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President Nelson Receives Covid Vaccine


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4 hours ago, pogi said:

In searching for a quote from President Nelson supporting masks, I cam across this talk by Elder Cook.

Ohhhh. So close.

I mean it has words, even some of the right words - just in a very wrong order.

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Son works at an ALF. Covid Vaccine is mandatory; he got his first yesterday. One, maybe 3 employees are quitting rather than be vaccinated.

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3 hours ago, Calm said:

Calgary was bad enough for me

One of the places where one can get frost bite , snow blindness , wind burn , and sunburn all in the same day .ūüė≤

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1 minute ago, strappinglad said:

One of the places where one can get frost bite , snow blindness , wind burn , and sunburn all in the same day .ūüė≤

Yes!  You are making me homesick.

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10 hours ago, Rain said:

I felt much the way you did about it. Then one health care provider mentioned that even if my children maintain their morals that does not mean their spouse will have done so or will continue to do so.  So after considering that some more we went ahead with the vax.

Very true that your spouse can give it to you if he/she is violating the law of chastity. I had a sister in a previous ward whose husband was disfellowshipped in a different stake for an affair with two women in that ward. She had to have a hysterectomy (or maybe just the cervix, I don't remember exactly) because of cervical cancer that he gave her via HPV. She was very bitter about it, which I empathize with. They were still married when I left them, but it wouldn't surprise me if they are now divorced.

Hypothetical risks aside, we feel that it's best for our kids not to get the Gardasil vaccine. It is something we've prayed about. They have the required vaccines to attend school/college/mission. 

We also have never gotten a flu shot. We were trying to remember, and can't remember the last time I was sick. When I started teaching 19 years ago, I got everything, and got it bad. Pneumonia several times (my wife, too). But, it seems that my immune system (and by extension, my family's) has been strengthened by repeated and constant calibration and defense against the pathogens it/they face. I wonder if the obsessiveness about hygiene resulting from this will have a net weakening effect on immune systems. I know that Triclosan (which was the "antibacterial" in everything a few years ago) has been eliminated because of concerns about that. We wash our hands when we get home from somewhere, or after we use the bathroom, but we aren't hand-sanitzing zillions of times a day like many others. If you're not touching your face, picking your nose/teeth, etc. you should be good. Several in our family have eczema, too, so I can't imagine washing and sanitizing all day long. Their hands would be hamburger. 

I think our general position on vaccines as a family is a) get the ones required to participate in society, and b) we don't see a need to get every vaccine produced for optional things, like flu and HPV. We really hope Covid doesn't join the ranks of "required to participate in society." If Covid is made a seasonal shot, like the flu, but not required, forget it. :) 

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17 hours ago, pogi said:

Except that vitamin D is hardly absorbed through supplementation.  The best way to make it bioavailable is to get it as Rongo suggests - "sunshine".  That is entirely free and wont be wasted in your urine.  

What's your definition of "hardly absorbed"? Because there appear to be several studies that show  supplements are more-than-hardly absorbed, depending on the delivery method.

Quote

According to our data, amounts of vitamin D3 increased in the blood serum of all treated animal groups in proportion to time, during vitamin supplementation, until the 7th day (Figure 3). As early as after 3 days of supplementation, microencapsulated and oil-based vitamin D3 increased vitamin levels in the blood by almost three times: The control level of vitamin D3 in the rat serum ranged from 36.49 ¬Ī 4.12 to 40.5 ¬Ī 3.05 nmol/L, meanwhile in the microencapsulated and oil-based treatment groups it got up to 143.35 ¬Ī 14.72 and 150.85 ¬Ī 35.77 nmol/L, respectively. The highest vitamin D3 concentration in the rat blood serum was registered in the oil-based vitamin D3 group on day 7‚ÄĒthe tested vitamin concentration reached 198.93 ¬Ī 51.6 nmol/L. Comparing the duration of the effect of all vitamin vehicles, microencapsulated SmartHit IV‚ĄĘ supplementation vitamin D3 concentrations in the blood serum remained constant for the longest time (up to the 14th day).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6631968/

 

Also...

Quote

Vitamin D supplementation significantly increased the serum 25(OH)D levels in both groups. Miscible form of vitamin D3 appears to be better in achieving higher levels of serum 25(OH)D than that observed with a similar dose of fat-soluble vitamin D3. Further studies with different dose regimens are required to establish its efficacy over the conventionally used fat-soluble vitamin D3.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27849624/

 

Quote

Subjects in both the groups had a significant increase in their serum 25(OH)D levels following [Vitamin D] supplementation.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30898175/

 


 

Edited by cinepro
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11 hours ago, Chum said:

Son works at an ALF. Covid Vaccine is mandatory; he got his first yesterday. One, maybe 3 employees are quitting rather than be vaccinated.

Wow. The world is a crazier place than I imagined.

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49 minutes ago, cinepro said:

What's your definition of "hardly absorbed"? Because there is at least one study that would appear to show that supplements are more-than-hardly absorbed, depending on the delivery method.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6631968/

I was using "hardly" in a relative way.  Sure, you can get your needed vitamin D through supplementation and diet, but it is more easily bioavailable from sunshine (and cheaper!). 

Quote

Furthermore when vitamin D3 is produced in the skin 100% of it is potentially bound to the vitamin D binding protein (Fig. 17). When vitamin D3 is ingested from the diet or supplement it gets incorporated into chylomicrons which are transported into the lymphatic system and then into the venous system were approximately 60% of the vitamin D3 is bound to the vitamin D binding protein and 40% is rapidly cleared in the lipoprotein bound fraction.29

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3897598/

And it lasts longer in your system too:

Quote

Vitamin D produced in the skin may last at least twice as long in the blood compared with ingested vitamin D.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356951/

The benefit of ingesting/supplementing vitamin D, however, is that sunshine poses its own risks.  
 

Edited by pogi
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2 hours ago, rongo said:

Very true that your spouse can give it to you if he/she is violating the law of chastity. I had a sister in a previous ward whose husband was disfellowshipped in a different stake for an affair with two women in that ward. She had to have a hysterectomy (or maybe just the cervix, I don't remember exactly) because of cervical cancer that he gave her via HPV. She was very bitter about it, which I empathize with. They were still married when I left them, but it wouldn't surprise me if they are now divorced.

Hypothetical risks aside, we feel that it's best for our kids not to get the Gardasil vaccine. It is something we've prayed about. They have the required vaccines to attend school/college/mission. 

We also have never gotten a flu shot. We were trying to remember, and can't remember the last time I was sick. When I started teaching 19 years ago, I got everything, and got it bad. Pneumonia several times (my wife, too). But, it seems that my immune system (and by extension, my family's) has been strengthened by repeated and constant calibration and defense against the pathogens it/they face. I wonder if the obsessiveness about hygiene resulting from this will have a net weakening effect on immune systems. I know that Triclosan (which was the "antibacterial" in everything a few years ago) has been eliminated because of concerns about that. We wash our hands when we get home from somewhere, or after we use the bathroom, but we aren't hand-sanitzing zillions of times a day like many others. If you're not touching your face, picking your nose/teeth, etc. you should be good. Several in our family have eczema, too, so I can't imagine washing and sanitizing all day long. Their hands would be hamburger. 

I think our general position on vaccines as a family is a) get the ones required to participate in society, and b) we don't see a need to get every vaccine produced for optional things, like flu and HPV. We really hope Covid doesn't join the ranks of "required to participate in society." If Covid is made a seasonal shot, like the flu, but not required, forget it. :) 

Yes, I agree with letting families choose on the HPV.

I do get a fly shot every year, but my situation if different.  We are not a germaphobes by any measure, but do keep clean.  I got rid of antibacterial soap long ago when they started talking about the problems with it. We rarely use hand sanitizer and just wash our hands appropriately. But I have had diabetes for over 40 years.  I had preeclampsia badly with all 3 of my kids and my kidneys and liver were shutting down and have never been normal since.  I don't heal quickly and usually when I get sick it lasts longer for me than others in the family and  it really does something with my blood sugar.  And my husband has a lot of lung scaring from pneumonias several times and heart problems since birth.  

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55 minutes ago, Rain said:

Yes, I agree with letting families choose on the HPV.

I do get a flu shot every year, but my situation if different.  We are not a germaphobes by any measure, but do keep clean.  I got rid of antibacterial soap long ago when they started talking about the problems with it. We rarely use hand sanitizer and just wash our hands appropriately. But I have had diabetes for over 40 years.  I had preeclampsia badly with all 3 of my kids and my kidneys and liver were shutting down and have never been normal since.  I don't heal quickly and usually when I get sick it lasts longer for me than others in the family and  it really does something with my blood sugar.  And my husband has a lot of lung scaring from pneumonias several times and heart problems since birth.  

I definitely think a flu shot in your situations is a good idea. 

I'd almost rather get the flu as a "calibration." I literally haven't had the flu for years. I know that I'm in contact with it, but I don't get the fever, aches, cough, etc. I've never been a "stomach-sick" person (which I'm grateful for --- that's really not fun). When I get sick, I just get the flu aches and feel lousy. 

All of our kids were really sick back in February for like three weeks. My son and daughter were in Newsies, and it was "tech week," so they had mandatory rehearsals with a lot of stress because the curtain went up in a few days. We went through many bottles of cough syrup, and we had to manage their fevers. We were debating going to the doctor, because back long ago when I had pneumonia a few times, the doctor told me if a cough lasts longer than ten days, it's not getting better on its own. I even gave my son permission to "die" in a classroom at the Church after seminary (with the seminary teacher's permission) and skip school so he could ready himself for tech week rehearsals (two full run throughs with makeup and costumes and the stage crew, until 10:00-11:00 PM). They were so sick, but they had irreplaceable roles, so they had to tough it out. 

I didn't even get sick then, and we had like 1/3 absenteeism in school classes back in February. There was something really nasty going around then. 

Edited by rongo
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2 minutes ago, rongo said:

All of our kids were really sick back in February for like three weeks. My son and daughter were in Newsies, and it was "tech week," so they had mandatory rehearsals with a lot of stress because the curtain went up in a few days. We went through many bottles of cough syrup, and we had to manage their fevers. I even gave him permission to "die" in a classroom at the Church after seminary and skip school so he could ready himself for tech week rehearsals (two full run throughs with makeup and costumes and the stage crew, until 10:00-11:00 PM). They were so sick, but they had irreplaceable roles, so they had to tough it out. 

I was just thinking --- do you think that "toughing it out" while sick is a thing of the past now? Are people going to freak out because they are shell-shocked because of this past year if someone tries to work, perform, or play while sick? Will people in "irreplaceable" roles be tempted to not say anything and put on a good front so people don't get mad or scared? I wonder if many people are so accustomed to cancelled performances, seasons, etc. from this year that they will be conditioned to do so easily in the future "out of an abundance of caution." 

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1 hour ago, rongo said:

I was just thinking --- do you think that "toughing it out" while sick is a thing of the past now? 

In public health it never was a thing.  We have always encouraged people to quarantine and not work if they are sick.  Most work places have encouraged the same for a long time.  This pandemic has certainly put a huge exclamation point after that long-held but not always well followed recommendation (and sound practice).

I hope it does have a long-term effect, actually.  Before the pandemic, my kids were getting sick nearly every week because parents would send their snotty nosed coughing kids to nursery and preschool and not think twice.  Then it would go through the whole home.  My family hasn't been sick since Covid started (except for Covid -likely- in early April).  I welcome it!   

 

Edited by pogi
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3 minutes ago, pogi said:

In public health it never was a thing.  We have always encouraged people to quarantine and not work if they are sick.  Most work places have encouraged the same for a long time.  This pandemic has certainly put a huge exclamation point after that long-held but not always well followed recommendation (and sound practice).

I hope it does have a long-term effect, actually.  Before the pandemic, my kids were getting sick every week it seems like because parents would send their snotty nosed coughing kids to nursery and preschool and not think twice.  Then it would go through the whole home.  My kid and family hasn't been sick all year (except for Covid -likely- in early April).  I welcome it!   

 

As long as there are hourly workers without paid sick time people will continue to tough it out and even lie about how sick they are.  For many missed work isn't an option regardless of community pressure.

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14 minutes ago, JLHPROF said:

As long as there are hourly workers without paid sick time people will continue to tough it out and even lie about how sick they are.  For many missed work isn't an option regardless of community pressure.

It is a sad truth.  I hope this pandemic has some effect on corporate policies and treatment of their employees while sick.  I know that several companies that we have worked with have done a 90 degree turn around with their policies after experiencing crippling outbreaks in the workplace.  Lesson learned! 

Edited by pogi
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1 hour ago, pogi said:

In public health it never was a thing.  We have always encouraged people to quarantine and not work if they are sick.  Most work places have encouraged the same for a long time.  This pandemic has certainly put a huge exclamation point after that long-held but not always well followed recommendation (and sound practice).

I hope it does have a long-term effect, actually.  Before the pandemic, my kids were getting sick nearly every week because parents would send their snotty nosed coughing kids to nursery and preschool and not think twice.  Then it would go through the whole home.  My family hasn't been sick since Covid started (except for Covid -likely- in early April).  I welcome it!   

I don't think it squares with reality for most people, though. If you have a lead role (or even if it's not a lead role), and it's a live performance, they can't keep rescheduling the show until every single cast member isn't sick. It's now or never. Or, if you have an important game (or, even just a "regular" game for most people), you're going to play in it. I don't think it's realistic to expect games to be indefinitely postponed, rescheduled, or cancelled because of a fever. 

As far as work, there is a big drop-off between me, "live in concert," and a substitute. :) I really like my job, and don't want to miss because I'm feeling under the weather. I haven't felt sick for years, but I did miss two days last year with a kidney stone (that ended up taking 13 days to pass. That wasn't fun when it was time for another ketorolac). If I have flu aches or a fever, it's far less work for me to tough it out at work than prepare for a sub. I know that sounds selfish and heartless to some, especially in this Covid year, but I think this is a reality for many people, not just me. It isn't just about hourly wage jobs without sick time. 

My current employer pays a bonus for unused sick days, too. :) But, unused sick days don't roll over. In my old district, they do, and I had months banked (some teachers retired with a year or two of pay from unused time). In my sister's district in suburban Chicago, **you** pay for your sub (it comes out of your pay), which encourages you only to miss when absolutely necessary and unavoidable. There are a lot of workplace policies that are designed to discourage absenteeism. 

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1 hour ago, rongo said:

I don't think it squares with reality for most people, though. If you have a lead role (or even if it's not a lead role), and it's a live performance, they can't keep rescheduling the show until every single cast member isn't sick. It's now or never. Or, if you have an important game (or, even just a "regular" game for most people), you're going to play in it. I don't think it's realistic to expect games to be indefinitely postponed, rescheduled, or cancelled because of a fever. 

I wouldn't say "most".  Thespianism probably isn't as big a thing as you think :)  I know from experience that most people are capable of staying home when they are sick without disrupting things too much. 

I do understand that people are going to do what they are going to do though.  I don't think Covid is going to change that - it clearly hasn't.  I can't tell yo how many people I have talked to who go to work, school, social outing, etc. despite the fact that they are symptomatic and can't smell or taste!  It is ridiculous.  They don't require the excuse of being a lead role most of the time.   I think Covid has made a dent in that attitude, but clearly not enough. 

Edited by pogi
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