Jump to content

Poll re Crystals / Tarot Cards / Fortunetelling


Recommended Posts

Here:

Quote

A new survey released by Springtide Research Institute confirms what metaphysical store owners and veteran tarot readers have known since the term Gen Z was invented: Younger Americans, known for fashioning their own spirituality the way they curate their social media feeds, are doing so using well-established alternative practices.

“There is such little ownership over a religious belief system that you’re just told all the right answers to. These other spiritual ways have a more personal connection — those personal ‘aha’ moments,” Jesse Brodka, a 22-year-old Roman Catholic, told Springtide.

Springtide’s survey showed that 51% of its sample population, ages 13 to 25, engage in “tarot cards or fortunetelling.” Of that percentage, 17% practice daily, 25% once a week, 27% once a month and 31% less than once a month.

Wow.  I'm surprised at these numbers.

Quote

According to Springtide’s report, divination practices are most popular among young people who identify as Russian or Greek Orthodox (78.1%), Mormon (69.4%) or Jewish (62.1%). Atheists had the lowest interest in metaphysical-adjacent practices at 34.4%, followed closely by those identifying with no particular faith tradition.

The numbers shift when daily or weekly practitioners of tarot and other fortunetelling arts are separated out from those who only dabble. In these cases, Orthodox youths still rank at the top at 38.8%, followed closely by those identifying as Muslim (34.6%) or Mormon (37.7%).

The numbers of kids doing this stuff in the Church is pretty surprising to me.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

-Smac

Link to comment
22 minutes ago, carbon dioxide said:

They will get over it quickly.  These methods of fortune telling are about as accurate as just rolling dice.  Eventually they will grow out of it.

I dunno.  If I am reading the article right, 37.7 of those who identify as Latter-day Saint are "daily or weekly practitioners of tarot and other fortunetelling arts" (as compared to 69.4% who "only dabble").

Maybe I'm reading it wrong.

Thanks,

-Smac

Link to comment
34 minutes ago, smac97 said:

Here:

Wow.  I'm surprised at these numbers.

The numbers of kids doing this stuff in the Church is pretty surprising to me.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

-Smac

That number is very high, both for Mormons and non. I'm very skeptical.

But if anyone has an etsy store perhaps they should add these items :) 

Link to comment
10 minutes ago, HappyJackWagon said:

That number is very high, both for Mormons and non. I'm very skeptical.

But if anyone has an etsy store perhaps they should add these items :) 

I wonder if “tarot cards or fortunetelling” includes online stuff.  It sure seems odd to think that huge numbers of kids are playing around with actual tarot cards, crystals, whatever.

Thanks,

-Smac

Link to comment

I have a Tarot deck. I needed it as a visual aid for something.

I also know three ways of telling the future with regular playing cards. I learned two in Young Men’s (and the Young Women knew them too). I learned another on my mission and it was demonstrated to me using prophet cards.

No, we didn’t take it seriously. If that counts as divination I would have been a yes.

I remember I had one seminary teacher who was REALLY scared of ouija boards. Like convinced it auto-summoned demons scared.

Link to comment

Where is the poll?   Tarot cards are playing cards and some/many members of our Church do not approve of any games that uses or includes cards.  I don't think cards are bad, but I do not approve of gambling.  Playing with tarot cards isn't gambling.

Link to comment
36 minutes ago, The Nehor said:

I have a Tarot deck. I needed it as a visual aid for something.

I also know three ways of telling the future with regular playing cards. I learned two in Young Men’s (and the Young Women knew them too). I learned another on my mission and it was demonstrated to me using prophet cards.

No, we didn’t take it seriously. If that counts as divination I would have been a yes.

I remember I had one seminary teacher who was REALLY scared of ouija boards. Like convinced it auto-summoned demons scared.

Dead people will show up in many places whether summoned or invited or not.  Not all dead people are demons, only a small percentage, actually. And there are no such things as zombies, which I would not like if there were.  Ouija boards can be fun.

Link to comment
3 hours ago, smac97 said:

Here:

Wow.  I'm surprised at these numbers.

The numbers of kids doing this stuff in the Church is pretty surprising to me.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

-Smac

It’s easier. You don’t have to be living a certain way, you don’t have to practice, you don’t have to develop a personal relationship with Diety, you just flip over some cards. 

Link to comment
4 hours ago, smac97 said:

The numbers of kids doing this stuff in the Church is pretty surprising to me.

I'm pretty plugged in with youth in our ward, and this is most definitely not a thing.

If I had to guess, the survey likely defines "divination" in a very broad way - such that it would encompass silly things like that MASH game they used to play back when I was a kid (in the olden days).

Modern-day equivalents would be something like those online surveys where you answer a bunch of random questions (e.g., if you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?) and then it tells you how many kids you are going to have.

If that counts as "fortunetelling" then yeah, I guess our kids are doomed. But probably more because they are developing time-wasting habits and not because they are abandoning their faith.

 

Link to comment
5 hours ago, smac97 said:

Here:

Wow.  I'm surprised at these numbers.

The numbers of kids doing this stuff in the Church is pretty surprising to me.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

-Smac

3 cheers for undeveloped frontal lobes!

Link to comment
3 hours ago, bluebell said:

It’s easier. You don’t have to be living a certain way, you don’t have to practice, you don’t have to develop a personal relationship with Diety, you just flip over some cards. 

Do you know how hard it is to channel the forces of prophecy? After all if it doesn’t work then how did the witch at Endor call up Samuel? And how did Saul avoid the cannibalistic Ewoks on the way?

Characterized+sparrow_a2e27d_8402827.jpg

Link to comment

Call me skeptical, but those numbers are suspect. The only possible way I can see it reaching that high is if they’re including checking the horoscope in the restaurant newspaper as a “divination practice.”

Link to comment
Quote

Springtide works with partners to develop a random sampling adjusted to reflect national demographics and relies on comprehensive “quality” answers, not simply “bots,” explained Kevin Singer, head of media and public relations for the research group.

I would like to see the questions and answers and the sampling process. 
 

Quote

Springtide Research Institute was founded in 2019, rooted in the 300-year Lasallian heritage of being fiercely devoted to young people, and to provide for the human and spiritual needs of the young, especially the poor and marginalized.

As the only sociological research institute in the United States solely dedicated to young people ages 13-25, Springtide gives voice to the emerging perceptions, beliefs and practices of young people at the intersections of their human and religious experiences. We pay attention to, deeply understand, then illuminate the shifting social and religious landscape in which the youngest generations are forming identity, shaping social connection, and making meaning in their lives.

We are social scientists with a heart for young people. Our singular concern: the flourishing of all young people regardless of creed or identity. And, we have a singular aim: to help those who care about young people, care better.   

OUR FUNDING

We receive funding through multiple channels. We sell research reports, offer services including expert keynotes, consulting and custom research for mission-driven organizations, and raise money through generous individuals and foundations.

https://www.springtideresearch.org/about-us

I am not seeing anything that says how the surveys were collected. And to claim to be THE authority on the subject of youth on 2 years of existence is a claim that makes me doubt their credibility. 
 

Of the 12 on the Research Advisory Board, only two appear to have a background in statistical research.  The others appear to be religious and community leaders and activists. 
 

Their team comes across as light on researchers if that is their main focus (sounds like it is more designing programs for religious and community leaders), Head of Research, Associate, Fellow, and two interns. 
 

They come across with a more alternative faith vibe, so that could influence how they write up their surveys and do their interviews. 
 

You may be able to get access to the research itself by signing up, but I get enough spam, I only sign up for stuff I am using consistently. 

Edited by Calm
Link to comment

So I tried to download for free, but it only took me to a page of links and when I clicked on the one link about the study itself, it took me to buy it for 20$. No thanks. 
 

Lots of graphics, low on info. Can’t find anything of substance until this recent press release except a promo on their fundraising advisory site. 

Link to comment

I remember reading this some where.  The article said it did happen.   A man who was sure that he was cursed went to a fortune teller to find help with the curse.  The fortune teller was a woman who was making spare money as a student enrolled in medicine.  She was sure she was doing the right thing when she broke cover to tell him of her studies and said he had very serious symptoms and should see a doctor quickly.   The man became enraged and wanted his money back.  So we see that much of fortune telling is about meeting some expectations.    

Link to comment
On 8/13/2021 at 4:41 PM, The Nehor said:

I remember I had one seminary teacher who was REALLY scared of ouija boards. Like convinced it auto-summoned demons scared.

I had several friends in college who were into the occult (all non-LDS, some Wiccans, if it matters) to greater or lesser extents. Some of them did tarot and runes and other methods of divinations.  None of them would do ouija boards.  They had all had experiences that led to the conviction that they were bad news.

 

Link to comment
On 8/13/2021 at 4:42 PM, smac97 said:

Here:

Wow.  I'm surprised at these numbers.

The numbers of kids doing this stuff in the Church is pretty surprising to me.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

-Smac

I don’t scoff. My niece and nephew (as teens) had a very unfortunate experience playing with a ouija board. Scared the heck out of them. They never did it again. I have been in several situations where a dark and evil presence was manifested. Just the opposite of the Holy Spirit. Very disconcerting.

Edited by Bernard Gui
Link to comment
On 8/13/2021 at 11:15 PM, The Nehor said:

Do you know how hard it is to channel the forces of prophecy? After all if it doesn’t work then how did the witch at Endor call up Samuel? And how did Saul avoid the cannibalistic Ewoks on the way?

Characterized+sparrow_a2e27d_8402827.jpg

Ewok tailors have skills.

Link to comment
On 8/15/2021 at 1:55 PM, The Nehor said:

5e3c7deab0236.jpeg

Had a ouija board a while ago, never worked.  Tarot cards were fun.  In the end I grew up and discovered Hermeticism and esoteric things, actually going in that direction quite heavily nowadays. 

 

Link to comment
8 minutes ago, poptart said:

Had a ouija board a while ago, never worked.  Tarot cards were fun.  In the end I grew up and discovered Hermeticism and esoteric things, actually going in that direction quite heavily nowadays. 

To make a Ouija board more fun it helps to invite a ghost to come play with you.   Can you guess which of the 3 people shown below hasn't died, yet?  When playing you may not be able to see everyone who is playing with you.

Ouija: Origin of Evil review – prequel keeps spirits high with schlocky  scares | Horror films | The Guardian

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...