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Plant this word in your hearts


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I had a question on this section of the manual

237 - Here’s another way to study Alma 32–34: Draw pictures representing different 
phases of a seed’s growth. Then label each picture with words from Alma 32:28–43 that
help you understand how to plant and nourish the word in your heart.

Alma 32:28 says "Now, we will compare the word unto a seed. Now, if ye give place, 
that a seed may be planted in your heart, behold, if it be a true seed, or a good 
seed, if ye do not cast it out by your unbelief, that ye will resist the Spirit of 
the Lord, behold, it will begin to swell within your breasts; and when you feel 
these swelling motions, ye will begin to say within yourselves—It must needs be that 
this is a good seed, or that the word is good, for it beginneth to enlarge my soul; 
yea, it beginneth to enlighten my understanding, yea, it beginneth to be delicious 
to me".

This question is directed to those who were formerly members of another religion but
have converted to the LDS faith.

Do you find that your previous false religion kept you bound because its incorrect
doctrine and teachings produced "good feelings" in you since you believed them to
be true but you now realize they were actually false?

I converted from Shintoism so I could say that those previous false teachings made
me feel good but I came to realize that Jesus is who he and his followers taught 
him to be.

Pete

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2 hours ago, TheTanakas said:

I had a question on this section of the manual

237 - Here’s another way to study Alma 32–34: Draw pictures representing different 
phases of a seed’s growth. Then label each picture with words from Alma 32:28–43 that
help you understand how to plant and nourish the word in your heart.

Alma 32:28 says "Now, we will compare the word unto a seed. Now, if ye give place, 
that a seed may be planted in your heart, behold, if it be a true seed, or a good 
seed, if ye do not cast it out by your unbelief, that ye will resist the Spirit of 
the Lord, behold, it will begin to swell within your breasts; and when you feel 
these swelling motions, ye will begin to say within yourselves—It must needs be that 
this is a good seed, or that the word is good, for it beginneth to enlarge my soul; 
yea, it beginneth to enlighten my understanding, yea, it beginneth to be delicious 
to me".

This question is directed to those who were formerly members of another religion but
have converted to the LDS faith.

Do you find that your previous false religion kept you bound because its incorrect
doctrine and teachings produced "good feelings" in you since you believed them to
be true but you now realize they were actually false?

I converted from Shintoism so I could say that those previous false teachings made
me feel good but I came to realize that Jesus is who he and his followers taught 
him to be.

Pete

I think there is further distance between the doctrine and teachings of Shintoism and those of Christianity; less distance between the doctrine and teachings within the denominations of Christianity. What Christian denomination do you belong to? What differences to you see between your denomination's doctrine and teachings that produce "good feelings" for you and those of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

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5 hours ago, TheTanakas said:

I had a question on this section of the manual

237 - Here’s another way to study Alma 32–34: Draw pictures representing different 
phases of a seed’s growth. Then label each picture with words from Alma 32:28–43 that
help you understand how to plant and nourish the word in your heart.

Alma 32:28 says "Now, we will compare the word unto a seed. Now, if ye give place, 
that a seed may be planted in your heart, behold, if it be a true seed, or a good 
seed, if ye do not cast it out by your unbelief, that ye will resist the Spirit of 
the Lord, behold, it will begin to swell within your breasts; and when you feel 
these swelling motions, ye will begin to say within yourselves—It must needs be that 
this is a good seed, or that the word is good, for it beginneth to enlarge my soul; 
yea, it beginneth to enlighten my understanding, yea, it beginneth to be delicious 
to me".

This question is directed to those who were formerly members of another religion but
have converted to the LDS faith.

Do you find that your previous false religion kept you bound because its incorrect
doctrine and teachings produced "good feelings" in you since you believed them to
be true but you now realize they were actually false?

I converted from Shintoism so I could say that those previous false teachings made
me feel good but I came to realize that Jesus is who he and his followers taught 
him to be.

Pete

I think you are possibly misconstruing Alma 32:28 to be about "good feelings", when the verse indicates that the true fruit of the seed is that it begins to enlarge the soul and enlighten the mind and understanding.  There is a metaphor there of the "swelling motions" of the growth of a seed and it being "delicious" to us.  We don't literally eat seeds that taste good and have them grow within us, but this is a comparison, where the word will bear the fruit of enlightenment, understanding, and growth rather than having the restrictions that may come with being circumscribed by false teachings.  

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On 7/18/2021 at 7:02 PM, CV75 said:

I think there is further distance between the doctrine and teachings of Shintoism and those of Christianity; less distance between the doctrine and teachings within the denominations of Christianity. What Christian denomination do you belong to? What differences to you see between your denomination's doctrine and teachings that produce "good feelings" for you and those of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

My denomination?  I converted from Shintoism to the LDS Church; the main sect.

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On 7/18/2021 at 5:02 PM, CV75 said:

I think there is further distance between the doctrine and teachings of Shintoism and those of Christianity; less distance between the doctrine and teachings within the denominations of Christianity. What Christian denomination do you belong to? What differences to you see between your denomination's doctrine and teachings that produce "good feelings" for you and those of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

Are you Japanese?  I have to ask, one really doesnt convert to Shinto per say, it's more of a philosophy/life style than a religion like Christianity is.   I'm not Japanese, have some ancestry and exposure growing up.  From my experience those who marry Japanese/japanese Americans, do a lot of Japanese martial arts, etc will associate to a degree mostly because it's so pervasive, just like Taoism for the Chinese.  That and if you live in the west coast esp. Hawaii they're far more active than say, the Midwest.  A lot of Japanese homes, dojo etc usually have a kamidana.  Ever hear of Marie kondo?  Very shinto in her lifestyle.

I've met one of the few (maybe only?) Guji in the US, maybe the world.  He runs tsubaki jinja in Washington State, cool guy he has Aikido camps from time to time as well as Matsuri through the year.  Even I have a kamidana but am I Shinto?  Uhh, not really.  Not trying to give you a hard time but a thread like this, I had to ask.

Edited by poptart
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13 minutes ago, Calm said:

Why would he be the only chief Shinto shrine priest in the world?  There are many Shinto shrines.  Do you mean outside Japan?

In the US:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Shinto_shrines_in_the_United_States

Outside of Japan, that and I may have totally messed the title up.  Considering i used to visit this place a few times a year I should. Know better, shame on me.  When I say one of the few maybe only, I mean hakujin (Caucasian)  his wife is Japanese though.

https://www.worldreligionnews.com/religion-news/first-non-japanese-shinto-priest-rev-koichi-barrish-discusses-his-faith

http://www.tsubakishrine.org/

Believe it's the sisters shrine for tsubaki jinja in Japan.  When I'd go it was usually for new years and whenever I could make it in the summer.  I still buy omamori from them.

Edit: think the title is kannushi or shinshoku, depending on his rank/grade and responsibility.  Japan has rank grades for almost everything due to the Confucian and samurai influence.

Edited by poptart
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1 hour ago, TheTanakas said:

My denomination?  I converted from Shintoism to the LDS Church; the main sect.

I converted to the same Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints without having much religious involvement with any denomination, though if asked i would probably identify as Protestant Christian. I think the driver for my interest in the Church was the teaching that it is the Restored Church with Christ at the head directing modern prophets and apostles. The things I had "good feelings" about before that hadn't changed, really (peacemaking, friendship, helping someone in trouble, etc. -- and I was raised in NYC LOL!).

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1 hour ago, poptart said:

Are you Japanese?  I have to ask, one really doesnt convert to Shinto per say, it's more of a philosophy/life style than a religion like Christianity is.   I'm not Japanese, have some ancestry and exposure growing up.  From my experience those who marry Japanese/japanese Americans, do a lot of Japanese martial arts, etc will associate to a degree mostly because it's so pervasive, just like Taoism for the Chinese.  That and if you live in the west coast esp. Hawaii they're far more active than say, the Midwest.  A lot of Japanese homes, dojo etc usually have a kamidana.  Ever hear of Marie kondo?  Very shinto in her lifestyle.

I've met one of the few (maybe only?) Guji in the US, maybe the world.  He runs tsubaki jinja in Washington State, cool guy he has Aikido camps from time to time as well as Matsuri through the year.  Even I have a kamidana but am I Shinto?  Uhh, not really.  Not trying to give you a hard time but a thread like this, I had to ask.

I do have a number Asian (various nationalities) influences in my life, all very much Americanized, but some cultural preferences have carried through. My incorrect assumption was that @TheTanakas is a member of a (non-LDS) Christian denomination.

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On 7/18/2021 at 7:27 PM, InCognitus said:

I think you are possibly misconstruing Alma 32:28 to be about "good feelings", when the verse indicates that the true fruit of the seed is that it begins to enlarge the soul and enlighten the mind and understanding.  There is a metaphor there of the "swelling motions" of the growth of a seed and it being "delicious" to us.  We don't literally eat seeds that taste good and have them grow within us, but this is a comparison, where the word will bear the fruit of enlightenment, understanding, and growth rather than having the restrictions that may come with being circumscribed by false teachings.  

I like the point you are making, but I think good feelings have a lot to do with discerning truth too.  Truth is delicious to me because it has real substance in my mind and heart, rather than an empty feeling when I am only speculating and not sure if I am on the right path.  And I do tend to speculate often as I try to figure things out in my mind, even while I am praying to God while asking him to help me know what the truth is.  And it is not until I have faith that I begin to know what the truth is, precept to precept.

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33 minutes ago, CV75 said:

I do have a number Asian (various nationalities) influences in my life, all very much Americanized, but some cultural preferences have carried through. My incorrect assumption was that @TheTanakas is a member of a (non-LDS) Christian denomination.

Ops, I'm a space cadet today, that was for @thetanakas.   Yay phone posting. 

My bad.  That being said, it's interesting, if you grew up in the West Coast at all it seems like there's always some Asian cultural influence of some sort. Just an observation.

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50 minutes ago, poptart said:

Ops, I'm a space cadet today, that was for @thetanakas.   Yay phone posting. 

My bad.  That being said, it's interesting, if you grew up in the West Coast at all it seems like there's always some Asian cultural influence of some sort. Just an observation.

I grew up in NYC, on Lower East Side Manhattan and so visiting Chinatown was a regular outing -- we could easily walk or take a bus if lazy. My mother-in-law was born and raised in Hawaii (her mother had immigrated from the Philippines), and picked up a lot of other Asian influences from there that has been passed down even to our children. Her generation was really trying to assimilate into American society, but at least the food has carried through!!! Plus taking our shoes off at the door :) and a few other odds and ends.

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20 hours ago, CV75 said:

I grew up in NYC, on Lower East Side Manhattan and so visiting Chinatown was a regular outing -- we could easily walk or take a bus if lazy. My mother-in-law was born and raised in Hawaii (her mother had immigrated from the Philippines), and picked up a lot of other Asian influences from there that has been passed down even to our children. Her generation was really trying to assimilate into American society, but at least the food has carried through!!! Plus taking our shoes off at the door :) and a few other odds and ends.

If your mother in law grew up in Hawaii then yeah you might have an idea where I'm coming from.  Not sure how many jinja they have total, they have a few.  The sect of Buddhism I belong to has a temple on almost every island I think.  Mom isn't a member but did go to byuh.  Everything is different there even the Mormons, in a good way.  I take my shoes off at the door too, makes me sick when I see how unhygienic some people are.  Different people different culture.

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9 minutes ago, poptart said:

If your mother in law grew up in Hawaii then yeah you might have an idea where I'm coming from.  Not sure how many jinja they have total, they have a few.  The sect of Buddhism I belong to has a temple on almost every island I think.  Mom isn't a member but did go to byuh.  Everything is different there even the Mormons, in a good way.  I take my shoes off at the door too, makes me sick when I see how unhygienic some people are.  Different people different culture.

We have a pagoda in our garden our back yard, but only because it looks nice. A few neighbors have asked about it :)

 

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7 hours ago, CV75 said:

We have a pagoda in our garden our back yard, but only because it looks nice. A few neighbors have asked about it :)

 

 

6 hours ago, poptart said:

All you need is a Buddha.  

Will this do?

image.png.0427f5719ba9fb3769bc0d17f707724d.png

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On 7/18/2021 at 2:22 PM, TheTanakas said:

Do you find that your previous false religion kept you bound because its incorrect
doctrine and teachings produced "good feelings" in you since you believed them to
be true but you now realize they were actually false?

I have been a member and pastor of a non-denominational Evangelical church, a member and on the pastoral staff of several different Baptist churches and the Mennonite church. I was happy in each. I don't believe that any of them were a "false religion." In the same way I do not believe the LDS church, the Catholic church, Pentecostals or any other Christian group that honors the atonement, the plan of salvation, or the core essence of the gospel is "false." We are also in our fourth year of faithful attendance in an LDS ward. Perhaps Shintoism is an incomplete religion; perhaps it is false. I am not sure.

Each Christian group I have mentioned comes with its own "appendages" to use Joseph Smith's word, but inaccurate or false appendages don't make the faith or the gospel it preaches false (IMHO). As to "good feelings," I am not sure about that term. I don't think positive or good feelings validate any faith system, especially the truth of the same.

If I were asked (and I have been) to compare the faiths I have been involved with, I would suggest that I sense no more or less "good feelings" in any of the folks in any of them. I would expand that to include that I see no more or less human or personal righteousness, holiness, kindness, or goodwill in any of these groups (certainly individuals differ widely both within and between the groups). For the most part I can just as easily worship and fellowship in a ward full of LDS Christians as I could if next week I went home and worshiped in my home church in Pennsylvania which is non-denominational.

Edited by Navidad
clarification
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On 7/18/2021 at 1:22 PM, TheTanakas said:

I had a question on this section of the manual

237 - Here’s another way to study Alma 32–34: Draw pictures representing different 
phases of a seed’s growth. Then label each picture with words from Alma 32:28–43 that
help you understand how to plant and nourish the word in your heart.

Alma 32:28 says "Now, we will compare the word unto a seed. Now, if ye give place, 
that a seed may be planted in your heart, behold, if it be a true seed, or a good 
seed, if ye do not cast it out by your unbelief, that ye will resist the Spirit of 
the Lord, behold, it will begin to swell within your breasts; and when you feel 
these swelling motions, ye will begin to say within yourselves—It must needs be that 
this is a good seed, or that the word is good, for it beginneth to enlarge my soul; 
yea, it beginneth to enlighten my understanding, yea, it beginneth to be delicious 
to me".

This question is directed to those who were formerly members of another religion but
have converted to the LDS faith.

Do you find that your previous false religion kept you bound because its incorrect
doctrine and teachings produced "good feelings" in you since you believed them to
be true but you now realize they were actually false?

I converted from Shintoism so I could say that those previous false teachings made
me feel good but I came to realize that Jesus is who he and his followers taught 
him to be.

Pete

I am not sure why it is so difficult  for some to realize that eternal truths can be found in all religions.

It's not as simple as "true" or "false".

In 2000 years philosophers have not been able to define those words- but your heart can define them instantly.  We all know what is "delicious" to all humanity.

Shintoism is not "false" because the CoJCLDS is "true".   All religions have truths within their ways of seeing and feeling. When I am in a forest, alone and quiet and reverent, I can feel the "spirit" of every stone and tree.  The earth itself is alive and a spiritual being.

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On 7/20/2021 at 4:35 PM, CV75 said:

I grew up in NYC, on Lower East Side Manhattan and so visiting Chinatown was a regular outing

I am flipping out! 

For three years during grad school- (no I did not go to NYU) I lived on Washington Sq W and walked down Waverly Pl to the Astor Place train station to go to my job on Lex and 92nd - at the 92nd Street YMHA- Young Men's Hebrew Association- for those who have never heard of such a thing.  Exactly like the YMCA, but a lot more yarmulkes! ;)

Even got mugged once on Astor Place- the ultimate New York experience. 8P

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15 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

I am flipping out! 

For three years during grad school- (no I did not go to NYU) I lived on Washington Sq W and walked down Waverly Pl to the Astor Place train station to go to my job on Lex and 92nd - at the 92nd Street YMHA- Young Men's Hebrew Association- for those who have never heard of such a thing.  Exactly like the YMCA, but a lot more yarmulkes! ;)

Even got mugged once on Astor Place- the ultimate New York experience. 8P

Ha-ha, "East Meets West" -- you were near the West Village we were just 5 or blocks away from the East Village :) (I went to PS 61 on 12th and Avenue C).

"How do you get to Carnegie Hall?" -- "Practice!" //  "How do you get to Carnegie Hill?" -- "By bus!"

Never got mugged, but was on a stalled subway car when someone majorly freaked out when the lights went out. The last thing I saw was a movie poster for "That Darn Cat!" Funny the things we remember.

 

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On 7/21/2021 at 10:32 PM, Kenngo1969 said:

 

Will this do?

image.png.0427f5719ba9fb3769bc0d17f707724d.png

Was thinking more this, I'm partial to the one you posted TBH.  The Japanese Buddhas are so austere looking, geez if I'm going for an Asian garden I want someplace where I can enjoy myself.  Bonus points for the blingy gold color and coins.

H743a1fed83e04514a9cbb478446415281.jpg_.

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