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President Nelson Receives Covid Vaccine


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I hope it does, though Pres. Nelson's advocating for vaccines in general has had no impact on the anti-vaxxer members that I'm aware of.  I would guess that there are plenty of members mad that he is trying to get people to be vaccinated.

Edited by bluebell
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https://www.facebook.com/russell.m.nelson/photos/a.607086232692150/3650726764994733

140662158_3650726768328066_3960547276767521913_o.jpg?_nc_cat=1&ccb=2&_nc_sid=730e14&_nc_ohc=kV-47T_SYH8AX_wwNI-&_nc_ht=scontent-den4-1.xx&oh=d6a40fd7c804f3e9eaa18a73daa79f1f&oe=602CDB82

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With approval from our physician, my wife, Wendy, and I were vaccinated today against COVID-19. We are very grateful. This was the first week either of us was eligible to receive the vaccine. We are thankful for the countless doctors, scientists, researchers, manufacturers, government leaders, and others who have performed the grueling work required to make this vaccine available. We have prayed often for this literal godsend.

As a former surgeon and medical researcher, I know something of the effort needed to accomplish such a remarkable feat. Producing a safe, effective vaccine in less than a year is nothing short of miraculous. I was a young surgeon when, in 1953, Dr. Jonas Salk announced that he had developed a vaccine against the cruel and crippling disease of polio. I then watched the dramatic impact that vaccine had on eradicating polio as most people around the world were vaccinated.

For generations, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has donated considerable resources to making vaccinations available for people in developing countries. Vaccinations have helped to eliminate diseases such as diphtheria and smallpox. My professional and ecclesiastical experiences convince me that vaccinations administered by competent medical professionals protect health and preserve life.

Receiving the vaccine today was part of our personal efforts to be good global citizens in helping to eliminate COVID-19 from the world.

 

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18 minutes ago, Raingirl said:

I’m disturbed by the number of comments by members on social media who are criticizing President Nelson and stating that they’re not going to get the vaccine, and posting all kinds of false information. 

Ugh, that is disheartening. 

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1 hour ago, bluebell said:

It's a good question.  It sounds like they are going to trust those who are telling them what they want to hear.

But why do they want to hear that is my question. 

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2 hours ago, pogi said:

I am curious if this helps ease the minds of any who may have been hesitant about the vaccine previously.  Are there any here that would like to share where they stand?  

My family and I are not anti-vaxxers (we serve missions and attend school, including college, after all, so we have to have up-to-date vaccines), but we will not be getting the Covid vaccine. We all had it starting on December 21st, for one thing. My wife and the two boys at home completely lost their taste and smell, and it was fun experimenting with that. They couldn't taste or smell anything, not even cut onions. I had a bad outbreak of hives, which is a more rare possible symptom, I came to learn. My daughter had no symptoms whatsover. My wife and the boys had no symptoms other than the loss of taste and smell (which returned). We knew we had it based on this, but I ended up taking my wife to the ER for something unrelated (I had posted about that elsewhere). The contact tracing from the ER (unsurprisingly, she was positive) didn't come back until almost three weeks later, by which time everyone was completely better (including restoration of taste and smell).

So, we have the natural equivalent of the vaccine, anyway. Since no one knows how long the vaccines last yet, anyway, it's probably that natural exposure immunity lasts at least as long, right? 

42 minutes ago, Calm said:

But why do they want to hear that is my question. 

I think most people who don't want a vaccine are relying in large part on their own personal experience, and the experience of their extended network of acquaintances. At the same time that our family got it, our ward, stake, town, and larger area was also getting it in spades. No one we personally know or have even heard of, second or third-hand, has had it bad. We know that it can be bad for some, and that it's a real thing, but experientially, there is no urgency in vaccinating. It was fascinating how it ripped through our ward and extended family in a 2-3 week period. We were all getting it at the same time. 

In short, many people's personal and 2nd/3rd hand experience doesn't support hysteria, even with news reports, public service announcements, etc. It's pretty hard to overcome that. 

Our son told us that the 23 deaths from the Pfizer vaccine are a really hot topic in Norway. He said that the lockdown of a few weeks ago is history, at least above the Arctic Circle where he is. People are much more hesitant to have the vaccine there, as you might imagine. 

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32 minutes ago, Calm said:

But why do they want to hear that is my question. 

I think it is because it easier/more efficient, especially when they are stressed (depressed, anxious, etc.) and unconsciously stick with biases (the biases themselves often unconscious) that have protected them in the past. Epiphanies often don't come until we are at the end of our rope, at rock-bottom, have failed in some major way, etc. which most people avoid at all costs, even through denial. People who have been in survival or compensatory mode most of their lives are probably more susceptible to hearing what they want to hear and fearing betrayal.

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41 minutes ago, Calm said:

But why do they want to hear that is my question. 

I don't want to speak for anyone but from my perspective it's a few things that boil down to one thing--control. 

First, faith needs to be more important than science because that means they are in control of physical outcomes (they have control over their faith but none over science, which makes them feel out of control).

Second,  everything that is needed for health is available to them personally and intimately, which again means they can control it to an extent. 

Third, Their faith and everything that they have at their personal disposal (essential oils, energy healings, etc. ) means that they are in control of their health and the health of everyone they love.  Everything is curable and there are no medical conditions that can't be fixed (something science cannot promise but something that provides a sense of control again).

I think that a lot of people who go this route do so because they've been let down by the medical establishment in the past (especially people who have chronic conditions that are difficult to treat or even get a doctor to understand) and they are looking for some relief.  But that relief if found then becomes almost dogmatic.  It's more than medical help it's ideological.

And, it seems like the people that go this route to the extreme are also easily taken in by conspiracy theories and "the evils of Big Pharma" is a big conspiracy theory a lot of people are very invested in.

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16 minutes ago, rongo said:

My family and I are not anti-vaxxers (we serve missions and attend school, including college, after all, so we have to have up-to-date vaccines), but we will not be getting the Covid vaccine. We all had it starting on December 21st, for one thing. My wife and the two boys at home completely lost their taste and smell, and it was fun experimenting with that. They couldn't taste or smell anything, not even cut onions. I had a bad outbreak of hives, which is a more rare possible symptom, I came to learn. My daughter had no symptoms whatsover. My wife and the boys had no symptoms other than the loss of taste and smell (which returned). We knew we had it based on this, but I ended up taking my wife to the ER for something unrelated (I had posted about that elsewhere). The contact tracing from the ER (unsurprisingly, she was positive) didn't come back until almost three weeks later, by which time everyone was completely better (including restoration of taste and smell).

So, we have the natural equivalent of the vaccine, anyway. Since no one knows how long the vaccines last yet, anyway, it's probably that natural exposure immunity lasts at least as long, right? 

I think most people who don't want a vaccine are relying in large part on their own personal experience, and the experience of their extended network of acquaintances. At the same time that our family got it, our ward, stake, town, and larger area was also getting it in spades. No one we personally know or have even heard of, second or third-hand, has had it bad. We know that it can be bad for some, and that it's a real thing, but experientially, there is no urgency in vaccinating. It was fascinating how it ripped through our ward and extended family in a 2-3 week period. We were all getting it at the same time. 

In short, many people's personal and 2nd/3rd hand experience doesn't support hysteria, even with news reports, public service announcements, etc. It's pretty hard to overcome that. 

Our son told us that the 23 deaths from the Pfizer vaccine are a really hot topic in Norway. He said that the lockdown of a few weeks ago is history, at least above the Arctic Circle where he is. People are much more hesitant to have the vaccine there, as you might imagine. 

Please check with your health department -- it would probably be recommended you get vaccinated if for nothing else to level out the variability in your personal immune response (ETA: It is not known how long individual natural immunity lasts). You seem young enough to have to wait in the queue a bit longer, anyway.

One reason to get a vaccine for something that doesn't seem all that deadly is that it might still protect those (even if relatively few) who are at a much higher risk than you or those in your customary circle. For the relatively short time it takes, it can save a life or two. ETA: This is not because it prevents you from sharing virus, but by preventing or reducing your own symptoms, you reduce the volume of exposure you contribute.

Edited by CV75
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1 minute ago, strappinglad said:

Meanwhile, in my area , the vaccine has stopped coming as Pfizer is remodeling their factory. I don't expect to see a vaccine until August+

Certainly a lot of bumps in the road!

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1 hour ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I have a family member who lives in America and married a crazy Latter-day Saint woman there. Just a few minutes ago, she literally posted on Facebook that the vaccine will make women infertile and also contains software allowing the Department of Defence and Bill Gates (I told you she's crazy!) to track recipients for at least two years.

I commented on the post by sharing Pres Nelson's post. Her immediate response: 'I know. It makes me so sad'.

So yeah, some minds simply can't be changed.

ETA: I now see that one of her sources of 'information' has just been arrested in connection with the recent riot at the US Capitol.

Note to myself: There are far worse things than being single ...

Yeah, I have a group on FB with a bunch of preggo ladies from when I was preggo and it was rife with misinformation. It was astounding, even though I know there were a disproportionate number who were vax-skeptical on a good day, it was still crazy to me. One lady said she’d gotten sick with severe covid, was hospitalized, got pneumonia and was STILL more leery about the vaccine. 

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6 hours ago, Raingirl said:

I’m disturbed by the number of comments by members on social media who are criticizing President Nelson and stating that they’re not going to get the vaccine, and posting all kinds of false information. 

He’s the prophet and a physician. If someone is not going to trust him , who are they going to trust?

Probably a failed businessman or reality TV host or something stupid like that.

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2 minutes ago, The Nehor said:

Probably a failed businessman or reality TV host or something stupid like that.

I wish it were that simple! The Capitol rioter that my family member's crazy wife is following right now holds degrees in medicine and law ... :rolleyes:

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