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19th century anancronism in the book of mormon


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On 6/7/2021 at 5:02 PM, Brant Gardner said:

I have it on pretty good authority that he is skeptical of Hebraisms that are not involved with names. Names appear to follow a different logic in the translation--or so I think he thinks.

Fair enough, I'll take my lumps on that one. You seem decently well-informed when it comes to the thoughts and theories of Brant Gardner. 

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, ksfisher said:

Was Emma referring to Joseph's ability at the time of the translation of the Book of Mormon or throughout his life?  I would assume that Joseph's ability improved over time.

Of course his ability improved over time, but he was still dictating letters at the time of the translation as well, and we have examples of him writing not much later.

Whether or not Joseph is thought to be capable of creating/dictating the BofM narrative himself, the notion that he was some illiterate farm boy is incredibly far from the truth, and that notion really ought to be abandoned.

Edited by the narrator
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17 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Be that as it may, you’ve quite missed the point. I’m not quoting Emma, I’m quoting President Nelson. And I’m doing it to rebut what 2BizE implied or seemed to imply: that President Nelson doesn’t believe the Book of Mormon is an authentic narrative. 

I didn't miss any point at all. I was very well aware of the point you were making, which is part of a debate I care nothing about (that is, what Nelson thinks of the historicity of the BofM).

I was making a different point--that apologists, including Nelson, should stop appealing to this interview of Emma.

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13 minutes ago, the narrator said:

Of course his ability improved over time, but he was still dictating letters at the time of the translation as well, and we have examples of him writing not much later.

Whether or not Joseph is thought to be capable of creating/dictating the BofM narrative himself, the notion that he was some illiterate farm boy is incredibly far from the truth, and that notion really ought to be abandoned.

It's a way to veer away from anyone thinking JS could be the narrator. 

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13 minutes ago, the narrator said:

I didn't miss any point at all. I was very well aware of the point you were making, which is part of a debate I care nothing about (that is, what Nelson thinks of the historicity of the BofM).

I was making a different point--that apologists, including Nelson, should stop appealing to this interview of Emma.

If you want to do that, you are free to start your own thread for it. You don’t need to key off a post I made with an irrelevancy. 

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2 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

If you want to do that, you are free to start your own thread for it. You don’t need to key off a post I made with an irrelevancy. 

Lolz. Because a hallmark of this board is that everyone keeps threads on the OP topic, right?

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, the narrator said:

Of course his ability improved over time, but he was still dictating letters at the time of the translation as well, and we have examples of him writing not much later.

Whether or not Joseph is thought to be capable of creating/dictating the BofM narrative himself, the notion that he was some illiterate farm boy is incredibly far from the truth, and that notion really ought to be abandoned.

Emma might have been a snob. 
 

Got to admit my husband’s handwriting and spelling has led me on occasion to make some derogatory remarks about them.  But he is brilliant in other ways and has expressed admiration for me for being better than in academics and a few other things and laughs about his weaknesses in this area...we are both very grateful for computers (though it has made me lazy).  He asked me to type a paper for him even before we got married.  His mom was eager to turn that chore over to me.  The Macintosh probably saved our marriage. 
 

Oops...looks like this is an unauthorized derail, will delete if asked. No one need respond. 

Edited by Calm
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10 hours ago, the narrator said:

Of course his ability improved over time, but he was still dictating letters at the time of the translation as well, and we have examples of him writing not much later.

Whether or not Joseph is thought to be capable of creating/dictating the BofM narrative himself, the notion that he was some illiterate farm boy is incredibly far from the truth, and that notion really ought to be abandoned.

As my good friend Gordon Thomasson has noted, during Joseph's lifetime the word "illiterate" would be better understood as "unlettered," or without formal education. Of course he could read and write.

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