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Praise To The Man!


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Amen. Millions shall know Brother Joseph again. 

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1 hour ago, Kenngo1969 said:

Shhhh!  No one tell Mark Bukowski! :o:blink:

;):D

@mfbukowski

 

It's all over now...

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3 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

Shhhh!  No one tell Mark Bukowski! :o:blink:

;):D

Heathen idolators!  Gather forth the branches and twigs and prepare the great blaze!

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Ah 1, and ah 2, and ah 3... altogether now:

1.  Praise to the man who communed with Jehovah!

Jesus anointed that Prophet and Seer.

Blessed to open the last dispensation,

Kings shall extol him, and nations revere.

[Chorus] Hail to the Prophet, ascended to heaven!

Traitors and tyrants now fight him in vain.

Mingling with Gods, he can plan for his brethren;

Death cannot conquer the hero again.

 

2. Praise to his mem’ry, he died as a martyr;

Honored and blest be his ever great name!

Long shall his blood, which was shed by assassins,

Plead unto heav’n while the earth lauds his fame.

[Chorus]

Hail to the Prophet, ascended to heaven!

Traitors and tyrants now fight him in vain.

Mingling with Gods, he can plan for his brethren;

Death cannot conquer the hero again.

 

3. Great is his glory and endless his priesthood.

Ever and ever the keys he will hold.

Faithful and true, he will enter his kingdom,

Crowned in the midst of the prophets of old.

[Chorus]

Hail to the Prophet, ascended to heaven!

Traitors and tyrants now fight him in vain.

Mingling with Gods, he can plan for his brethren;

Death cannot conquer the hero again.

 

4. Sacrifice brings forth the blessings of heaven;

Earth must atone for the blood of that man.

Wake up the world for the conflict of justice.

Millions shall know “Brother Joseph” again.

[Chorus]

Hail to the Prophet, ascended to heaven!

Traitors and tyrants now fight him in vain.

Mingling with Gods, he can plan for his brethren;

Death cannot conquer the hero again.

https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/music/library/hymns/praise-to-the-man?lang=eng

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On 12/23/2020 at 8:51 PM, Kenngo1969 said:

Shhhh!  No one tell Mark Bukowski! :o:blink:

;):D

 

On 12/24/2020 at 1:26 AM, mfbukowski said:

Heathen idolators!  Gather forth the branches and twigs and prepare the great blaze!

I especially like the part that says, “Mingling with Gods, he can plan for his brethren.”  
 

It reminds me that, consistent with Christ’s intercessory prayer that we be one with God and Christ, we should all one day be “mingling with Gods.”

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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On 12/24/2020 at 5:53 PM, Kenngo1969 said:

 

This is fabulous. 

I’ve never sung, nor I believe even heard, this hymn before, but I’m old enough to remember when it was in the old (pre-1985) hymn book. ‘Twould  be nice to see it restored to our collective consciousness as part of the next hymn book revision.  
 

 

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6 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

This is fabulous. 

I’ve never sung, nor I believe even heard, this hymn before, but I’m old enough to remember when it was in the old (pre-1985) hymn book. ‘Twould  be nice to see it restored to our collective consciousness as part of the next hymn book revision.  
 

 

I agree.  I'm not sure what the odds of that happening are, though. :huh:  I'm just hoping they don't take out Praise to the Man. :unknw: 

Edited by Kenngo1969
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21 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

I agree.  I'm not sure what the odds of that happening are, though. :huh:  I'm just hoping they don't take out Praise to the Man. :unknw: 

With us just finishing up the year of “Hear Him,” the bicentennial of the First Vision, I perceive that appreciation for Joseph and his mission is as high as ever. I don’t believe that those who grump about it are going to hold sway.

 

And that translates into continued popularity of this hymn of the Restoration. Not so long ago, it was selected as the title track for an album by the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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Praise to the Man was written shortly after Smith's death by William W. Phelps who had just been reunited with the Church after a falling out and Joseph forgave him of what he had done.

Interesting change that was made to Phelp's original song. Part of the original text of the second verse said:
"Long shall his blood, which was shed by assassins,  Stain Illinois, while the earth lauds his fame."

In 1927, the LDS Church officially changed the words "Stain Illinois" to "Plead unto heav'n".

 

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Compare the hym  "Praise to the man"  to the Hym  "He could of called ten thousand Angels"  ...... I know which one brother Joseph would of wanted the Saints to sing.....

 

They bound the hands of Jesus in the garden where he prayed

They led him thru the streets in shame

They spat upon the savior so pure and free from sin

They said, "crucify him: he's to blame

 

He could have called ten thousand angels

To destroy the world and set him free

He could have called ten thousand angels

But he died alone, for you and me

 

Upon his precious head they placed a crown of thorns

They laughed and said, "Behold the king"

They struck him and they cursed him and mocked his holy name

All alone he suffered everything

 

When they nailed him to the cross, his mother stood nearby,

He said, "Woman, behold thy son!"

He cried, "I thirst for water," but they gave him none to drink

Then the sinful work of man was done

 

To the howling mob he yielded: he did not for mercy cry

The cross of shame he took alone

And when he cried, "It’s finished," he gave himself to die

Salvation's wondrous plan was done

 

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55 minutes ago, mac7 said:

 

Compare the hym  "Praise to the man"  to the Hym  "He could of called ten thousand Angels"  ...... I know which one brother Joseph would of wanted the Saints to sing.....

 

They bound the hands of Jesus in the garden where he prayed

They led him thru the streets in shame

They spat upon the savior so pure and free from sin

They said, "crucify him: he's to blame

 

He could have called ten thousand angels

To destroy the world and set him free

He could have called ten thousand angels

But he died alone, for you and me

 

Upon his precious head they placed a crown of thorns

They laughed and said, "Behold the king"

They struck him and they cursed him and mocked his holy name

All alone he suffered everything

 

When they nailed him to the cross, his mother stood nearby,

He said, "Woman, behold thy son!"

He cried, "I thirst for water," but they gave him none to drink

Then the sinful work of man was done

 

To the howling mob he yielded: he did not for mercy cry

The cross of shame he took alone

And when he cried, "It’s finished," he gave himself to die

Salvation's wondrous plan was done

 

Agree, and welcome.  Upvote, except you's a newbie! ;)

 

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1 hour ago, JAHS said:

Praise to the Man was written shortly after Smith's death by William W. Phelps who had just been reunited with the Church after a falling out and Joseph forgave him of what he had done.

Interesting change that was made to Phelp's original song. Part of the original text of the second verse said:
"Long shall his blood, which was shed by assassins,  Stain Illinois, while the earth lauds his fame."

In 1927, the LDS Church officially changed the words "Stain Illinois" to "Plead unto heav'n".

 

Several hymns have been tweaked in the hymnbook over the years.

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3 hours ago, mac7 said:

 

Compare the hym  "Praise to the man"  to the Hym  [sic] "He could of [sic] called ten thousand Angels"  ...... I know which one brother Joseph would of [sic] wanted the Saints to sing.....

 

 

@mac7 

"Of" =/= "Have."

Just sayin'!

And perhaps you should ponder whether you presume to know entirely too much.  Using that logic, should we throw out We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet, as well?  (I don't have a reference, but one recent prophet said he thought of his predecessors in the role each time the song was sung.)  As has been pointed out, Joseph Smith had every reason to tell W.W. Phelps, the author of Praise to the Man, to take a long walk off of a short pier (preferably while wearing heavy boots) when the latter sought reconciliation with him, yet he didn't do so.  Certainly, Brother Phelps had every reason to extol Brother Joseph's magnanimity.  Any member of the Church of Jesus Christ with a reasonably well functioning brain ought to know that Joseph Smith, or any other leader of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) is of value to members of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) only insofar as he leads the members of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) to Jesus Christ

As for this work that you are absolutely convinced should be part of the hymnody of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, it's a pity that Brother Joseph's prophetic gifts failed him so completely that he wasn't able to persuade Emma to include the song in the original hymnbook of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, even though, apparently, it wasn't even written until about 140 years after that first collection of Latter-day Saint hymns was published.  And if Praise to the Man upsets you, Doctrine and Covenants 135 (which is a part of our canon, for goodness' sake!) ought to send you to the absolute heights of apoplexy! :shok: :blink: :huh: 

Edited by Kenngo1969
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On 12/26/2020 at 12:28 PM, mac7 said:

 

Compare the hym  "Praise to the man"  to the Hym  "He could of called ten thousand Angels"  ...... I know which one brother Joseph would of wanted the Saints to sing.....

 

They bound the hands of Jesus in the garden where he prayed

They led him thru the streets in shame

They spat upon the savior so pure and free from sin

They said, "crucify him: he's to blame

 

He could have called ten thousand angels

To destroy the world and set him free

He could have called ten thousand angels

But he died alone, for you and me

 

Upon his precious head they placed a crown of thorns

They laughed and said, "Behold the king"

They struck him and they cursed him and mocked his holy name

All alone he suffered everything

 

When they nailed him to the cross, his mother stood nearby,

He said, "Woman, behold thy son!"

He cried, "I thirst for water," but they gave him none to drink

Then the sinful work of man was done

 

To the howling mob he yielded: he did not for mercy cry

The cross of shame he took alone

And when he cried, "It’s finished," he gave himself to die

Salvation's wondrous plan was done

 

I disagree with your conjecture about Joseph’s preference regarding the hymn, but since he is not here for us to ask him about it, I think it pointless for either of us to speculate about it.  
 

By the way, “would of” (a pet peeve of mine) is not proper English and is not appropriate for use in place of the phrase “would have” or the contraction “would’ve”. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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15 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

@mac7 

"Of" =/= "Have."

Just sayin'!

And perhaps you should ponder whether you presume to know entirely too much.  Using that logic, should we throw out We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet, as well?  (I don't have a reference, but one recent prophet said he thought of his predecessors in the role each time the song was sung.)  As has been pointed out, Joseph Smith had every reason to tell W.W. Phelps, the author of Praise to the Man, to take a long walk off of a short pier (preferably while wearing heavy boots) when the latter sought reconciliation with him, yet he didn't do so.  Certainly, Brother Phelps had every reason to extol Brother Joseph's magnanimity.  Any member of the Church of Jesus Christ with a reasonably well functioning brain ought to know that Joseph Smith, or any other leader of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) is of value to members of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) only insofar as he leads the members of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) to Jesus Christ

As for this work that you are absolutely convinced should be part of the hymnody of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, it's a pity that Brother Joseph's prophetic gifts failed him so completely that he wasn't able to persuade Emma to include the song in the original hymnbook of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, even though, apparently, it wasn't even written until about 140 years after that first collection of Latter-day Saint hymns was published.  And if Praise to the Man upsets you, Doctrine and Covenants 135 (which is a part of our canon, for goodness' sake!) ought to send you to the absolute heights of apoplexy! :shok: :blink: :huh: 

Yes, I heard President Ezra Taft Benson say that on more than one occasion about “We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet.”

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15 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

@mac7 

"Of" =/= "Have."

Just sayin'!

And perhaps you should ponder whether you presume to know entirely too much.  Using that logic, should we throw out We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet, as well?  (I don't have a reference, but one recent prophet said he thought of his predecessors in the role each time the song was sung.)  As has been pointed out, Joseph Smith had every reason to tell W.W. Phelps, the author of Praise to the Man, to take a long walk off of a short pier (preferably while wearing heavy boots) when the latter sought reconciliation with him, yet he didn't do so.  Certainly, Brother Phelps had every reason to extol Brother Joseph's magnanimity.  Any member of the Church of Jesus Christ with a reasonably well functioning brain ought to know that Joseph Smith, or any other leader of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) is of value to members of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) only insofar as he leads the members of the Church of Jesus Christ (see what I did there? ;)) to Jesus Christ

As for this work that you are absolutely convinced should be part of the hymnody of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, it's a pity that Brother Joseph's prophetic gifts failed him so completely that he wasn't able to persuade Emma to include the song in the original hymnbook of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, even though, apparently, it wasn't even written until about 140 years after that first collection of Latter-day Saint hymns was published.  And if Praise to the Man upsets you, Doctrine and Covenants 135 (which is a part of our canon, for goodness' sake!) ought to send you to the absolute heights of apoplexy! :shok: :blink: :huh: 

Since the angel Moroni told Joseph directly that his (Joseph’s) name would be “both good and evil spoken of” widely in the latter days, and since Joseph was the instrument by which the Book of Mormon was divinely translated, and since that book of scripture contains a prophecy pertaining to Joseph Smith Jr. to the effect that the Lord God would in the latter days raise up a prophet who was “great like unto Moses,” I hardly think Joseph Smith would find it startling or awkward that among the perennially favorite hymns of the Latter-day Saints would be one that paid homage to him. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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4 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

By the way, “would of” (a pet peeve of mine) is not proper English and is not appropriate for use in place of the phrase “would have” or the contraction “would’ve”. 

My faith is restored!

I was waiting for that

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On 12/26/2020 at 11:58 AM, JAHS said:

Praise to the Man was written shortly after Smith's death by William W. Phelps who had just been reunited with the Church after a falling out and Joseph forgave him of what he had done.

Interesting change that was made to Phelp's original song. Part of the original text of the second verse said:
"Long shall his blood, which was shed by assassins,  Stain Illinois, while the earth lauds his fame."

In 1927, the LDS Church officially changed the words "Stain Illinois" to "Plead unto heav'n".

 

The passage of time has a way of erasing stains. 

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3 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:
On 12/26/2020 at 10:58 AM, JAHS said:

Praise to the Man was written shortly after Smith's death by William W. Phelps who had just been reunited with the Church after a falling out and Joseph forgave him of what he had done.

Interesting change that was made to Phelp's original song. Part of the original text of the second verse said:
"Long shall his blood, which was shed by assassins,  Stain Illinois, while the earth lauds his fame."

In 1927, the LDS Church officially changed the words "Stain Illinois" to "Plead unto heav'n".

 

Expand  

The passage of time has a way of erasing stains. 

Yep. Besides that the State of Illinois apologized to the Church for what they did.

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