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Received a deseret book catalogue - it turns me off


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4 hours ago, Zeniff said:

Once upon a time we the Church used printed books and manuals for Sunday School and Priesthood/Relief Society meetings and although we could order them from the Church Distribution service many of us went to a Deseret bookstore to buy them.

So convenience is often a factor, as well as price.  And I would rather give my money to a service provider who is either a member or an extension of the Church than to someone with no association with the Church, such as Jeff Bezos.

I agree.  Now hurry up and get 25 posts (visit the "Three-Word Story" and "Last Movie You Watched" threads in Social Hall to build up your post count ;)) so I can upvote your posts. ;)  Welcome to the Board, by the way. :D

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4 hours ago, CV75 said:

How much is known about general authorities supplementing their Church-paid income with book sales / royalties?

 

4 hours ago, HappyJackWagon said:

We know they sell books.

We have no way of auditing their income sources.

So I'd say we don't know much, but it stands to reason the income they make from sales goes somewhere.

Yes.  They may be donating all the proceeds to charity.  I have LDS scholar friends who have done that with their books - never making a profit.

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2 hours ago, Duncan said:

I remember some years ago Pres. Uchtdorf put out a book of his talks but it was stuff that was all online and you would feel jipped by buying it, if you knew that of course. I like that guy Hawkins who does temple art, he writes books and does temple art and makes recommend holders, he has a talent and like everyone else with that kind of talent is capitalizing on it. 

Perhaps you mean if you did not know it was the talk?

I know there were lots of women who did buy it knowing it was his talking. They loved the talk and the book was pretty.  To me it was clutter, but others really like it.

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45 minutes ago, Rain said:

Perhaps you mean if you did not know it was the talk?

I know there were lots of women who did buy it knowing it was his talking. They loved the talk and the book was pretty.  To me it was clutter, but others really like it.

So yeah, if you read some reviews or heard from others that it was just a collection of his talks-all of which were available online- you would be disappointed.

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4 hours ago, Bob Crockett said:

The word is "gyped" and its an ethnic slur directed to Romanians.  Hah hah.  I know it isn't intentional.  But best to remove stuff like that from our vocabularies.

I also have a problem with the stuff sold at Deseret Books but, on the other hand, I appreciate the books compiling the wisdom of the Brethren.  That should be in our homes and DB can't deliver that for free.  Plus I like to shop for new scriptures with wide margins as well as reduced size sets for traveling.  DB is also a traditional book store and carries lots of secular books.  That is where I obtained "No Man Knows My History," and my Bart Ehrman collection, for example.    I could do without the fluff that passes for LDS speculative philosophy.  

Deseret Book. Short for Deseret Book Co. 

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2 hours ago, The Nehor said:

If you are trying to get turned on I would recommend other catalogs rather than Deseret Books.

Deseret Book. Short for Deseret Book Co. 

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4 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

I don’t think this sort of thing comes from Church members. Not devout ones, at least. It puts me off, actually. 

That's no surprise.

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10 hours ago, CV75 said:

They make no claim that the object or content brings salvation.

Not always true, but hopefully in most cases they don’t. 
 

I have relatives who invested a great deal of time and money into developing a training aid for their stake back when this was not unusual and people got offended at them when they got upset that their copyrighted material was being dittoed and passed around the stake after they had submitted it for approval to fully develop it.  They lost what they were depending on as income to pay their mortgage and stuff because others saw anything relating to the gospel as community property.  So part of me is sympathetic to the need to be reimbursed for quality work one wants to share.

 

But I also get turned off by inexpensive, mass produced products because it comes across as too easy, too materialistic.  It bugged me that so much of what filled the Church bookstore I worked at was either junk food or bland survival rations, rather than a feast of knowledge and spirit.  But what makes the connection for one person may not for another.   A Moroni Christmas tree topper or ornaments of all the temples makes me cringe, but for those who see it triggering thoughts of the Restoration of the Gospel or eternal families, wonderful gifts from God at Christmas time, that isn’t inherently a tacky thing.  I think the difficulty comes in when making money or getting attention becomes the motivator rather than just sharing what one has and being paid so one can do that.

Edited by Calm
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29 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Deseret Book. Short for Deseret Book Co. 

Oh, just you wait. One day you will make a grammar mistake and I will be there to catch it. When you least expect it. Yes. YES! One day I will have my revenge! And it shall be sweet. One day. Be it today or decades from now. Then....then I will win.

MWAHAAHHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAH!

Why yes, I am off my meds. How did you know?

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11 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

Are you acquainted with Roman Catholic and Protestant bookstores?  If so, how do you feel about them?  Do they perform a needed service (aside from the anti-Mormon books and pamphlets they carry)?  How about those LDS authors who contribute all their profits to non-profit endeavors (I know of some of those)?

I think contributing all profits is marvelous. 

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11 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

Some of us are actually interested in learning more from General authorities etc.

I can't imagine why a person so obviously immersed in dreaming up gospel questions on this board would not also seek other sources.

It doesn't make sense.

Are you suggesting that I don’t seek other sources? And must those sources have a price tag? That doesn’t make sense to me. 

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9 hours ago, Rain said:

Jewelry - some people don't like jewelry.  I'm not big on it.  But why should I be bothered by someone wearing jewelry that expresses their faith and has meaning to them over someone who wear jewelery to look good  fashionable, or put together?  

People wanting it doesn’t bother me at all.

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1 hour ago, MustardSeed said:

Are you suggesting that I don’t seek other sources? And must those sources have a price tag? That doesn’t make sense to me. 

Das Kapital.

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14 hours ago, strappinglad said:

I had a similar feeling when I looked at the catalog. The books are one thing , but I felt the jewelry and do-dads off-putting. A CTR coffee mug?? ( OK , I exaggerate !! )

That would be a CTR hot cocoa mug!

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13 hours ago, SteveO said:

I’m pretty sure you didn’t look...Joseph would’ve loved the royalties of a $16 paperback BoM...

During Joseph's time the price of a book would probably be a penny. :)

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15 hours ago, MustardSeed said:

I've complained about this before but since I'm annoyed by my last thread gone wild I'm giving myself a pass.  

Deseret book to me is an opportunity for people to profit off of The Gospel.  I don't see any way around that argument.  I get that there is demand, and that those who look for those things have a right to have them - but in my opinion its gross that people would be opportunistic and find ways to make money from peoples' faith.  

I realize I'm the odd man in this point of view but it bother me enough that I'm not insecure about my oddness - I do find that I regularly see a need to yell about something that it seems to be to be so obviously icky and yet so accepted, embraced, encouraged and endorsed. 

I think that when a person writes a book and it costs money to buy it, the person who wrote it deserves compensation from a royality. The books cost money to produce too. It is not cheap. And people are paid a salary for producing it to its finished form. And then the store does have employees who need to be paid. I have to say that most likely quite a few books take a loss and are remaindered.

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8 hours ago, Calm said:

Not always true, but hopefully in most cases they don’t.

For those cases where this is not always true, do we have some examples where Deseret Book is selling books and other items that the authors/producers claim bring salvation?

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13 hours ago, Duncan said:

I remember some years ago Pres. Uchtdorf put out a book of his talks but it was stuff that was all online and you would feel jipped by buying it, if you knew that of course. I like that guy Hawkins who does temple art, he writes books and does temple art and makes recommend holders, he has a talent and like everyone else with that kind of talent is capitalizing on it. 

Hey some people like books for the books' sake!

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8 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Deseret Book. Short for Deseret Book Co. 

How about Deserets's Books?

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19 hours ago, MustardSeed said:

I've complained about this before but since I'm annoyed by my last thread gone wild I'm giving myself a pass.  

Deseret book to me is an opportunity for people to profit off of The Gospel.  I don't see any way around that argument.  I get that there is demand, and that those who look for those things have a right to have them - but in my opinion its gross that people would be opportunistic and find ways to make money from peoples' faith.  

I realize I'm the odd man in this point of view but it bother me enough that I'm not insecure about my oddness - I do find that I regularly see a need to yell about something that it seems to be to be so obviously icky and yet so accepted, embraced, encouraged and endorsed. 

New tangent: As a wholly owned subsidiary of Deseret Management Corporation, the holding company for business firms owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and a for-profit corporation registered in Utah, does DBC give you heartburn on that note?

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9 hours ago, Calm said:

Not always true, but hopefully in most cases they don’t. 
 

I have relatives who invested a great deal of time and money into developing a training aid for their stake back when this was not unusual and people got offended at them when they got upset that their copyrighted material was being dittoed and passed around the stake after they had submitted it for approval to fully develop it.  They lost what they were depending on as income to pay their mortgage and stuff because others saw anything relating to the gospel as community property.  So part of me is sympathetic to the need to be reimbursed for quality work one wants to share.

 

But I also get turned off by inexpensive, mass produced products because it comes across as too easy, too materialistic.  It bugged me that so much of what filled the Church bookstore I worked at was either junk food or bland survival rations, rather than a feast of knowledge and spirit.  But what makes the connection for one person may not for another.   A Moroni Christmas tree topper or ornaments of all the temples makes me cringe, but for those who see it triggering thoughts of the Restoration of the Gospel or eternal families, wonderful gifts from God at Christmas time, that isn’t inherently a tacky thing.  I think the difficulty comes in when making money or getting attention becomes the motivator rather than just sharing what one has and being paid so one can do that.

I probably won’t ever have you over at Christmas time, because our tree has both an Angel Moroni statue replica as a tree topper and souvenir ornaments of temples we’ve visited. No lie. 
 

I don’t think the tree topper is any the more kitschy than the real statues that adorn our temples. And the temple ornaments are in keeping with our overall theme of collector ornaments that bring to mind past memories and experiences. Memories and sentiment are a huge part of Christmas — for us, at least. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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