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Constantine and the nt canon


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This video annihilates the rumor that the Council of Nicea determined the NT text. However, it deals with the forever Arian heresy that Jesus is some lesser deity type of creation of God. Great information on what is not Christian doctrine. 

 

Edited by Damien the Leper
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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Damien the Leper said:

This video annihilates the rumor that the Council of Nicea determined the NT text.

"Annihilates" is a strong word. 

The guy pretty much admits, in fact he said it twice to emphasize, "I am willing to admit...I am willing to admit that this might be a possibility (speaking of the canon being decided at the Council of Nicea)."

His evidence seems too weak to outright conclude that it is a myth.  The guy contradicts himself left and right.  On one hand he admits that it might have happened at Nicea, but on the other he demands "it didn't happen".  On one hand he states "The formation of the canon was an organic process, and no single council officially decided what should go in the Bible".  On the other hand he suggests that the Council of Laodicea published an official list of canonical books.  This council happened 30 years after Nicea.  In doing some reading, at Laodicea they decreed that only canonical books should be read in church (as if this canon was already pre-determined). 

Jerome stated, in regards to the Book of Judith, "but because this book was found by the Nicene Council to have been counted among the number of the sacred scriptures..."  In other words, there was some discussion about what should be counted among the sacred scriptures.   Interesting that only 30 years later the church forbade the reading of non-canonical books in church.  It seems reasonable that the canon was decided at Nicea, then 30 years later, after many people continued to read non-canonical passages in church, the church forbade the reading of non-canonical scripture at church in the Council of Laodicea. 

Either way, whether it was at Nicea or Laodicea (30 years later), the church clearly had council and decided what should officially be included in the new testament and forbade the reading of other non-canonical books. 

I am honestly confused as to why he suggests that no council officially decided what should go in the Bible, when he admits that the council of Laodicea published a list of officially sanctioned canonical books, and that all other books should not be read in church.

Edited by pogi
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4 hours ago, Damien the Leper said:

I posted this because I remember the nonsense being taught in Sunday school back in the day. Good to know it's all lies and misinformation. 

How can you say they were "lies"?  Perhaps they were teaching what they believed to be the best historical evidence?  Accusing the church of lying seems a bit harsh.  I can see good arguments to be made. This guy doesn't have me convinced in the least. 

Edited by pogi
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15 hours ago, Damien the Leper said:

This video annihilates the rumor that the Council of Nicea determined the NT text. However, it deals with the forever Arian heresy that Jesus is some lesser deity type of creation of God. Great information on what is not Christian doctrine. 

I've heard people say that the Council of Nicea determined the NT text, but not by any member of the LDS church that I can recall.  In fact, I have no idea why such an idea (true or not) would have any significance to a member of the church, or anyone else for that matter. 

A juicier detail about the first Nicene council (in my opinion) is that Constantine is the one who suggested that the controversial word homoousios be included in the creed (according to the letter of Eusebius Pamphilus to the Church of Cesarea).  At least that tidbit has some historical backing.

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15 hours ago, Damien the Leper said:

This video annihilates the rumor that the Council of Nicea determined the NT text. However, it deals with the forever Arian heresy that Jesus is some lesser deity type of creation of God. Great information on what is not Christian doctrine. 

 

Hey Damien...

What harm is there if the Council of Nicea WAS determining the Scriptural canon? (It wasn't on the menu).

I have never heard of anyone that is Catholic making an official definition on the Canon before the 16th Century (Trent). Unofficially at Cartgage long after our good emperor was gone.

I think this is big for non-Catholics because they have this idea that the Scripture alone is adequate to resolve doctrinal controversy. It was back burner for Catholics for most of the life of the Church.

We don't rely on Jn. 6 for our doctrine on the Eucharist, except that it is compatible with Apostolic Tradition. The Protestors come along, and okay let's settle this. But nobody cared much for over 15 centuries of Christianity.

I don't care what the Church teaches. My care is to believe what the Church teaches, even if Constantine agreed!

It is enough to believe whatever the Church teaches in every era, knowing that in the future, the Church might teach something contrary to what we currently tend to believe by our own lights. 

The canon is settled at Trent. Constantine as standardizing the canon? I have not heard that one!

Is Francis a pope? How should I know? I'll wait for the Church to say. Whatever the Church teaches. The canon took a while. A definition on that question about Francis might take a while too. Many Saints have gained heaven in ignorance of this teaching or that because the Church had not yet spoken. We don't need to know everything to be saved. We need to submit, and believe if and when the Church makes boundaries.

God bless,

Rory

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/9/2021 at 5:54 AM, Damien the Leper said:

This video annihilates the rumor that the Council of Nicea determined the NT text. However, it deals with the forever Arian heresy that Jesus is some lesser deity type of creation of God. Great information on what is not Christian doctrine. 

 

Wild speculations and baseless inferences.

The first clear reference to a catalog of scriptures accepted in antiquity by the early church fathers that later became the New Testament writings is found in the so-called Muratorian Canon, a rather unsophisticated Latin 8th-century manuscript translated from a Greek list written in Rome c. 170–180, named for its discoverer and publisher Lodovica Antonio Muratori (1672–1750). The first few lines are lost, Luke is referred to as “the third book of the Gospel,” and the canon thus contains [Matthew, Mark] Luke, John, Acts, 13 Pauline letters, Jude, two letters of John, and Revelation. 

By the 4th century, Athanasius, bishop of Alexandria and a significant theologian, delimited the canon and settled the strife between East and West. Both, Revelation and Hebrews (as part of the Pauline writings) were accepted. TOnly the 27 books of the New Testament were declared canonical and not others. In the Greek churches there was still controversy about Revelation, but in the Latin Church, under the influence of Jerome, Athanasius’ decision was accepted

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