Jump to content

Critical Race Theory


Storm Rider

Recommended Posts

I continue to try and understand what is happening and why it is happening in our society at this present time. I firmly believe that very few movements are born at a moment's notice or after a terrible event. Rather, movements are the result of previous actions, scholarship, and direct activity of usually small groups.

I was listening to a speaker today, a woman from Somalia named Ayaan Hirsi Ali. She is a Feminist, Human Rights activist, and research fellow at the Hoover Institute. The topic was the USA and systemic racism. She disagrees with this specific proposition, while still condemning individual events of racists. She brought up Critical Race Theory and how it is being used to divide the nation and cause separation between the races and the destruction of society.  

In researching this some more I found an article from Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy that was critical of the theory. I have not finished the article having only read the first fifteen pages or so. The pages are quite short and fully documented. The author states, 

"Its successes notwithstanding, in one important respect CRT has not yet been taken seriously. Over the course of the last eight years, the period of its greatest flowering, CRATs have mounted a relentless attack upon mainstream institutions. But while their charges have elicited an occasional response, there has been, until very recently, almost no broad-based evaluation of CRT during the 1990s from outside the movement. Are CRATs right? To the extent that they are, their message needs to be heard rather than evaded. To the extent not, CRATs need to be challenged. A systematic and comprehensive public review of CRT is overdue. This article-by an author unwedded to both traditional and Postmodernist legal scholarship - is offered as a contribution to such a review."

If there is going to be progress on this topic on race, then there must exist the ability to talk openly and frankly. I found this article helpful in adding a few stepping stones to understanding the logic of the Left on race and posing worthwhile questions. 

I will not highlight the article - my perception and interpretation are unworthy and without much merit on this topic. I offer the article simply as a worthwhile read that does not take too much time. 

Link to comment
8 hours ago, Storm Rider said:

.......................................

I was listening to a speaker today, a woman from Somalia named Ayaan Hirsi Ali. ................ She brought up Critical Race Theory and how it is being used to divide the nation and cause separation between the races and the destruction of society.  ...........................

Yes, Ayaan Hirsi Ali has a profound understanding of this issue, and has paid a high price for it.  The neo-Marxists and admirers of Mao's Cultural Revolution are now throwing Dr Martin Luther King Jr and John Lewis (and Frederick Douglass) under the bus in favor of violence and destruction.  According to them, nothing has been accomplished and there is no justice.  Nada.

A more interesting and accurate POV is expressed by a number of African-Americans,

 

Edited by Robert F. Smith
Link to comment

Black Lives Matter is a movement that is frequently targeted by people creating misinformation. For those interested in understanding Black Lives Matter from the source, here is their belief statement:

Quote

 

Four years ago, what is now known as the Black Lives Matter Global Network began to organize. It started out as a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission was to build local power and to intervene when violence was inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.

In the years since, we’ve committed to struggling together and to imagining and creating a world free of anti-Blackness, where every Black person has the social, economic, and political power to thrive.

Black Lives Matter began as a call to action in response to state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Our intention from the very beginning was to connect Black people from all over the world who have a shared desire for justice to act together in their communities. The impetus for that commitment was, and still is, the rampant and deliberate violence inflicted on us by the state.

Enraged by the death of Trayvon Martin and the subsequent acquittal of his killer, George Zimmerman, and inspired by the 31-day takeover of the Florida State Capitol by POWER U and the Dream Defenders, we took to the streets. A year later, we set out together on the Black Lives Matter Freedom Ride to Ferguson, in search of justice for Mike Brown and all of those who have been torn apart by state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Forever changed, we returned home and began building the infrastructure for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, which, even in its infancy, has become a political home for many.

Ferguson helped to catalyze a movement to which we’ve all helped give life. Organizers who call this network home have ousted anti-Black politicians, won critical legislation to benefit Black lives, and changed the terms of the debate on Blackness around the world. Through movement and relationship building, we have also helped catalyze other movements and shifted culture with an eye toward the dangerous impacts of anti-Blackness.

These are the results of our collective efforts.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network is as powerful as it is because of our membership, our partners, our supporters, our staff, and you. Our continued commitment to liberation for all Black people means we are continuing the work of our ancestors and fighting for our collective freedom because it is our duty.

Every day, we recommit to healing ourselves and each other, and to co-creating alongside comrades, allies, and family a culture where each person feels seen, heard, and supported.

We acknowledge, respect, and celebrate differences and commonalities.

We work vigorously for freedom and justice for Black people and, by extension, all people.

We intentionally build and nurture a beloved community that is bonded together through a beautiful struggle that is restorative, not depleting.

We are unapologetically Black in our positioning. In affirming that Black Lives Matter, we need not qualify our position. To love and desire freedom and justice for ourselves is a prerequisite for wanting the same for others.

We see ourselves as part of the global Black family, and we are aware of the different ways we are impacted or privileged as Black people who exist in different parts of the world.

We are guided by the fact that all Black lives matter, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status, or location.

We make space for transgender brothers and sisters to participate and lead.

We are self-reflexive and do the work required to dismantle cisgender privilege and uplift Black trans folk, especially Black trans women who continue to be disproportionately impacted by trans-antagonistic violence.

We build a space that affirms Black women and is free from sexism, misogyny, and environments in which men are centered.

We practice empathy. We engage comrades with the intent to learn about and connect with their contexts.

We make our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We dismantle the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” so that they can mother in private even as they participate in public justice work.

We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

We cultivate an intergenerational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, show up with the capacity to lead and learn.

We embody and practice justice, liberation, and peace in our engagements with one another.

 

Systemic racism is insidious and it negatively impacts Black Americans now.

The most obvious argument can help create understanding for the less obvious. This is one way I look at it: centuries of enslavement harmed Black Americans, and when slavery was abolished, the freed people were not compensated for their suffering nor for the loss of life caused by slavery. This lack of institutional repentance on the part of the United States of America has had lasting impact on the generations of Black Americans that followed. As LDS who believe that the loss of scripture can result in generational physical suffering and misery, this point can be accessible to our understandings.

Yet that is not all. After the abolition of slavery when compensation was denied freed Americans who had been enslaved, opponents of compensation invented arguments to justify that lack of compensation. They published opinions like "no one should get something for nothing" as the formerly enslaved died by the thousands without proper food, shelter, and medical care. These excuses mimicked the racism invented by slavers and slavery-supporters who made arguments like "the Negro race is barbaric and therefore destined to be subservient to Whites." This is why I think that racism is perhaps principally an outgrowth of economic injustice. People are being ill-treated for economic gain of others, and when the treatment is most especially offensive to the human conscience, human beings will create philosophies to justify their selfish actions.

This type of mental work to rationalize behavior is described by many and it is explored in detail by Jonathan Haidt in his book "The Righteous Mind." He describes our emotional side and ensuing rationalisations as like an elephant and a rider. We as human beings often act out of emotion but then use our minds to think of reasons for what we did. My dad read "Leadership and Self-Deception" by the Arbinger Institute when I was a child and he loved it so much that he eventually bought family and extended family members copies and he taught us about it extensively. From the website for the book:

Quote

 When trapped in self-deception, we live and work as if trapped in a box. We can’t see the reality around us—we’re blind to the self-serving motivations that are sabotaging us on the job and at home.

In other words, the insidious impact of slavery and the lack of institutional repentance for it is more than economic, it has been impacting American minds ever since. That impact results in a cycle of discrimination and racist rationalizations. And even though this impact is more cerebral and spiritual, as LDS who believe that the loss of scripture can result in generational spiritual suffering and misery, this point can also be accessible to our understandings.

Edited by Meadowchik
Link to comment
1 hour ago, Meadowchik said:

Black Lives Matter is a movement that is frequently targeted by people creating misinformation. For those interested in understanding Black Lives Matter from the source, here is their belief statement:

Systemic racism is insidious and it negatively impacts Black Americans now.

BLM is a highly racist and violent movement dedicated to throwing the Constitution under the bus, along with deep contempt for all of our great civil rights leaders, past and present.  The solution to inequities in our society (there will always be problems and inequities) must be based on the rule of law, and upon strong support for family values.

1 hour ago, Meadowchik said:

................................ Jonathan Haidt ................................

Try reading Jonathan Haidt & Greg Lukianoff, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure (Penguin, 2018).  – fear of microaggressions and the love of woke identity politics taught in elite universities will not save our civilization, but will quickly destroy it.  Read their article on this in the Atlantic, at https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/09/the-coddling-of-the-american-mind/399356/ .

Link to comment
31 minutes ago, Robert F. Smith said:

BLM is a highly racist and violent movement dedicated to throwing the Constitution under the bus, along with deep contempt for all of our great civil rights leaders, past and present.  The solution to inequities in our society (there will always be problems and inequities) must be based on the rule of law, and upon strong support for family values.

Try reading Jonathan Haidt & Greg Lukianoff, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure (Penguin, 2018).  – fear of microaggressions and the love of woke identity politics taught in elite universities will not save our civilization, but will quickly destroy it.  Read their article on this in the Atlantic, at https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/09/the-coddling-of-the-american-mind/399356/ .

 You could try to engage BLM's own statement about itself, or my own commentary about systemic racism. And we might also identify the common ground and work from there.

Link to comment
13 minutes ago, Meadowchik said:

 You could try to engage BLM's own statement about itself, or my own commentary about systemic racism. And we might also identify the common ground and work from there.

BLM has proven its actual program through thuggery, rioting, vandalism, and looting (which they justify in Chicago as reparations).  We just buried Congressman John Lewis, whose life stands in full opposition to the BLM program.  BLM actually practices systemic racism.  How is that progress?

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

BLM is a highly racist and violent movement dedicated to throwing the Constitution under the bus, along with deep contempt for all of our great civil rights leaders, past and present.  The solution to inequities in our society (there will always be problems and inequities) must be based on the rule of law, and upon strong support for family values.

Try reading Jonathan Haidt & Greg Lukianoff, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure (Penguin, 2018).  – fear of microaggressions and the love of woke identity politics taught in elite universities will not save our civilization, but will quickly destroy it.  Read their article on this in the Atlantic, at https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/09/the-coddling-of-the-american-mind/399356/ .

Yes, the rule of law has really helped so far. Why wouldn’t they trust the law to protect them and advance their interests? What were these protests about? Not enough of the rule of law.

2 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

BLM has proven its actual program through thuggery, rioting, vandalism, and looting (which they justify in Chicago as reparations).  We just buried Congressman John Lewis, whose life stands in full opposition to the BLM program.  BLM actually practices systemic racism.  How is that progress?

Nope, but it is easy to get that impression if you live in an echo chamber and don’t actually engage with what is actually going on.

Link to comment
2 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

BLM has proven its actual program through thuggery, rioting, vandalism, and looting (which they justify in Chicago as reparations).  We just buried Congressman John Lewis, whose life stands in full opposition to the BLM program.  BLM actually practices systemic racism.  How is that progress?

You present this claim without evidence, while it is contrary to the stated mission of BLM, and while your claim is also contrary to the work I have witnessed by grass-roots BLM activists and supporters. Are you at all concerned about the history of law enforcement discriminating against Black Americans?

Link to comment
9 hours ago, Meadowchik said:

Black Lives Matter is a movement that is frequently targeted by people creating misinformation. For those interested in understanding Black Lives Matter from the source, here is their belief statement:

Systemic racism is insidious and it negatively impacts Black Americans now.

The most obvious argument can help create understanding for the less obvious. This is one way I look at it: centuries of enslavement harmed Black Americans, and when slavery was abolished, the freed people were not compensated for their suffering nor for the loss of life caused by slavery. This lack of institutional repentance on the part of the United States of America has had lasting impact on the generations of Black Americans that followed. As LDS who believe that the loss of scripture can result in generational physical suffering and misery, this point can be accessible to our understandings.

Yet that is not all. After the abolition of slavery when compensation was denied freed Americans who had been enslaved, opponents of compensation invented arguments to justify that lack of compensation. They published opinions like "no one should get something for nothing" as the formerly enslaved died by the thousands without proper food, shelter, and medical care. These excuses mimicked the racism invented by slavers and slavery-supporters who made arguments like "the Negro race is barbaric and therefore destined to be subservient to Whites." This is why I think that racism is perhaps principally an outgrowth of economic injustice. People are being ill-treated for economic gain of others, and when the treatment is most especially offensive to the human conscience, human beings will create philosophies to justify their selfish actions.

This type of mental work to rationalize behavior is described by many and it is explored in detail by Jonathan Haidt in his book "The Righteous Mind." He describes our emotional side and ensuing rationalisations as like an elephant and a rider. We as human beings often act out of emotion but then use our minds to think of reasons for what we did. My dad read "Leadership and Self-Deception" by the Arbinger Institute when I was a child and he loved it so much that he eventually bought family and extended family members copies and he taught us about it extensively. From the website for the book:

In other words, the insidious impact of slavery and the lack of institutional repentance for it is more than economic, it has been impacting American minds ever since. That impact results in a cycle of discrimination and racist rationalizations. And even though this impact is more cerebral and spiritual, as LDS who believe that the loss of scripture can result in generational spiritual suffering and misery, this point can also be accessible to our understandings.

I reject in toto  BLM and its objectives. It has nothing to do with healing race relations; just the opposite. Its goal is to destroy American society and everything it stands for. It is an organization of hate and has nothing positive to add to society, culture, or the betterment of Black people. Its sole objective is to obtain power at whatever cost is necessary to obtain it. 

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Meadowchik said:

You present this claim without evidence, while it is contrary to the stated mission of BLM, and while your claim is also contrary to the work I have witnessed by grass-roots BLM activists and supporters. Are you at all concerned about the history of law enforcement discriminating against Black Americans?

Please explain how more unarmed white men are killed by police than black people and have that explanation continue to support discrimination against Black Americans?

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Meadowchik said:

You present this claim without evidence, while it is contrary to the stated mission of BLM, and while your claim is also contrary to the work I have witnessed by grass-roots BLM activists and supporters. Are you at all concerned about the history of law enforcement discriminating against Black Americans?

Mainstream media does fail to report on the riots, often falsely terming them "peaceful" demonstrations, and ignoring the numerous arrests for extreme violence and vandalism.  I am not at all interested in the written, stated claims of BLM, which are entirely contradicted by their actions.  In case after case, the actual story and hard evidence shows that law enforcement is usually very restrained and careful not to use unnecessary violence when making arrests.  The mainstream media frequently falsely reports these events:

Take the famous 2017 shooting of an unarmed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, for example.  The MSM reported that Brown was an unarmed Black teen shot to death by a white police officer, including the entirely false rumor that he was shot in the back.  The reports made him sound like a little boy of 12 who had done nothing wrong.  In fact, Brown and his buddy had just committed an armed robbery at a small store and Brown had physically assaulted the small owner (CCTV shows the assault).  Brown himself was a fully grown man of 18, stood around 6'3" and weighed around 285 lbs.  Brown was larger than the lone police officer who had received his description over the radio.  That cop had just seen Brown walking down the middle of a street with his buddy, so turned his black & white unit around to go back to investigate.  When the cop found Brown and attempted to investigate, Brown actually assaulted and injured the cop by punching him while the cop was still in the front seat of his patrol car.  They fought for control of the cop's pistol, and seven shots were fired by the cop while wrestling with Brown.  Only one round actually killed Brown, and the autopsy showed that all rounds were fired at very close quarters (within an inch or two) as they wrestled.  The cop was lucky to have survived, and his injuries were recorded at the hospital.  There was not a shred of evidence that the cop had done anything at all wrong, and so he could not be prosecuted.

You might want to pay close attention to the statistics of law enforcement shootings made by knowledgeable black men in the video I cited above.  They are exactly the opposite of the false claims made by BLM..

Link to comment
4 hours ago, The Nehor said:

Yes, the rule of law has really helped so far. Why wouldn’t they trust the law to protect them and advance their interests? What were these protests about? Not enough of the rule of law.

Nope, but it is easy to get that impression if you live in an echo chamber and don’t actually engage with what is actually going on.

I have been preaching the rule of law for many years now.  Most people don't understand what that means, and reject actually using the legal system to obtain justice.  Yet it is by far and away the best and most effective approach.  Riots and looting are more fun, perhaps sexier, but they actually hurt progress.  Shouting and pretending seem so much more satisfying than the really hard work of change in a democratic society.

Link to comment
47 minutes ago, Robert F. Smith said:

armed robbery at a small store

CFR please. I have seen the incident referred to as “strong armed”, but can find nothing that claims he was armed with a weapon. 

Link to comment
2 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

I have been preaching the rule of law for many years now.  Most people don't understand what that means, and reject actually using the legal system to obtain justice.  Yet it is by far and away the best and most effective approach.  Riots and looting are more fun, perhaps sexier, but they actually hurt progress.  Shouting and pretending seem so much more satisfying than the really hard work of change in a democratic society.

It might even work if the legal system were fair and equitable. Telling the disadvantaged they have to create change in a system that is biased against them using only prescribed methods that do not disrupt or challenge anything is saying that the status quo is acceptable.

It is easy to say that others are lazy and not willing to put in the “hard work” when you are not one of those working and seeing no progress. “WORK HARDER!”

Link to comment
48 minutes ago, The Nehor said:

It might even work if the legal system were fair and equitable. Telling the disadvantaged they have to create change in a system that is biased against them using only prescribed methods that do not disrupt or challenge anything is saying that the status quo is acceptable.

It is easy to say that others are lazy and not willing to put in the “hard work” when you are not one of those working and seeing no progress. “WORK HARDER!”

And yet it is precisely those like Martin Luther King Jr and John Lewis who accomplished the most.  How did they do it?  Through completely non-violent protests and marches, negotiation with political figures, important legislation, and legal challenges in the courts.  No looting, no vandalism, no shootings.  I know because I was there and took an active part in the full process.   I was proud of what we were able to do.  And yes, I am contemptuous of those who have no civility and self-discipline, who are now destroying the progress which has been made.  Indeed, they deny that any progress was ever made.  They want to bring a reprise of Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution, which was an all out sabotage of progress.  Pol Pot did the same even more systematically in Kampuchea.  Perhaps you are too young to recall the genocide by the Khmer Rouge.  That is the world being offered to us by ANTIFA and the BLM.  These people want to destroy the rule of law -- which is code for the Constitution.  They hate the Constitution.

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Calm said:

CFR please. I have seen the incident referred to as “strong armed”, but can find nothing that claims he was armed with a weapon. 

Armed robbery does not require a weapon (knife, club, gun, etc.), even though that is a common misconception.  Armed robbery means violence.  Brown actually physically assaulted the small store owner.  It is on camera.

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...