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On 10/16/2020 at 7:14 AM, stemelbow said:

Are we going to go in circles again?  I'm asking you to help by identifying those things.  

Okay, I'll make a mental note that you have asked for my help when I see you don't correctly see or hear or understand something.  Not that I'll always be around to help you, but I will do what I can when I can.

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On 10/9/2020 at 5:43 PM, rodheadlee said:

Well I was thinking of the oil as the Holy Spirit. So perhaps I'm wrong. No charity = no Holy Spirit = no oil.

We must be careful not to "spiritualize" the text beyond the context, its intended audience and thus intended meaning. Remember, the Gospel (the word of God) is FOR us but it was NOT written TO us. So, we have to strive to hear/see/understand the scripture as if we were standing there, in time and place when those words were spoken. The Savior said that "...five of them were foolish and five of them were prudent..." It speak of preparedness, readiness (for the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand) in these uncertain times. He was trying to illustrate a very specific point. Taking the parable beyond those boundaries is not sound theology.

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On 10/15/2020 at 12:20 PM, stemelbow said:

Thanks for the comments, kind lady.  I was under the impression everyone was in agreement with all the scholarship that shows that the virgins were to all merry the bridegroom.  It was tradition, as it were, for grooms to go pick up the bride at night time.  I suppose it doesn't matter much although I"d question whether it really makes sense otherwise (why would they follow the customs of marriage in their day waiting for the groom?)  And it seems to take away the depth of commitment believers are supposed to have, comparing such to a  marriage.  But, again I don't really feel concerned either way.  

I'm not sure why you insist I haven't understood the parable.  I haven't seen anything that shows I don't understand it.  But if you insist I don't understand it, then so be it.  I find it problematic, as I described...but its hardly the only scriptural teaching I find problematic.  

I'm sorry, if I was making wrong assumptions, I'm probably missing something. 

Anyway, I found this commentary on the parable of the 10 virgins; to me, this is the message of the parable and what Jesus was trying to convey to his disciples.  It is a message is watch, pray, and be prepared, cause it's possible for even those who believe in Christ and his gospel to find themselves not prepared at his coming.  Others find different messages in the Parable, but I think this is the basic one.

 

https://www.jesusfilm.org/blog-and-stories/parable-ten-virgins.html

From the article: 

Quote

The listeners would be familiar with the background of this parable. The bride and her bridesmaids would wait at the bride's home for the groom to arrive. This usually occurred after dark, and there would be a long procession of dancing and celebration that led to the main event.

For some reason, the groom was running late, and the wedding procession fell asleep. When the herald announced at midnight that the groom was on his way, it caught many of the bridesmaids unaware. They discovered that they didn't have enough oil to keep their small lamps burning. So they asked the more prudent bridesmaids to borrow some of theirs, but the wiser women didn't want to run out of oil, too.

So the unprepared bridesmaids were sent to purchase more oil. While they were gone, the groom arrived, and the wedding procession was forced to go on with five bridesmaids instead of 10. This would have been a considerable embarrassment to the wedding party.

Typically, everyone in the village would have been invited to the wedding feast. But Jesus tells us that they barred the door and refused entrance to the foolish virgins. In fact, the groom denies that he even knows them. 

 

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2 hours ago, alter idem said:

Typically, everyone in the village would have been invited to the wedding feast. But Jesus tells us that they barred the door and refused entrance to the foolish virgins. In fact, the groom denies that he even knows them. 

This is one of the parts of the traditional interpretation of the parable that I struggle with.  The groom is late, but he has no compassion for those who are later than him.  That doesn't seem to be an example that we should follow.

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20 hours ago, ksfisher said:

This is one of the parts of the traditional interpretation of the parable that I struggle with.  The groom is late, but he has no compassion for those who are later than him.  That doesn't seem to be an example that we should follow.

To me, this is the problem with trying to dissect parables down to the tiny parts.  When you do that, they can muddy the meaning or lesson Jesus was teaching.  The theme of the parable isn't about the groom being later than expected.  It isn't about the other virgins not sharing their oil.  Those are simply a necessary part of the story, in order to get the true meaning of the story.  

Also, if you take the parable in it's basic form, we are to assume the groom genuinely doesn't know them or recognize them as part of his wedding party-- they are strangers; he's not punishing them for being late, he's just not letting them in because he doesn't recognize them to be any of his invited guests.  I believe Jesus didn't want us to get distracted over whether the groom is being a jerk, or whether the virgins were jerks for not sharing their oil, their behavior was not meant to be taken as examples of how we should treat others as that's not what he was teaching in this parable.  If you want that kind of a lesson, he taught the parable of the Good Samaritan--it's pretty straightforward. 

To me, this shows the dangers in trying to make inferences about the details of the story(missing the forest for the trees); the lesson Jesus was trying to teach is sometimes obscured or lost when doing that, and that was what was important.  Maybe that is part of what Jesus meant by 'those who have ears to hear'.   Having the intended message lost is an example of the intended message or lesson not being received. 

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