preach!

I also enjoy learning what the record tells us how (the process) it was decided whether these revelations were adopted or not by the Brethren as "canonical" or not, for lack of a better word . It is also enjoyable to see how the homiletic style from the earlier apostles to the current ones has changed over the years. I think the 1930s were a real turning point.  I enjoyed reading the Shepherd brothers' books on general conference talks. Very interesting. I got to know them from some correspondence some years ago. Then to my surprise and delight, I sat right next to them (The Shepherd twins)  in the tabernacle choir loft at a MHA Sunday morning devotional talk by Rick Turley. We all, probably 150 or so of us got to sing "Come Come Ye Saints" in the choir loft.  We were right up by the big bass wooden pipes. I couldn't hear for a week! Rick Turley fascinated me that morning when he recalled how Dwight Moody, the famous fundamentalist evangelist moved the Saints with his preaching from that very same spot! That was fascinating for me. A few weeks later Rick sent me the clippings, etc. from Moody's preaching in the tabernacle. So much history and so little time!

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I just ordered:

The Abundant Life: Hugh B. Brown, written by its subject, and

Hugh B. Brown: His Life and Thought, by Eugene E. Campbell

from Thriftbooks.  

They're not recent, so you may have read them already.  If not, when I'm done with them, I'll let you have them. :D 

Edited by Kenngo1969
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10 hours ago, Navidad said:

Thanks for the reply. I understand (I think) the prioritization of current apostles. I simply enjoy reading the diversity of thought, the thunderings,  the poetry, beauty etc. of the earlier gentlemen, especially of those from the late 19th century who had their baptism (literally) in the very early church.  Sermons and revelations like the Sunset Wilderness Revelation of Wilford Woodruff (January 1880) are so powerful and Book of Revelation-like. They will really preach!

I also enjoy learning what the record tells us how (the process) it was decided whether these revelations were adopted or not by the Brethren as "canonical" or not, for lack of a better word . It is also enjoyable to see how the homiletic style from the earlier apostles to the current ones has changed over the years. I think the 1930s were a real turning point.  I enjoyed reading the Shepherd brothers' books on general conference talks. Very interesting. I got to know them from some correspondence some years ago. Then to my surprise and delight, I sat right next to them (The Shepherd twins)  in the tabernacle choir loft at a MHA Sunday morning devotional talk by Rick Turley. We all, probably 150 or so of us got to sing "Come Come Ye Saints" in the choir loft.  We were right up by the big bass wooden pipes. I couldn't hear for a week! Rick Turley fascinated me that morning when he recalled how Dwight Moody, the famous fundamentalist evangelist moved the Saints with his preaching from that very same spot! That was fascinating for me. A few weeks later Rick sent me the clippings, etc. from Moody's preaching in the tabernacle. So much history and so little time!

Thanks for the comments! I think the turning point was the passing of LeGrand Richards. He was the last of the firebrands. Neal A. Maxwell was a firebrand of sorts but with a much more refined fire. I saw the famous talk when Elder Richards put his hand over the red light on the pulpit warning that his allotted time had elapsed. I also heard a famous preacher tell a whopper of a lie about him during an anti-Mormon lecture in a Rockford IL Lutheran church about 1977. He said he once attended an LDS Conference where he heard the famous Mormon Apostle LeGrand Richards preach. Elder Richards read a Bible quote, paused, and then realizing what he had read actually debunked the LDS doctrine he was espousing, so he hung his head and silently returned to his seat. Nope. Never happened. 

 

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@Bernard Gui

Quote

... I also heard a famous preacher tell a whopper of a lie about him during an anti-Mormon lecture in a Rockford IL Lutheran church about 1977. He said he once attended an LDS Conference where he heard the famous Mormon Apostle LeGrand Richards preach. Elder Richards read a Bible quote, paused, and then realizing what he had read actually debunked the LDS doctrine he was espousing, so he hung his head and silently returned to his seat. Nope. Never happened. 

That anyone who is even slightly acquainted with Elder Richards would believe that is, in a way, funnier  than the true red-button incident! ;) :D 

Edited by Kenngo1969
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9 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

@Bernard Gui

That anyone who is even slightly acquainted with Elder Richards would believe that is, in a way, funnier  than the true red-button incident! ;) :D 

I remember reading about a conference talk by an Elder Richards around 1932. He spoke rather plainly about his thoughts on the Word of Wisdom. His talk was deleted from all official records of the conference . . . it never happened! I wonder how many talks over the years have been stricken from the record or edited to remove something that a leader did not like?

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2 hours ago, Navidad said:

I remember reading about a conference talk by an Elder Richards around 1932. He spoke rather plainly about his thoughts on the Word of Wisdom. His talk was deleted from all official records of the conference . . . it never happened! I wonder how many talks over the years have been stricken from the record or edited to remove something that a leader did not like?

I would guess very few. Critics would be very quick to point it out.

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11 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

@Bernard Gui

That anyone who is even slightly acquainted with Elder Richards would believe that is, in a way, funnier  than the true red-button incident! ;) :D 

There were several Elder Richards vs the red light events. Elder David Haight mentioned an two earlier ones…

Quote

When Elder LeGrand Richards was getting along in years, he generally gave extemporaneous conference talks. As you know, we have some time restraints. There was concern as to how to notify him when his time was up. A little flashing light was put on the podium, and during one of his talks he said, “There’s a light here that keeps flashing.” The next conference they made the light red, but he just put his hand over it. So I might resort to some of that today. As we age, we get to the point where the teleprompter doesn’t work for us anymore; then the printers seem to be doing a poor job in printing the text; and then the ink doesn’t seem to be as good as it used to be, either! (October 1995)

Quote

It’s a joy to be here with you and to witness this great historic meeting facility. I enjoyed President Hinckley’s comments regarding the walnut from which this pulpit is made. The Tabernacle pulpit had both a red light and an amber light to assist the speaker with his time.
As we get older, our eyesight usually isn’t as sharp as it used to be. The amber light would come on, and if you didn’t pay attention to that, the red light would start to blink. Brother LeGrand Richards, when the light was first installed, said, “Someone’s put a silly light up here.” He said, “I’ll just put my hand over it.” There isn’t a light here today, so I don’t know when I will end. (April 2002)

I saw the one in the video above and the Elder Richards “silly light” talk that he was referring to in these talks..

 

Edited by Bernard Gui
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Not to take us too far afield (sorry, Navidad :huh:) but I remember when President Romney was giving an absolutely fabulous talk on Priesthood power ... I mean, it was really good.  But he couldn't read it off of the Teleprompter because his eyesight wasn't that good ... (Mine isn't either; allegedly, it's not good enough to drive anymore.  I told the last eye doctor I saw, "Ummmm ... okay.  In light of that, I have a question for you: How do you think I got here?"  What, do you think my vision sucks so bad that I couldn't tell which lane I was supposed to be in, and, like Moses parted the Red Sea, I ended up parting two lanes of oncoming traffic as motorists screamed, "Look ouuuuuuuuuuut!  We're all gonna diiiiiiiiiiieeeeeee!" ???? :unknw:)  But I'm typing this without glasses!  Go figure!)

Where was I?  Oh, yes.  President Romney's vision.  He was reading from a written text about Priesthood power, but the pages got jumbled up, so he stopped and shuffled through them for several seconds, finally looking up and saying sheepishly, "I don't have the power to find the pages!" :D  Classic!

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5 hours ago, Navidad said:

I remember reading about a conference talk by an Elder Richards around 1932. He spoke rather plainly about his thoughts on the Word of Wisdom. His talk was deleted from all official records of the conference . . . it never happened! I wonder how many talks over the years have been stricken from the record or edited to remove something that a leader did not like?

So, that was Stephen L Richards, not LeGrand Richards

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7 hours ago, Bernard Gui said:

I would guess very few. Critics would be very quick to point it out.

Hola. I wasn't pointing it out as a critic. I remember some years ago researching the origins of the WOW. I came across an article in a magazine recounting  Elder Richard's talk. It repeated the talk verbatim and then noted that it had been stricken from the conference record. I found the official record of that conference online and sure enough the talk was gone! Duncan is correct in pointing out it was Stephen L Richards. I will have to look him up and learn more about him. I apologize if bringing up his talk and its removal from the record was offensive. That was not my intent. Perhaps it was an anomaly.

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1 hour ago, Navidad said:

Hola. I wasn't pointing it out as a critic. I remember some years ago researching the origins of the WOW. I came across an article in a magazine recounting  Elder Richard's talk. It repeated the talk verbatim and then noted that it had been stricken from the conference record. I found the official record of that conference online and sure enough the talk was gone! Duncan is correct in pointing out it was Stephen L Richards. I will have to look him up and learn more about him. I apologize if bringing up his talk and its removal from the record was offensive. That was not my intent. Perhaps it was an anomaly.

No, no.  I can't speak for every Latter-day Saint in the world, obviously, and, though I doubt seriously that my friend, Don Bernardo, was offended, I will let him speak for himself.  That said, I think Don Bernardo simply was pointing out that if removing addresses from a Conference Report were a common occurrence, critics would be quick to seize upon it as a cudgel with which to beat the Church of Jesus Christ, he wasn't putting you in that category.  We Saints need all the friends we can get! ;)  :D :friends: 

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Before it was the MTC it was the LTM and those of us who went to the LTM at BYU first spent a week up in SCL during which we did a session at the SCL temple and were treated to a talk by an apostle, and in my case this was Legrand Richards. I don't remember much of the talk other than how much I enjoyed it, but I do remember at the end of it, Elder Richards remarked that he was often asked if the stories he told were true, to which he replied, "if they aren't they should be".

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8 hours ago, Navidad said:

Hola. I wasn't pointing it out as a critic. I remember some years ago researching the origins of the WOW. I came across an article in a magazine recounting  Elder Richard's talk. It repeated the talk verbatim and then noted that it had been stricken from the conference record. I found the official record of that conference online and sure enough the talk was gone! Duncan is correct in pointing out it was Stephen L Richards. I will have to look him up and learn more about him. I apologize if bringing up his talk and its removal from the record was offensive. That was not my intent. Perhaps it was an anomaly.

¡No se preocupe! I didn’t take offense. Deleting conference talks is very rare, but if it were to happen the critic mob would be all over it. You are not a part of that awful bunch. Not by a long shot! Please share whatever you find.

Edited by Bernard Gui
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