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Received a deseret book catalogue - it turns me off


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13 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

 

Yes.  They may be donating all the proceeds to charity.  I have LDS scholar friends who have done that with their books - never making a profit.

Yeah, I've made that point previously.

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Temple garments are absurdly low priced, especially given the unparalleled quality of the work. Considering the good intent that makes that possible, I can deduce the spiritual factors that drive it. From every angle I get positive confirmation.

I suspect I wouldn't receive similar confirmation from the Deseret catalog.

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23 hours ago, The Nehor said:

Dear Sir or Madam, will you read this book?
It took a year to translate, please take a look
It's based on a novel by this Spaulding guy
And I need the sale
Cause I wanna be a paperback writer
Paperback writer

I always count on The Nehor for the best cultural references on this board, and he never disappoints ... Beatles!

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9 minutes ago, HappyJackWagon said:

Aren't you overstating this a touch.  :) 

"Unparalleled quality of work"- really? As compared to what? It sounds like you're trying too hard to convince someone.

Sounds like you don't wear one-piece . . . :) Then, you would know . . . ;) 

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5 hours ago, Chum said:

Temple garments are absurdly low priced, especially given the unparalleled quality of the work. Considering the good intent that makes that possible, I can deduce the spiritual factors that drive it. From every angle I get positive confirmation.

I suspect I wouldn't receive similar confirmation from the Deseret catalog.

The DB I go to in Orem has a Distribution Center in the back -- a spiritual factor.

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14 hours ago, MustardSeed said:

Are you suggesting that I don’t seek other sources? And must those sources have a price tag? That doesn’t make sense to me. 

No of course not.  The people who spend their lives writing books should not be rewarded and live in government homeless camps.

You speak of the evils of alienated labor, and then suggest that it's ok for authors be robbed of the fruits of THEIR labor.

Trust me, I know my Marx, Engels, Trotsky, Lenin, and the boys when I see it.

I used to be among the Faithful Belivers, who reputed religion so they could make their own and make it THEIR monopoly.

Their taxes make tithing like like child's play.

"Everything for FREE"

Uh huh

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by mfbukowski
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32 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

No of course not.  The people who spend their lives writing books should not be rewarded and live in government homeless camps.

You speak of the evils of alienated labor, and then suggest that it's ok for authors be robbed of the fruits of THEIR labor.

Trust me, I know my Marx, Engels, Trotsky, Lenin, and the boys when I see it.

I used to be among the Faithful Belivers, who reputed religion so they could make their own and make it THEIR monopoly.

Their taxes make tithing like like child's play.

"Everything for FREE"

Uh huh

 

 

 

 

 

We are talking about two completely different things. I wouldn't describe myself as entitled in the least.  If I give that impression, I am misrepresenting myself.

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8 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

The DB I go to in Orem has a Distribution Center in the back -- a spiritual factor.

Some years ago, the Church closed its Distribution Center satellite stores and set up sections inside Deseret Book stores for dispensing the DC supplies. I think it was a prudent move. Win-win-win. Savings on overhead costs for the Church, greater convenience for Church members, and a symbiotic benefit for the DB retail outlets. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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54 minutes ago, MustardSeed said:

We are talking about two completely different things. I wouldn't describe myself as entitled in the least.  If I give that impression, I am misrepresenting myself.

Entitled?  Where does that word even appear?

Nevermind.  

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7 hours ago, Chum said:

Temple garments are absurdly low priced, especially given the unparalleled quality of the work.

Whaddaya mean?   They wear out in a mere 15 years or so!  ;)

 

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2 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

Entitled?  Where does that word even appear?

Nevermind.  

Pardon, I have no idea where I got that from - I have confused you AND myself. 😕

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On 4/8/2021 at 5:19 AM, Bob Crockett said:

That's funny.  Although I think it is Deseret's Book. 

How long have you been a Church member? 

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5 hours ago, Bob Crockett said:

For awhile I thought it was Deseree Books.

 

That’s a non-responsive reply. 
 

I can understand a fairly recent convert to the Church thinking incorrectly that the proper name is “Deseret Books,” but with one who was born and raised in the Church, as I was, and with whom the name Deseret Book is likely ingrained in his cultural DNA, I don’t get it. 

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14 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:

That’s a non-responsive reply. 
 

I can understand a fairly recent convert to the Church thinking incorrectly that the proper name is “Deseret Books,” but with one who was born and raised in the Church, as I was, and with whom the name Deseret Book is likely ingrained in his cultural DNA, I don’t get it. 

There seems to be a tendency for people to add S's to things, though --- it seems to be hard-wired, linguistically. How many times have you heard people refer to it as Pathways  (Pathway)? This happens to a lot of things. A junior high I taught at years ago (Desert Wind) was constantly referred to as "Desert Winds for some reason. 

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20 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:

That’s a non-responsive reply. 
 

I can understand a fairly recent convert to the Church thinking incorrectly that the proper name is “Deseret Books,” but with one who was born and raised in the Church, as I was, and with whom the name Deseret Book is likely ingrained in his cultural DNA, I don’t get it. 

It is all you are going to get from me. 

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9 minutes ago, rongo said:

There seems to be a tendency for people to add S's to things, though --- it seems to be hard-wired, linguistically. How many times have you heard people refer to it as Pathways  (Pathway)? This happens to a lot of things. A junior high I taught at years ago (Desert Wind) was constantly referred to as "Desert Winds for some reason. 

Yeah, I still have to catch myself on Pathway International. And I covered the inauguration of its president. 
 

That’s why I say it’s understandable a more recent convert would get it wrong, less so a lifelong or even longtime member. 

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On 4/7/2021 at 10:32 AM, MustardSeed said:

I've complained about this before but since I'm annoyed by my last thread gone wild I'm giving myself a pass.  

Deseret book to me is an opportunity for people to profit off of The Gospel.  I don't see any way around that argument.  I get that there is demand, and that those who look for those things have a right to have them - but in my opinion its gross that people would be opportunistic and find ways to make money from peoples' faith.  

I realize I'm the odd man in this point of view but it bother me enough that I'm not insecure about my oddness - I do find that I regularly see a need to yell about something that it seems to be to be so obviously icky and yet so accepted, embraced, encouraged and endorsed. 

milk the mormons. Take a drive through any town in Utah and you will see that it is a thriving business. Having said that, nobody is getting rich of of LDS themed books. 

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51 minutes ago, Freedom said:

Having said that, nobody is getting rich of of LDS themed books. 

A few authors probably have, but only a few from what I could tell when I worked in a church bookstore and attended a booksellers convention. And more likely fictional writers imo. I am thinking maybe Chris Heimdinger (not sure about the name, Tennis Shoes Among the Nephites series), Gerald Lund (Work and the Glory and other series). Apostles who issue popular yearly nonfiction books might be getting significant amounts. The point to make money is to issue books frequently, usually in a series, build up a loyal fan base.
 

Nonfiction authors may have a couple of popular books, but either have narrow expertise or their books become repetitive if they try to publish too frequently.

Artists might also make good money, especially if they can break into the Christian art market. Greg Olsen was the biggest Christian artist in Canada while I was working. 

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8 hours ago, Calm said:

A few authors probably have, but only a few from what I could tell when I worked in a church bookstore and attended a booksellers convention. And more likely fictional writers imo. I am thinking maybe Chris Heimdinger (not sure about the name, Tennis Shoes Among the Nephites series), Gerald Lund (Work and the Glory and other series). Apostles who issue popular yearly nonfiction books might be getting significant amounts. The point to make money is to issue books frequently, usually in a series, build up a loyal fan base.
 

Nonfiction authors may have a couple of popular books, but either have narrow expertise or their books become repetitive if they try to publish too frequently.

Artists might also make good money, especially if they can break into the Christian art market. Greg Olsen was the biggest Christian artist in Canada while I was working. 

I understand Gerald Lund pretty much set himself up for life with the proceeds from the “Work and the Glory” series. 
 

Normally, though, I think it’s standard that a book’s author makes only a small fraction from the sale of his or her book; most of it goes to the publisher, who stands the cost of printing, distribution, marketing, etc. That’s more understandable if you compare it to a newspaper business model, in which the writers are paid only a small fraction from the newspaper’s earnings. 

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9 hours ago, Freedom said:

milk the mormons. Take a drive through any town in Utah and you will see that it is a thriving business. Having said that, nobody is getting rich of of LDS themed books. 

A problem with every religion.  Go to Lourdes or whatever they call it.  

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I highly doubt anyone was getting rich at the temple in Jesus time either.  

I don't have a problem with art.  I'm a professional artist myself, of sorts, but my issue has always been around using the Word to get gain.  It convolutes the message for me personally.  I hold no grudge against those who choose to buy. My heart was affected by an uncle who retired recently from the church institute program who would share with us at dinner his stories of his "prideful colleagues" who pursued fame and fortune the biz.  He himself turned down multiple speaking gigs because he didn't want to mix money with the gospel.  I realize it's extreme but that's how my background formed me today.

FYI

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5 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

I understand Gerald Lund pretty much set himself up for life with the proceeds from the “Work and the Glory” series. 
 

Normally, though, I think it’s standard that a book’s author makes only a small fraction from the sale of his or her book; most of it goes to the publisher, who stands the cost of printing, distribution, marketing, etc. That’s more understandable if you compare it to a newspaper business model, in which the writers are paid only a small fraction from the newspaper’s earnings. 

That stands to reason that the church is making some good money then, since they own the publishing company. 

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