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Bombshell BYU announcement


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9 hours ago, Ipod Touch said:

70% acceptance is pretty pathetic. Certainly not the rate of a top-tier University.

Maybe numbers were for just this year and LDS families are more okay to put off university for a year than other families, so submissions way down?

Maybe if I can find a contact number, I will find an urge to write for clarification. 

Edited by Calm
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46 minutes ago, Calm said:

Maybe numbers were for just this year and LDS families are more okay to put off university for a year than other families, so submissions way down?

Maybe if I can find a contact number, I will find an urge to write for clarification. 

I heard just the opposite, that admissions were tighter than usual this year (my son was just accepted, so I’ve been more alert to this than I might otherwise have been). 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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How will BYU determine if you are BIPOC?  Will they discriminate against those of us that are transracial?  I'd hate to see the hard work and sacrifices made by our pioneering forebears like Rachel Dolezal, Elisabeth Warren, and Vanilla Ice be in vain.  Being fluid in your race is nice because you can take advantage of all the programs and opportunities set aside for certain races but still claim to be white if pulled over by police.

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9 hours ago, Danzo said:
17 hours ago, AtlanticMike said:

I just asked one of the black guys on my crew if he knows what a BIPOC is and he said he thought it was a high end Mercedes Benz 🤣🤣🤣🤣. I told him no, that was a maybach, and then I told him what BIPOC stood for and he said he would punch the person that called him that. He's a cool dude but you don't want to get on his bad side.

Expand  

In my and (others I Know,) bipoc is just a bigoted term to try and creat a false duality among cultures.  Its a way making sure people know what side they are on.

Exactly!! My wife is Filipino and I talked to her last night about BIPOC, which I learned about on this thread, and she said she would never write that out to describe anyone. She won't even use POC. Most people don't realize how dangerous it is to  categorize people. Check out what just happened with the  Coca-Cola company, in my opinion, that's the end goal.

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1 hour ago, Scott Lloyd said:

I heard just the opposite, that admissions were tighter than usual this year (my son was just accepted, so I’ve been more alert to this than I might otherwise have been). 

2020 acceptance rate for freshman was 68.5%   (7,942/11,593)

2021 acceptance rate for freshman is 59%   (7,309/12,379)

 

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11 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

The “woke” language fuels my wariness about the ideological basis and intent for the recommendations. 
 

Added later: For example, take the word “equity” in the cover letter you quoted. I don’t know how aware you are of this, but of late, that has become something of a buzzword in the “wokeness” debate, wherein “equity” is contrasted in meaning with “equality.” For an explanation, see this article from Winston-Salem State University:

https://www.wssu.edu/strategic-plan/documents/a-summary-of-equity-vs-equality.pdf
 

From the article:

“The terms equality and equity are often used interchangeably; however, they differ in important ways. Equality is typically defined as treating everyone the same and giving everyone access to the same opportunities. Meanwhile, equity refers to proportional representation (by race, class, gender, etc.) in those same opportunities.”

Some folks, seeing the word “equity” in the written proposals at BYU, might be misled into thinking what is meant is equality of opportunity, when what might actually be contemplated is equity in the allocation and disbursement of scarce resources and privileges as defined above. 

Yes, I understand how new/unfamiliar terminology can set off warning bells for some which is why I’m wondering how things might be expressed to the uninitiated (I’m thinking of the Church’s efforts to explain esoteric terminology to new converts, which I’ve noticed is offered at the bottom of some of the Liahona articles). Your example is a case in point.

This is why I was seeking your input in rephrasing a recommendation or two as examples. The media relations and social media manager on the committee didn’t seem to think it necessary. Not badgering here, but I figured you’d be a good person to pull that off.

While this was presented to the University President, it is also viewed by the general public who would be interested in being made aware of problems that have been identified through a responsible process.

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20 hours ago, CV75 said:

How would you have written the recommendation(s) that give you the greatest heartburn over what you consider to be ideological terminology?

Friendly challenge: pick a couple and channel your best William E. McLellin! :) I would really be interested in seeing another perspective in how this could have been better presented. Thank you!

Here's my stab at it (I've taken out my editorializing in the OP, and refined some of them). I think some will blanche at the frankness of some of them ("non-white" instead of BIPOC), because there is a psychological reason why euphemisms and jargon tend towards positive instead of negative self-labels (e.g., pro-choice/pro-life instead of anti-life/anti-abortion). My version is in bold:

1. Create a central Office of Diversity and Belonging at the university charged with strategic planning and implementation of initiatives to assist students and employees with issues related to race, equity and belonging.

1. Create an Office of Diversity.

2. Create a new position of vice president for diversity and belonging who reports directly to the president, is a member of the President’s Council and who oversees the Office of Diversity and Belonging.

2. Create a new position of Vice President of Diversity.

3. Implement clear lines of accountability to empower the Office of Diversity and Belonging to coordinate, focus and leverage the efforts of Multicultural Student Services, International Student and Scholar Services and the Office of Student Success and Inclusion. These offices might efficiently report to the Office of Diversity and Belonging which will allow for focused efforts to serve BIPOC students academically and to enhance their sense of well-being and belonging.

3. Give these new positions the authority and „teeth“ to do their job.

4. Develop and implement extensive diversity and inclusion training programs and resources for students, faculty, staff and administrators. This training would be facilitated by the Office of Diversity and Belonging.

4. Develop and implement training programs on diversity, equity, and racism for administrators, faculty and staff, and students.

5. Commit to curricular changes to general education, religion and elective courses that educate students on race, unity and diversity

5. Change the curriculum for general education, religion, and elective classes to educate about diversity.

6. Consider additions to the Aims of a BYU Education that reflect current statements from prophets and apostles about the need to demonstrate civility, racial and ethnic harmony and mutual respect. Promote current language in BYU’s mission statement that calls for “loving, genuine concern for the welfare of our neighbor” and for a broad education that helps students “understand important ideas in their own cultural tradition as well as that of others.”

6. Update the current „Aims of a BYU Education“ to reflect these changes.

7. Promote and implement the Fostering an Enriched Environment Policy throughout the university.

7. Promote and implement „Fostering an Enriched Environment“ at the university.

8. Encourage colleges and departments to adopt statements on race, equity and belonging that can be used in college and department operations and communications.

8. Instruct colleges and departments to change mission statements to reflect these changes.

9. Establish a standing university committee dedicated to advancing racial understanding, enhancing equity and promoting belonging for BIPOC communities at BYU. In order to more expeditiously accomplish this recommendation, a proposed charter is included...

9. Establish a permanent committee to advance equity for non-white faculty and students.

10. Establish a new position of vice president or associate vice president of enrollment management and student success that is empowered to create strategic initiatives for recruitment, admission, scholarship, financial aid, retention and student success for all students and that is particularly charged with leading initiatives associated with attracting, admitting, retaining and supporting the academic success of BIPOC students.

10. Create a new position of vice president of enrollment management, whose emphasis will be recruitment, admission, scholarships, financial aid, retention, and success of non-white students.

11. Form a Recruitment, Admissions, and Student Success Committee with a charge to assist the vice president or associate vice president of enrollment management and student success to optimize attracting, admitting, retaining and supporting the academic success of BIPOC and other students. This committee should be composed of faculty members and university administrators committed to fostering an enriched environment.

11. Form a committee to assist the vice president in implementing #10.

12. Develop a strategic plan to increase graduation rates for BIPOC students. This plan should include collaboration between services and offices that are intended to assist BIPOC students to succeed academically.

12. Develop a plan to increase graduation rates for non-white students.

13. Design and implement a race-conscious recruitment strategy to attract more BIPOC student applicants to BYU.

13. Recruit and admit more non-white students to BYU.

14. Perform an independent validation study on all current admissions policies, particularly the weighting systems, to evaluate whether they have a disparate impact on BIPOC applicants. Ensure that the admissions process is holistic in its application and reflects the values promoted in BYU’s Fostering an Enriched Environment Policy.

14. Perform an independent evaluation of the admissions process – especially weighting – to enable more non-white students to qualify for admissions.

15. Invite the Office of the General Counsel to evaluate the legal parameters of a race-conscious admissions model for BYU, in the interest of pursuing an enriched environment for the student body.

15. Evaluate the legality and potential legal problems of race-conscious admissions at BYU.

16. Select prestigious scholarship recipients with greater emphasis on a holistic review of the entire applicant file, with criteria to include commitment to excellence, leadership potential, socioeconomic profile, adverse life circumstances, etc. We recommend a scrutiny of policies for determining scholarship criteria and their impact on BIPOC applicants.

16. Enable more non-white students to be competitive for prestigious scholarships.

17. Create Enriched Environment Scholarships honoring early BIPOC members of the church, such as Jane Manning James, Elijah Abel and others, to be made available to students who have demonstrated a commitment to the values contained in the Fostering an Enriched Environment Policy.

17. Create new scholarships for non-white students, named after non-white LDS pioneers (e.g., Jane Manning James, Elijah Abel, etc.).

18. Create socioeconomic disadvantage scholarships, in addition to existing need-based scholarships, for students who demonstrate that they come from socioeconomically disadvantaged circumstances, who have faced adversities attendant to such circumstances and who demonstrate the need for financial support in order to obtain a BYU education.

18. Create more scholarships, in addition to existing need-based scholarships, for students who come from socioeconomically disadvantaged circumstances.

19. Create a process that allows students to report instances of racial discrimination on campus. Through this process, such claims could be investigated and redressed, as appropriate.

19. Create a process for students to report racial discrimination on campus.

20. Establish a dedicated, visible space on campus for underrepresented students and those who serve this population; such a space will foster community and promote belonging.

20. Create a dedicated, visible space on campus for minority students.

21. Take steps to ensure that the BYU Honor Code and Dress and Grooming Standards are applied with cultural competence and sensitivity.

21. Ensure that the honor code and dress code does not go out of its way to target non-white students.

22. Design a best practices model for college and department faculty search committees to identify qualified BIPOC candidates for BYU faculty positions. Such a model could be based on three intertwined aims: commitment to the mission of the university and its sponsoring institution (mission fit), excellence in academic discipline (including teaching and scholarship), and diversity (in its many forms: racial and intellectual).

22. Recruit, attract, and retain more non-white faculty to BYU.

23. Assist and incentivize colleges and departments in developing a strategic plan to identify and mentor BIPOC students who are interested in pursuing careers in academia. This will also serve as a potential pipeline for future hires at BYU.

23. Assist and incentivize non-white students who want to pursue graduate school.

24. Create an Emerging Scholars Program that allows the university to track, identify and invite BIPOC Ph.D. students to present their scholarship at BYU.

24. Attract more non-white PhD. students to present and conduct their research at BYU.

25. Design a strategic plan that will assist with mentoring, training, supporting, recognizing, connecting and developing BIPOC faculty at BYU, while consciously planning to alleviate the “cultural taxation” burdens carried by BIPOC faculty at BYU.

25. Reduce cultural discomfort for non-white faculty at BYU.

26. Provide BIPOC faculty with opportunities to serve in senior university leadership positions.

26. Promote more non-white faculty into senior administrative positions at BYU.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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There was a lot of redundancy or unnecessary restatement that is on the cutting floor in my version. 

One thing that isn't clear in these (and I know that this is only the first step, a rough draft) is, for example, #18. The proposed "sociologically disadvantaged" or "adverse life circumstances" scholarships are presumably in addition to the existing "need-based" scholarships (isn't that what "need-based" is?). I was a poor white student from a poor white family, and I never qualified for any of these "need-based" scholarships. I (and later my wife with me) were able to work our way through school at $6.00 an hour, without debt, but man, "need-based" aid would have really helped. I strongly doubt that these are foreseen as applying equally to all students; the spirit and letter of these proposals strongly skews towards the non-white students (which is the whole point of the 26 action steps). I say this because some have said that there are disadvantaged white students that these would also apply to. I really doubt it. 

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49 minutes ago, rongo said:

Here's my stab at it (I've taken out my editorializing in the OP, and refined some of them). I think some will blanche at the frankness of some of them ("non-white" instead of BIPOC), because there is a psychological reason why euphemisms and jargon tend towards positive instead of negative self-labels (e.g., pro-choice/pro-life instead of anti-life/anti-abortion). My version is in bold:

1. Create a central Office of Diversity and Belonging at the university charged with strategic planning and implementation of initiatives to assist students and employees with issues related to race, equity and belonging.

1. Create an Office of Diversity.

2. Create a new position of vice president for diversity and belonging who reports directly to the president, is a member of the President’s Council and who oversees the Office of Diversity and Belonging.

2. Create a new position of Vice President of Diversity.

3. Implement clear lines of accountability to empower the Office of Diversity and Belonging to coordinate, focus and leverage the efforts of Multicultural Student Services, International Student and Scholar Services and the Office of Student Success and Inclusion. These offices might efficiently report to the Office of Diversity and Belonging which will allow for focused efforts to serve BIPOC students academically and to enhance their sense of well-being and belonging.

3. Give these new positions the authority and „teeth“ to do their job.

4. Develop and implement extensive diversity and inclusion training programs and resources for students, faculty, staff and administrators. This training would be facilitated by the Office of Diversity and Belonging.

4. Develop and implement training programs on diversity, equity, and racism for administrators, faculty and staff, and students.

5. Commit to curricular changes to general education, religion and elective courses that educate students on race, unity and diversity

5. Change the curriculum for general education, religion, and elective classes to educate about diversity.

6. Consider additions to the Aims of a BYU Education that reflect current statements from prophets and apostles about the need to demonstrate civility, racial and ethnic harmony and mutual respect. Promote current language in BYU’s mission statement that calls for “loving, genuine concern for the welfare of our neighbor” and for a broad education that helps students “understand important ideas in their own cultural tradition as well as that of others.”

6. Update the current „Aims of a BYU Education“ to reflect these changes.

7. Promote and implement the Fostering an Enriched Environment Policy throughout the university.

7. Promote and implement „Fostering an Enriched Environment“ at the university.

8. Encourage colleges and departments to adopt statements on race, equity and belonging that can be used in college and department operations and communications.

8. Instruct colleges and departments to change mission statements to reflect these changes.

9. Establish a standing university committee dedicated to advancing racial understanding, enhancing equity and promoting belonging for BIPOC communities at BYU. In order to more expeditiously accomplish this recommendation, a proposed charter is included...

9. Establish a permanent committee to advance equity for non-white faculty and students.

10. Establish a new position of vice president or associate vice president of enrollment management and student success that is empowered to create strategic initiatives for recruitment, admission, scholarship, financial aid, retention and student success for all students and that is particularly charged with leading initiatives associated with attracting, admitting, retaining and supporting the academic success of BIPOC students.

10. Create a new position of vice president of enrollment management, whose emphasis will be recruitment, admission, scholarships, financial aid, retention, and success of non-white students.

11. Form a Recruitment, Admissions, and Student Success Committee with a charge to assist the vice president or associate vice president of enrollment management and student success to optimize attracting, admitting, retaining and supporting the academic success of BIPOC and other students. This committee should be composed of faculty members and university administrators committed to fostering an enriched environment.

11. Form a committee to assist the vice president in implementing #10.

12. Develop a strategic plan to increase graduation rates for BIPOC students. This plan should include collaboration between services and offices that are intended to assist BIPOC students to succeed academically.

12. Develop a plan to increase graduation rates for non-white students.

13. Design and implement a race-conscious recruitment strategy to attract more BIPOC student applicants to BYU.

13. Recruit and admit more non-white students to BYU.

14. Perform an independent validation study on all current admissions policies, particularly the weighting systems, to evaluate whether they have a disparate impact on BIPOC applicants. Ensure that the admissions process is holistic in its application and reflects the values promoted in BYU’s Fostering an Enriched Environment Policy.

14. Perform an independent evaluation of the admissions process – especially weighting – to enable more non-white students to qualify for admissions.

15. Invite the Office of the General Counsel to evaluate the legal parameters of a race-conscious admissions model for BYU, in the interest of pursuing an enriched environment for the student body.

15. Evaluate the legality and potential legal problems of race-conscious admissions at BYU.

16. Select prestigious scholarship recipients with greater emphasis on a holistic review of the entire applicant file, with criteria to include commitment to excellence, leadership potential, socioeconomic profile, adverse life circumstances, etc. We recommend a scrutiny of policies for determining scholarship criteria and their impact on BIPOC applicants.

16. Enable more non-white students to be competitive for prestigious scholarships.

17. Create Enriched Environment Scholarships honoring early BIPOC members of the church, such as Jane Manning James, Elijah Abel and others, to be made available to students who have demonstrated a commitment to the values contained in the Fostering an Enriched Environment Policy.

17. Create new scholarships for non-white students, named after non-white LDS pioneers (e.g., Jane Manning James, Elijah Abel, etc.).

18. Create socioeconomic disadvantage scholarships, in addition to existing need-based scholarships, for students who demonstrate that they come from socioeconomically disadvantaged circumstances, who have faced adversities attendant to such circumstances and who demonstrate the need for financial support in order to obtain a BYU education.

18. Create more scholarships, in addition to existing need-based scholarships, for students who come from socioeconomically disadvantaged circumstances.

19. Create a process that allows students to report instances of racial discrimination on campus. Through this process, such claims could be investigated and redressed, as appropriate.

19. Create a process for students to report racial discrimination on campus.

20. Establish a dedicated, visible space on campus for underrepresented students and those who serve this population; such a space will foster community and promote belonging.

20. Create a dedicated, visible space on campus for minority students.

21. Take steps to ensure that the BYU Honor Code and Dress and Grooming Standards are applied with cultural competence and sensitivity.

21. Ensure that the honor code and dress code does not go out of its way to target non-white students.

22. Design a best practices model for college and department faculty search committees to identify qualified BIPOC candidates for BYU faculty positions. Such a model could be based on three intertwined aims: commitment to the mission of the university and its sponsoring institution (mission fit), excellence in academic discipline (including teaching and scholarship), and diversity (in its many forms: racial and intellectual).

22. Recruit, attract, and retain more non-white faculty to BYU.

23. Assist and incentivize colleges and departments in developing a strategic plan to identify and mentor BIPOC students who are interested in pursuing careers in academia. This will also serve as a potential pipeline for future hires at BYU.

23. Assist and incentivize non-white students who want to pursue graduate school.

24. Create an Emerging Scholars Program that allows the university to track, identify and invite BIPOC Ph.D. students to present their scholarship at BYU.

24. Attract more non-white PhD. students to present and conduct their research at BYU.

25. Design a strategic plan that will assist with mentoring, training, supporting, recognizing, connecting and developing BIPOC faculty at BYU, while consciously planning to alleviate the “cultural taxation” burdens carried by BIPOC faculty at BYU.

25. Reduce cultural discomfort for non-white faculty at BYU.

26. Provide BIPOC faculty with opportunities to serve in senior university leadership positions.

26. Promote more non-white faculty into senior administrative positions at BYU.

I appreciate the attempt! A for effort! This certainly removes what some might see a triggering, ideological jargon.

Some observations with a couple of questions:

The replacement of BIPOC with “non-white” or “minority” seems innocuous enough on the surface. 

Words like race, equity, unity and belonging don’t seem to be very “triggering” words, so why replace them with “diversity” in some places, and leave them in others?

The other changes seem to have to with approach (removing strategic planning and initiatives to assist students and employees, etc.), structure (reporting lines) and style (instruct vs. encourage, plan vs. strategic plan, etc.) which to me are matters of management and leadership preference. Or wordsmithing (“at” vs “throughout”) and reduction for public consumption or media reporting. Are any of these kinds of changes intended to convey a change or nuance in the recommendation, or just meant to be practical in terms of presentation?

I think you’ve made #16 makes more aggressive in that it presupposes that this is the way to go without a “scrutiny of policies”. The same with #21 – your edit presupposes targeting which sounds intentional. Same with #22 – I think the university would/should seek nothing less than “best practice” in favor of just getting something in place and fixing it later. And #26 as well – “promote” instead of “provide opportunities” is much more aggressive.

#23 changed the whole intent (replacing grad school for career in academia), no mentoring.

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12 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

This is off topic but you are the poster child for why the argument for social determinism- that "individual" free agents do not exist because we are all "programmed" by our cultures, is simply false. 

This argument has been used to argue that unique individuals with their own subjective points of view do not exist, because we are all virtual robots programmed by culture. In philosophy this is called the "death of man" thesis, and is important in arguments for and against free will  https://g.co/kgs/pL5obe

Bax argues that the cultural diversity that is the essence of our lives makes an argument that the self is culturally contingent very weak at best

 

 

It is off topic, but there’s been that before and rongo said he didn’t mind. Personally I always found the either/or language with free will and determinism odd. It was alway yes/and to me. Being a cultural chameleon is in itself based from a subset of cultural experiences. And my cultural/lived experiences definitely effect my outlook and decisions. I don’t freely choose the lens I’ve been given. But I can choose to some degree what I focus my gaze on. 
 

with luv, 

BD 

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36 minutes ago, CV75 said:

I appreciate the attempt! A for effort! This certainly removes what some might see a triggering, ideological jargon.

Some observations with a couple of questions:

The replacement of BIPOC with “non-white” or “minority” seems innocuous enough on the surface. 

Words like race, equity, unity and belonging don’t seem to be very “triggering” words, so why replace them with “diversity” in some places, and leave them in others?

The other changes seem to have to with approach (removing strategic planning and initiatives to assist students and employees, etc.), structure (reporting lines) and style (instruct vs. encourage, plan vs. strategic plan, etc.) which to me are matters of management and leadership preference. Or wordsmithing (“at” vs “throughout”) and reduction for public consumption or media reporting. Are any of these kinds of changes intended to convey a change or nuance in the recommendation, or just meant to be practical in terms of presentation?

I think you’ve made #16 makes more aggressive in that it presupposes that this is the way to go without a “scrutiny of policies”. The same with #21 – your edit presupposes targeting which sounds intentional. Same with #22 – I think the university would/should seek nothing less than “best practice” in favor of just getting something in place and fixing it later. And #26 as well – “promote” instead of “provide opportunities” is much more aggressive.

#23 changed the whole intent (replacing grad school for career in academia), no mentoring.

Overall, I sought to remove the turgidity (bloatedness) that characterizes a lot of committee creations in a number of fields (not just academia). Often, by sharply reducing the syllables and redundancies, it is a far better communication effort than what people are normally treated to. The University of Chicago used to have a neat site (connected with the English department, I think. Now no longer availabe) with a "random academic language generator" that would spit out the type of language that appears in academic journals. You could then click on the "random critic response" that would give an equally bloated response. It was really funny, and you could keep having it generate "academic language" again and again. The point was to discourage that sort of thing. 

I was fully aware in doing it that my shortened renditions didn't retain the full original meaning, and my version would by no means have been a suitable "finished product." I think it would have been an improvement, though. 

Examples:

#1: who reports directly to the president, is a member of the President’s Council and who oversees the Office of Diversity and Belonging. It goes without saying that this vice president will report up the hierarchy and have a seat at the table. Doesn't need to be said, IMO.

#3: Holy smokes ---- much more bloated and wordy than necessary. Probably a balance between my bare bones approach and that would be best (but, leaning towards bare bones). :) 

#4: This training would be facilitated by the Office of Diversity and Belonging. Well, no kidding. Completely unnecessary to say, IMO. 

#8: Encourage colleges and departments to adopt statements on race, equity and belonging that can be used in college and department operations and communications. Unnecessary to say, and redundant, IMO. Of course the mission statements would "be used in college and department operations and communications." 

#10 I found interesting, because the "for all students" was slipped in, but then it makes it plain that the new vice president position would be "particularly charged with leading initiatives associated with attracting, admitting, retaining and supporting the academic success of BIPOC students." That makes the "for all students" kind of a subordinate afterthought. And hasn't BYU always had staff who carry out "strategic initiatives for recruitment, admission, scholarship, financial aid, retention and student success for all students?" 

#11: Bloated and self-evident. Of course the new committee would consist of faculty and administrators and would assist the vice president . . . whom the committee is being created to advise.

#12:  Unnecessary to state that the plan would entail "collaboration between services and offices that are intended to assist BIPOC students to succeed academically." No kidding. 

#13: I think the committee was trying to hide naked intent behind buzzwords. "Design and implement a race-conscious recruitment strategy to attract more BIPOC student applicants to BYU = "Recruit and admit more non-white students to BYU." Plain and simple, but it doesn't sound good when you put it that way. That's exactly what it means, though. 

Etc.

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1 hour ago, CV75 said:

The other changes seem to have to with approach (removing strategic planning and initiatives to assist students and employees, etc.), structure (reporting lines) and style (instruct vs. encourage, plan vs. strategic plan, etc.) which to me are matters of management and leadership preference. Or wordsmithing (“at” vs “throughout”) and reduction for public consumption or media reporting. Are any of these kinds of changes intended to convey a change or nuance in the recommendation, or just meant to be practical in terms of presentation?

I think you’ve made #16 makes more aggressive in that it presupposes that this is the way to go without a “scrutiny of policies”. The same with #21 – your edit presupposes targeting which sounds intentional. Same with #22 – I think the university would/should seek nothing less than “best practice” in favor of just getting something in place and fixing it later. And #26 as well – “promote” instead of “provide opportunities” is much more aggressive.

#23 changed the whole intent (replacing grad school for career in academia), no mentoring.

1) Overall, most changes were more for simplification and more effective communication. I tried not to lead the jury in terms of ideology. 

2) Regarding #16, I think that there is a zero percent chance that after the "scrutiny of policies" review, the status quo would reign. BYU isn't going to go through all of this so publicly and talk about "transformative and historic changes" without . . . transformative and historic changes. 

I did have to think more about #21 (honor and dress code), and this is a tough one to word. I don't think my presupposition is in error, though. "Cultural competence and sensitivity" with regards to honor and dress code denote --- if you pin people down and get them to admit it --- means "as applied to non-white students." There has already been a loosening with facial hair, hair length, etc., and I don't think this is addressing letting white women wear shorter skirts or shorts, or white men wear sleeveless shirts. Like with my #13 comment in my last post, it doesn't sound good if you simply say this, so euphemism is used. Of course this application of "cultural competence and sensitivity" is going to entail intent and targeting (or conscious lack of targeting). That's what "cultural competence and sensitivity" means in this context.

3) Regarding #22: Yes, "best practices" is a buzzword I leave on the cutting room floor, no matter where it's used. :) The whole thing after "best practices" was a wordy mess, that just meant what I shortened it to. As an aside: the insertion of "and intellectual" is interesting. BYU's faculty has become more liberal over the decades, but it's hard to envision hard-core woke faculty at BYU. This is a separate issue from the race issue, and the only mention in these action steps.

4) I disagree about changing the whole intent with #23. What is the route to academia for aspiring non-white students? That would be graduate school, right? This item is about finding and helping them get into and succeed in grad school. What is the purpose and end goal of mentoring? Success in . . . making it to grad school (so that they can enter academia). 

 

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5 hours ago, gopher said:

2020 acceptance rate for freshman was 68.5%   (7,942/11,593)

2021 acceptance rate for freshman is 59%   (7,309/12,379)

 

Info from?

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Here are some buzzwords I have assembled in my 21 years as a junior high/high school teacher (I have a Word file for things like this). I can't believe I didn't think of "holistic" (it's been used for years), but I put it on the list now. :) 

 

skill set

authentic assessment

STEM/STEAM

engagement

cross-curricular

project-based

big ideas

essential questions

power standards

synergy

proactive

best practices

data-driven

rigor

stakeholders

narrative

dialogue

accommodations/modifications

paradigm

21st Century skills

walk the walk/ talk the talk

buy-in

lifelong learners

growth mindset

piece (e.g., “accountability piece”)

executive function

evaluation instrument

Kagan structures

metacognition

holistic

---

The University of Chicago site for the "random sentence generator" (now defunct) was here:

http://writing-program.uchicago.edu/toys/randomsentence/index.htm

For a taste of the fun it provided in poking fun of academic bloated language, see here:

https://www.facebook.com/uchicago/posts/for-a-new-way-to-dehistoricize-your-epistemological-praxis-try-the-virtual-acade/10155825620960650/

 

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Just now, rongo said:

dialogue

As used as verb, as in, "Let's meet after school and dialogue about how we are going to track benchmarks." Ugh. 

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I just saw this:

https://thefederalist.com/2021/03/05/illinois-teachers-shamed-for-color-of-their-skin-in-taxpayer-sponsored-antiracist-training/

Naperville was my stake during high school (I lived in Bolingbrook). 

I don't know how prominent the though is among critical race theorists, but the thought was expressed in this "implicit bias" training that expecting black teachers to teach white students is "covert white supremacy." Not to mentioning insisting on segregation. 

That kind of defeats the purpose of encouraging black people to go into teaching, doesn't it? Or encouraging black people to become professors, academics, etc. 

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10 hours ago, Rain said:

Are you saying she only thinks the way she does because of her culture?

That is not at all what I am saying.

What I am saying is that because we are ALL raised in different situations we are all individuals and the idea that we are determined automatons is not tenable 

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1 hour ago, BlueDreams said:

And my cultural/lived experiences definitely effect my outlook and decisions. I don’t freely choose the lens I’ve been given. But I can choose to some degree what I focus my gaze on. 

Brilliant analogy, thanks!

And I also think at birth we also get a "lens grinder" to alter that lens a little here and a little there!

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2 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

Brilliant analogy, thanks!

And I also think at birth we also get a "lens grinder" to alter that lens a little here and a little there!

Oh that sounds painful and jarring, but that pain is part of the process too so it works.

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1 hour ago, rongo said:

Overall, I sought to remove the turgidity (bloatedness) that characterizes a lot of committee creations in a number of fields (not just academia). Often, by sharply reducing the syllables and redundancies, it is a far better communication effort than what people are normally treated to. The University of Chicago used to have a neat site (connected with the English department, I think. Now no longer availabe) with a "random academic language generator" that would spit out the type of language that appears in academic journals. You could then click on the "random critic response" that would give an equally bloated response. It was really funny, and you could keep having it generate "academic language" again and again. The point was to discourage that sort of thing. 

I was fully aware in doing it that my shortened renditions didn't retain the full original meaning, and my version would by no means have been a suitable "finished product." I think it would have been an improvement, though. 

Examples:

#1: who reports directly to the president, is a member of the President’s Council and who oversees the Office of Diversity and Belonging. It goes without saying that this vice president will report up the hierarchy and have a seat at the table. Doesn't need to be said, IMO.

#3: Holy smokes ---- much more bloated and wordy than necessary. Probably a balance between my bare bones approach and that would be best (but, leaning towards bare bones). :) 

#4: This training would be facilitated by the Office of Diversity and Belonging. Well, no kidding. Completely unnecessary to say, IMO. 

#8: Encourage colleges and departments to adopt statements on race, equity and belonging that can be used in college and department operations and communications. Unnecessary to say, and redundant, IMO. Of course the mission statements would "be used in college and department operations and communications." 

#10 I found interesting, because the "for all students" was slipped in, but then it makes it plain that the new vice president position would be "particularly charged with leading initiatives associated with attracting, admitting, retaining and supporting the academic success of BIPOC students." That makes the "for all students" kind of a subordinate afterthought. And hasn't BYU always had staff who carry out "strategic initiatives for recruitment, admission, scholarship, financial aid, retention and student success for all students?" 

#11: Bloated and self-evident. Of course the new committee would consist of faculty and administrators and would assist the vice president . . . whom the committee is being created to advise.

#12:  Unnecessary to state that the plan would entail "collaboration between services and offices that are intended to assist BIPOC students to succeed academically." No kidding. 

#13: I think the committee was trying to hide naked intent behind buzzwords. "Design and implement a race-conscious recruitment strategy to attract more BIPOC student applicants to BYU = "Recruit and admit more non-white students to BYU." Plain and simple, but it doesn't sound good when you put it that way. That's exactly what it means, though. 

Etc.

47 minutes ago, rongo said:

1) Overall, most changes were more for simplification and more effective communication. I tried not to lead the jury in terms of ideology. 

2) Regarding #16, I think that there is a zero percent chance that after the "scrutiny of policies" review, the status quo would reign. BYU isn't going to go through all of this so publicly and talk about "transformative and historic changes" without . . . transformative and historic changes. 

I did have to think more about #21 (honor and dress code), and this is a tough one to word. I don't think my presupposition is in error, though. "Cultural competence and sensitivity" with regards to honor and dress code denote --- if you pin people down and get them to admit it --- means "as applied to non-white students." There has already been a loosening with facial hair, hair length, etc., and I don't think this is addressing letting white women wear shorter skirts or shorts, or white men wear sleeveless shirts. Like with my #13 comment in my last post, it doesn't sound good if you simply say this, so euphemism is used. Of course this application of "cultural competence and sensitivity" is going to entail intent and targeting (or conscious lack of targeting). That's what "cultural competence and sensitivity" means in this context.

3) Regarding #22: Yes, "best practices" is a buzzword I leave on the cutting room floor, no matter where it's used. :) The whole thing after "best practices" was a wordy mess, that just meant what I shortened it to. As an aside: the insertion of "and intellectual" is interesting. BYU's faculty has become more liberal over the decades, but it's hard to envision hard-core woke faculty at BYU. This is a separate issue from the race issue, and the only mention in these action steps.

4) I disagree about changing the whole intent with #23. What is the route to academia for aspiring non-white students? That would be graduate school, right? This item is about finding and helping them get into and succeed in grad school. What is the purpose and end goal of mentoring? Success in . . . making it to grad school (so that they can enter academia). 

 

Thank you for the demonstration. Without turning this into a project of its own, I think it important to retain the full original meaning while seeking to simplify with less wordiness, specificity and detail. They have a media relations and social media manager on the committee, and I’m suggesting this was considered along the way. Maybe this is simplified... for a university president!

It is also  interesting to me that your edits reflected the way you think implementation works rather than how the recommendations were proposed to be implemented.

Edited by CV75
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2 minutes ago, CV75 said:

Thank you for the demonstration. Without turning this into a project of its own, I think it important to retain the full original meaning while seeking to simplify with less wordiness, specificity and detail. They have a media relations and social media manager on the committee, and I’m suggesting this was considered along the way. Maybe this is simplified... for a university president!

I don't think the full original meaning was always clearly communicated in the original, the way it was written. Do you? Even with PR and social media experts advising them (my sister is a PR professional. She was PRSSA President when she was at BYU, in fact, under Dr. Laurie Wilson). My sister would say that the wording on this publicly-released version was terrible. 

In some instances (already discussed above), I think that the original meaning was purposely obfuscated and disguised, with euphemism, buzzwords, and jargon, because the frank, simple meaning doesn't sound good at all. 

6 minutes ago, CV75 said:

t is also  interesting to me that your edits reflected the way you think implementation works rather than how the recommendations were proposed to be implemented.

I certainly did focus more on implementation than a "list of suggestions model." One could claim ignorance, of course ("well, these are just recommendations. None of them have actually been implemented . . ."), but I think it's a certainty that the vast majority of them will, indeed, be carried out as written in the original that was released. The criticism and protests alone if they aren't all but assure that. No one is going to release such a detailed 26 step plan like that if they aren't already mostly certain of being implemented. So, my focus in the simplified version treated them like the action steps that they are.  

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9 hours ago, Calm said:

Are you suggesting there is only one culture or what?

I believe the term "BIPOC" seems to reflect there only being two options, "White", and "Other than White"  I believe there are many cultures and experiences and that using the term "BIPOC" is an attempt to be lazy and group everyone into one culture that doesn't meet the definition of "White".  It is kind of insulting to many of them  (At least that is what I get from talking to the "BIPOC" people I associate with.

 

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26 minutes ago, Danzo said:

I believe the term "BIPOC" seems to reflect there only being two options, "White", and "Other than White"  I believe there are many cultures and experiences and that using the term "BIPOC" is an attempt to be lazy and group everyone into one culture that doesn't meet the definition of "White".  It is kind of insulting to many of them  (At least that is what I get from talking to the "BIPOC" people I associate with.

 

That might be the important part here. Myself and many that I also know definitely do not feel that way. 
 

with luv, 

BD 

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2 hours ago, rongo said:

I don't think the full original meaning was always clearly communicated in the original, the way it was written. Do you? Even with PR and social media experts advising them (my sister is a PR professional. She was PRSSA President when she was at BYU, in fact, under Dr. Laurie Wilson). My sister would say that the wording on this publicly-released version was terrible. 

In some instances (already discussed above), I think that the original meaning was purposely obfuscated and disguised, with euphemism, buzzwords, and jargon, because the frank, simple meaning doesn't sound good at all. 

I certainly did focus more on implementation than a "list of suggestions model." One could claim ignorance, of course ("well, these are just recommendations. None of them have actually been implemented . . ."), but I think it's a certainty that the vast majority of them will, indeed, be carried out as written in the original that was released. The criticism and protests alone if they aren't all but assure that. No one is going to release such a detailed 26 step plan like that if they aren't already mostly certain of being implemented. So, my focus in the simplified version treated them like the action steps that they are.  

RE: "full meaning" -- If your shortened renditions did not retain the original meaning ( Posted 3 hours ago ), and you “think that the original meaning was purposely obfuscated and disguised,” do you have a sense of the original meaning, or just a feeling of mistrust?

I’ve noticed all sorts of anecdotes on this thread as to why people are critical of the document, but they don’t stand up to the intel from the survey that the document content is based on. That is why my friendly challenge was how to word it in less triggering ways. You did a little, substituting a few words here and there, but then you explain how the subject matter is still triggering. The concerns don't seem to be over matters of style after all.

RE: "implementation" -- You focused on implementation in a certain way, as not having much of a process (explained later in a resigning tone), when transparent, participative approaches, such as in the original, are crucial when big change is afoot. 

Do you see this report, in practical terms, to be the instigator between two opposing ideologies, or as a good-faith step toward positive change?

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