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Is it possible to resist correcting incorrect grammar?


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53 minutes ago, bluebell said:

I've noticed that if I read something out loud that I'll catch errors much more easily than if i try to proofread in my head.  My brain will automatically correct mistakes to make the passage understandable without me realizing it, probably because it knows what I'm trying to say and it doesn't need everything perfect to make it make sense. 

My tongue, on the other hand, will almost always trip up on mistakes, which then causes my brain to take note so I can fix them.

I do that all the time on blog posts, family newsletters etc.  I rarely do that with message board posts - especially now that I am never alone at home.  It's not that O am hiding those.   I just don't want to have to explain it every time! Then again, usually they just don't matter enough for me to do it. 

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21 minutes ago, Rain said:

I do that all the time on blog posts, family newsletters etc.  I rarely do that with message board posts - especially now that I am never alone at home.  It's not that O am hiding those.   I just don't want to have to explain it every time! Then again, usually they just don't matter enough for me to do it. 

Yeah, the bolded is me.  I don't bother with message board posts.  I do my best and let people sift the mistakes out themselves if they are willing.

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3 minutes ago, bluebell said:

Yeah, the bolded is me.  I don't bother with message board posts.  I do my best and let people sift the mistakes out themselves if they are willing.

I correct things if I quote somebody in the quote box, so that the mistake doesn't show up again and possibly embarrass them. But I would never directly point it out to them or anyone else. I taught English for ten years, and notice it, but don't care about it in an informal setting like a message board or social media. It doesn't reflect on one's intelligence or the strength of their logic (my mother and wife are terrible spellers, and they are among the smartest people I know. Spelling is something you either have the knack for or you don't). And people's grammar is almost never bad enough to be distracting, so the occasional grammar mistakes we all make --- who cares? 

I learned English grammar by learning German (who/whom, direct and indirect objects, subjects, etc.). We actually say a lot of technically incorrect things in English because the mistakes are common usage now, so we should continue to say them wrong or people will think we're wrong when we say it correctly. :) Example: "It's me" is wrong; it should be "It is I," but that sounds wrong now because we've been getting it wrong for so long. But mistakes like that don't work in German (and most other languages), so learning a foreign language actually makes your English better because you understand grammar at a fundamental level. 

English is a Germanic language with Latin and Greek grammar rules forced on it, because Latin and Greek were regarded as the ideal languages in the Middle Ages. So, we have useless rules, like "no split infinitives." English teachers in the 60s wanted Star Trek to change it to "Boldly to go . . .," but "to boldly go . . ." actually sounds better, and that's why it stuck. Even though the Elizabethan grammarians decried a split infinitive.

When Hall of Famer Dizzy Dean became a broadcaster for the St. Louis Cardinals when he retired, kids starting imitating his colorful and very wrong grammar they heard on the radio. Teachers in the 50s were horrified, and wanted them to do something about it, because he was leading the kids astray. :) 

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7 minutes ago, rongo said:

I correct things if I quote somebody in the quote box, so that the mistake doesn't show up again and possibly embarrass them. But I would never directly point it out to them or anyone else. I taught English for ten years, and notice it, but don't care about it in an informal setting like a message board or social media. It doesn't reflect on one's intelligence or the strength of their logic (my mother and wife are terrible spellers, and they are among the smartest people I know. Spelling is something you either have the knack for or you don't). And people's grammar is almost never bad enough to be distracting, so the occasional grammar mistakes we all make --- who cares? 

Exactly.  It really doesn't matter.  If I know what they are saying then I'm good with it.

Almost all of my errors are because my fingers are typing faster than my brain is thinking.  So for my fingers it's the wild wild west.  This is especially true for words that I type often, like when my brain is trying to say "if" but my fingers type "I've," because they started with the "i" and said to themselves "Ok, I know where you're going with this..." and ran away on their own.  :lol:

Most of the time I catch that kind of stuff but if I'm typing on my phone (and dealing with the demon that is autocorrect) or I'm in a hurry and don't re-read my post before sending, it can get pretty messy.

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1 hour ago, rongo said:

I correct things if I quote somebody in the quote box, so that the mistake doesn't show up again and possibly embarrass them.

I do this as well, though years of tough English teachers plus (I believe) a board rule about not changing other people's quotes, means I put my changes in brackets to indicate that it isn't the original author's direct quote. 

However, since the board doesn't let us edit the html code directly, I sometimes have to use parenthesis for this instead of brackets - otherwise it will read a bracketed letter (e.g., s, i, or b) as being an opening html style tag and then the rest of the quote - along with my reply - ends up being stricken, italicized, or bolded. Usually pretty easy to catch, but kind of annoying still. 

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1 hour ago, bluebell said:

Exactly.  It really doesn't matter.  If I know what they are saying then I'm good with it.

That is the key.  Do people know what someone said? If yes, then no need to say anything about a grammar or spelling mistake. 

If, however, you can't understand what they are trying to communicate then it is ok to say something. I find though rather than pointing out mistakes, it makes for better conversation to say something like, "I don't know what you are saying here.  Would you word it differently please?"

1 hour ago, bluebell said:

Almost all of my errors are because my fingers are typing faster than my brain is thinking.  So for my fingers it's the wild wild west.  This is especially true for words that I type often, like when my brain is trying to say "if" but my fingers type "I've," because they started with the "i" and said to themselves "Ok, I know where you're going with this..." and ran away on their own.  :lol:

Most of the time I catch that kind of stuff but if I'm typing on my phone (and dealing with the demon that is autocorrect) or I'm in a hurry and don't re-read my post before sending, it can get pretty messy.

 

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42 minutes ago, Amulek said:

I do this as well, though years of tough English teachers plus (I believe) a board rule about not changing other people's quotes, means I put my changes in brackets to indicate that it isn't the original author's direct quote. 

However, since the board doesn't let us edit the html code directly, I sometimes have to use parenthesis for this instead of brackets - otherwise it will read a bracketed letter (e.g., s, i, or b) as being an opening html style tag and then the rest of the quote - along with my reply - ends up being stricken, italicized, or bolded. Usually pretty easy to catch, but kind of annoying still. 

The board used to let us change to an html view and I kind of miss it.

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3 hours ago, bluebell said:

Yeah, the bolded is me.  I don't bother with message board posts.  I do my best and let people sift the mistakes out themselves if they are willing.

The other thing, is that it does indicate educational level, which sometimes matters for determining what "level" of response, from simple to academic, is appropriate.

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1 minute ago, mfbukowski said:

The other thing, is that it does indicate educational level, which sometimes matters for determining what "level" of response, from simple to academic, is appropriate.

It can. 
 

I think it mostly indicates whether or not a person likes to read. If you read a lot, even fiction, then the way language should sound and look becomes a part of you, and not something you have to think about.  
 

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1 hour ago, bluebell said:

It can. 
 

I think it mostly indicates whether or not a person likes to read. If you read a lot, even fiction, then the way language should sound and look becomes a part of you, and not something you have to think about.  
 

Or it may also go along with what your skills or strengths are.  My husband is an engineer and has always read a lot.  Spelling has always been a thorn in his side anyway.  He loves grammarly because it really helps him to catch a lot of things he doesn't. 

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1 hour ago, MiserereNobis said:

I have a t-shirt that says "I'm silently correcting your grammar."

I have a t-shirt that simply says "Theiyr're" so I can find out who my true friends are.  Ha!  Just kidding. 

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I've been corrected several times here.  I tend to assume that either the corrector is OCD, that they are trying to make me look foolish, or that they are trying to feel more important than they do.  It usually doesn't bother me because I am a good writer and speller, I'm simply a sloppy typist and I don't care about my errors on a forum like this.  That said, I can see why it would be annoying and distracting to have spelling police always at the ready.

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52 minutes ago, Rain said:

  He loves grammarly because it really helps him to catch a lot of things he doesn't. 

The rest of us hate the Grammarly ads on Youtube. :) They're the only ads I seem to get.

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16 minutes ago, rongo said:

The rest of us hate the Grammarly ads on Youtube. :) They're the only ads I seem to get.

That's odd.  I've never seen one.  I see a lot of Hello Fresh.

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I'm flattered to be the [albeit unnamed] subject of a thread, though I thought personal threads were disallowed.  I suppose it depends on who you are and how selectively the Mods feel like enforcing the rules.  Ah, well!  Don't mind me!  Carry on!

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13 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I'm flattered to be the [albeit unnamed] subject of a thread, though I thought personal threads were disallowed.  I suppose it depends on who you are and how selectively the Mods feel like enforcing the rules.  Ah, well!  Don't mind me!  Carry on!

Lots of posters correct grammar. I’ve probably done it on occasion.

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It's me. It's her. Etc. Objective case in subject complement. Mainstream English. See Quirk et al. 1985, §6.3.

Title page:  "And now if there be fault, it be the mistake of men."
Lancelot Andrewes, Sermons:  "But, if there be no cause, and so it be in vaine,"

 

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20 hours ago, bluebell said:

It can. 
 

I think it mostly indicates whether or not a person likes to read. If you read a lot, even fiction, then the way language should sound and look becomes a part of you, and not something you have to think about.  
 

About which you need not think

🤪😉🥴

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17 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I'm flattered to be the [albeit unnamed] subject of a thread, though I thought personal threads were disallowed.  I suppose it depends on who you are and how selectively the Mods feel like enforcing the rules.  Ah, well!  Don't mind me!  Carry on!

Nah this is mostly about the newspaper guy.

I don't have puppies so I really don't need newspapers anymore

 

 

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On 1/13/2021 at 9:05 AM, AtlanticMike said:

Thank you so much for posting this bluebell.  I hate to admit it this, but I hadn't tried reading post I don't understand outloud. It's funny because sometimes when I write a contract, I'll read it outloud to myself just to make sure it sounds halfway decent. Great advice.

It is.

Also,  suppose your neighbor down the block decides to re- roof his own roof, and did fine on the tear-off, he's down to plywood.

 He starts the 1st course of shingles at the top of the roof, just under the cap

He hasn't finished it yet

 What would you do?

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On 1/12/2021 at 3:17 PM, The Nehor said:

fashion_police_and_grammar_police.png

Love that phrase "deeply arbitrary".

 Reminds me of a few of our discussions hereabouts.

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1 hour ago, mfbukowski said:

About which you need not think

🤪😉🥴

Proper grammar, and the way language should sound, are not always the same thing.  As someone else has already pointed out.  :D 

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