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Locals in Erda, Ut Complain Re: Temple Development, Church Responds....


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36 minutes ago, Tacenda said:

The one I don't like is when people type "prolly" instead of probably. The un's don't bother me too much. In fact I sometimes think I annoy people when I feel the need to pronounce my t's. I live in Layton and don't say Lay-un. 

+1  ! 

Yeah "Prolly" is one I also find a bit annoying.

I remember when I was a kid one of my friends bragged that his family was going to New York City- (all of 350 miles away) and he would get to see the "Entire State Building"

What a difference a couple of consonants can make!

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12 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

The mere existence of the term "glottal stop" indicates that it has been "present for many years". 

Yeah, like since language began being used.

I was talking about ONE instance of a new appearance of the glottal stop in English- and of course that was my opinion.   If you have something relevant to say about that particular recent usage, please respond.

You identified that one instance as being part of “a huge trend in English pronunciation.” If it’s a trend — and a “huge” one at that — it implies a series of relatively late occurrences. That puzzled me, because I’ve been observing glottal stops in English pronunciation — and not just in local or regional speech patterns — since I was very young. It doesn’t strike me as trendy at all. 
 

Another example is pronunciation of the word student. Some folks are very crisp in their pronunciation and say it “STU-dent.“ But it is very common to hear it pronounced with a glottal stop, as in “STU-nt.” 

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4 hours ago, Tacenda said:

The one I don't like is when people type "prolly" instead of probably. The un's don't bother me too much. In fact I sometimes think I annoy people when I feel the need to pronounce my t's. I live in Layton and don't say Lay-un. 

Am I guilty of that?  From time to time, prolly. ;):D

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1 hour ago, Kenngo1969 said:

Am I guilty of that?  From time to time, prolly. ;):D

Or I'm just not savvy that it's a thing. Please correct me if so, haha! 

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4 hours ago, Tacenda said:

Or I'm just not savvy that it's a thing. Please correct me if so, haha! 

Prolly!  :)

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On 8/21/2020 at 6:34 PM, Islander said:

I wonder what happened. Did they not pray over the plans and the proposed  site beforehand. If so, what happened? Did the will of the people overturn the will of the Lord?

Or maybe they prayed, but didn't have enough good information about local feelings.  Leaders have told us good information makes for good inspiration, but it's possible the developers didn't have all the good info needed to give to church leaders to pray about.

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On 8/30/2020 at 9:18 AM, Rain said:

Or maybe they prayed, but didn't have enough good information about local feelings.  Leaders have told us good information makes for good inspiration, but it's possible the developers didn't have all the good info needed to give to church leaders to pray about.

Or maybe the Almighty wanted to give the locals the chance to make the right choice. 
 

This certainly would not be not the first time mortal sentiment has been allowed to interfere with divinely inspired planning. Entire temples have been canceled (or indefinitely postponed) because of mortal opposition. People have their agency. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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On 8/30/2020 at 9:18 AM, Rain said:

Or maybe they prayed, but didn't have enough good information about local feelings.  Leaders have told us good information makes for good inspiration, but it's possible the developers didn't have all the good info needed to give to church leaders to pray about.

I think sometimes the answer is "I trust you to make good decisions.  Go ahead and see what happens." 

The Lord councils us to be "anxiously engaged in a good cause, and do many things of [our] own free will, and bring to pass much righteousness" (D&C 58:27).  I don't see that moving ahead with something and having it not work out means that leaders weren't inspired or that mortals are frustrating the Lord's work.  I think sometimes the Lord gives us opportunities to learn and grow together.  The important thing is that the temple is being build.  Everything else, while perhaps nice, is ancillary. 

I don't think the door is permanently closed on a housing development and there is an upside in that the local residents know that the church is ready and willing to listen to and act on their concerns.

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Part of me thinks, keep the Temple in the location shown in the residential proposal maps, make the needed parking lot; then fence the entire area that was the proposed residential space and use that entire property is a green space, or something similar to New York City Central park type area. 

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2 minutes ago, provoman said:

Part of me thinks, keep the Temple in the location shown in the residential proposal maps, make the needed parking lot; then fence the entire area that was the proposed residential space and use that entire property is a green space, or something similar to New York City Central park type area. 

Where's the money in that? They could have done that near the Salt Lake Temple, but instead it's a mall. I don't mind really, but I really don't see it happening. Your suggestion sounds great though. 

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2 minutes ago, Tacenda said:

Where's the money in that? They could have done that near the Salt Lake Temple, but instead it's a mall. I don't mind really, but I really don't see it happening. Your suggestion sounds great though. 

considering that inland is very likely to built 1 - 2 miles west of the Temple in Erda, personally I would want to use nature to block the view, pollution and noise.

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21 minutes ago, provoman said:

Part of me thinks, keep the Temple in the location shown in the residential proposal maps, make the needed parking lot; then fence the entire area that was the proposed residential space and use that entire property is a green space, or something similar to New York City Central park type area. 

That's not a bad suggestion, but, then, when the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, through its leaders, decides it wants to do something else with its park on land it owns, there will be another huge hue-and-cry! :rolleyes:

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9 hours ago, Tacenda said:

Where's the money in that? They could have done that near the Salt Lake Temple, but instead it's a mall. I don't mind really, but I really don't see it happening. Your suggestion sounds great though. 

Yep, that's the only reason why the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints makes any decisions whatsoever!  (Which, of course, the decision changing course about what to do with the land surrounding the Temple is a perfect illustration of!) <_<:rolleyes:

P.S.:  Not to mention, of course, that your indictment of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints draws an illogical, nonsensical connection between events that occurred 127 years apart. <_<:rolleyes:

Edited by Kenngo1969
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3 hours ago, ksfisher said:

I think sometimes the answer is "I trust you to make good decisions.  Go ahead and see what happens." 

Especially if there is no inherent need for only one way of doing things.  If there are multiple decisions that can lead to good results, why wouldn't God be willing to be flexible and leave it in our hands to decide how we wanted to do things?  I don't see God saying "my way or the highway" unless any other way destroys his plans for us.

If God inspires us to go out and build homes for those in need, does anyone really believe he will include in that inspiration how many floors those homes have or whether they use white or stainless steel kitchen fixtures?  To me, I see God dictating what is surrounding a temple, especially to the level of how many acres per house, to be on par with expecting God to pick out our wallpaper.  And if he didn't do that kind of dictation with the temple surroundings plan, then what is the issue with church leadership changing their mind on how they want to create an appropriate environment?

Edited by Calm
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As a student at BYU, I remember walking into a classroom one afternoon.  Someone had written on the chalkboard

It is a gorgeous and glorious day everywhere except Spanish Fark. There it is Gargous and glarius.  

Utah does have its regional accents. My mother grew up in Provo and as a kid, I was generally confused.  Is it batteries or batres, roof or ruff, wrestling or wrassling.  The last one was especially embarrassing since I was on the high school wrestling team except when I was home.  Then I was on the wrassling team.

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3 minutes ago, california boy said:

... wrestling or wrassling.  The last one was especially embarrassing since I was on the high school wrestling team except when I was home.  Then I was on the wrassling team.

I'm not particularly an aficionado or a follower of rasslin'!  Nevertheless, I must confess that I have developed a new respect for you. ;)

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On 8/19/2020 at 6:33 PM, Bob Crockett said:

I am in awe of the Draper Temple.  One of my favorite peaceful places.  I bicycle up there often. 

You must have a lot of grit to be able to climb those hills. 

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On 9/4/2020 at 12:59 PM, provoman said:

Part of me thinks, keep the Temple in the location shown in the residential proposal maps, make the needed parking lot; then fence the entire area that was the proposed residential space and use that entire property is a green space, or something similar to New York City Central park type area. 

If it’s necessary to preserve and protect the environs surrounding the sacred space of the temple — or if, hypothetically speaking, the intent were to memorialize some key event in Church history — I could rationalize it. Otherwise, I’m not sure I see how creating and permanently maintaining a “green space” the size of a residential development, requiring the attendant expenditure of tithing funds,  serves the mission of the Church. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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On 9/8/2020 at 8:57 AM, Scott Lloyd said:

You must have a lot of grit to be able to climb those hills. 

It is a challenge for many local riders to go up that hill.

There is something surreal about biking past a well-lit temple with a completely empty parking lot.  i have biked through the empty parking lot to contemplate the temple's true meaning.

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20 hours ago, Bob Crockett said:

It is a challenge for many local riders to go up that hill.

There is something surreal about biking past a well-lit temple with a completely empty parking lot.  i have biked through the empty parking lot to contemplate the temple's true meaning.

Several years ago, my eldest son and I took on as a personal challenge a hike from Draper Park all the way up to the temple. I hope that on some level he absorbed the symbolic meaning of our activity. 

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22 hours ago, Bob Crockett said:

It is a challenge for many local riders to go up that hill.

There is something surreal about biking past a well-lit temple with a completely empty parking lot.  i have biked through the empty parking lot to contemplate the temple's true meaning.

That's a good place to do it. :)

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