Jump to content

Covid II: Medical Info and Implications


Recommended Posts

Just now, Tacenda said:

Thanks, I read the rest of what you had to say here. My sister isn't anti mask that I know of don't know about my nephew, guessing he's anti mask along with my son. But it's done now, I posted both articles on the FB thread and if they say anything I will take it like a woman! ;) 

Good woman!  :)  And good luck. 

Link to comment
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Ipod Touch said:

In case anyone is interested:

I received both Pfizer shots in March-Apr.  I caught Covid in late June but my symptoms were very mild.  A bit of a cough and fever that maxed out at 101.  I felt sick for about 2 days but was completely back to normal afterward.

May I be nosy and ask your approximate age…decade is fine. If you don’t want to share, that is okay too. 
 

Should add my brother is late 60s, had Pfizer iirc, he has significant health issues which is likely why his doctor suggested the cocktail when he wasn’t getting better after a week. 

Edited by Calm
Link to comment
18 hours ago, Calm said:

Good woman!  :)  And good luck. 

It went very well yesterday with my sister saying she got the vaccine because they traveled outside of the US and that she's really glad she did now. Win!!

Also, just saw this as a commercial on TV, it's awesome:

 

Link to comment
Posted (edited)

One shot probably shouldn’t be used as a standard of comparison when it is two shots that are required for a full immune response. 

And this is imo even more evidence that people should be getting a vaccine so that stronger variants are less likely to develop.

Fyi for comparison, previous findings were one shot Pfizer was 85% effective after 4 weeks from shot, so over half as effective with this later variant.

https://www.asbmb.org/asbmb-today/science/040421/how-effective-is-the-first-shot-of-the-pfizer-or-m

——

Israel had an early push to get vaccinated, I wonder how much time from vaccine is a factor. 

Edited by Calm
Link to comment
Quote

In recent weeks, the correlate community has been buzzing louder than ever. Scientists are on the cusp of confidently defining some correlates of protection against symptomatic disease for the COVID-19 vaccines. If confirmed, these correlates could revolutionize the way we tackle SARS-CoV-2 immunization: Vaccine makers testing a new inoculation may no longer need to follow tens of thousands of people for many months to test their product’s protection. Instead, they could inject just a few hundred people, snag some drops of blood, and see if the elusive correlate is met. That’s how we tee up new flu vaccines every year without the rigmarole of gargantuan clinical trials…

But the mere possibility of hitting protection pay dirt is reason enough to keep plugging away. Having a strong correlate of protection against COVID-19 would allow researchers around the world to more quickly bring new vaccines to market in countries where they are sorely needed. A correlate would also give scientists the chance to monitor the natural wane of immune responses and deploy boosters that could rapidly buoy those defenses, if need be. It could act as a guidepost for new shots that fight specific variants before they outsmart the jabs we already have.

The need for correlates is so urgent, the FDA has already gambled that antibodies are the answer: In recent guidance, the agency noted that it would consider green-lighting updated, variant-specific versions of vaccines if they’re able to prompt the production of adequate levels of neuts. It’s a hastier move than some researchers would like. But with variants such as Delta surging amid a largely unvaccinated global population, the shortcut offered by these correlates has never been more appealing. The big hope, researchers told me, is that COVID-19 vaccines will be able to follow in the footsteps of flu shots, which are reformulated seasonally to keep pace with the strains du jour. Vaccine makers can debut new vaccines by simply checking inoculated people’s blood for the telltale markers of protection, rather than waiting to see how these individuals fare against the virus itself.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/07/correlates-of-protection-vaccine-immunity/619508/

Interesting article.  The body is so complicated.  Sometimes I wonder how we manage to figure out anything.

Link to comment

https://www.wsj.com/articles/cdc-covid-19-coronavirus-vaccine-side-effects-hospitalization-kids-11626706868

"A tremendous number of government and private policies affecting kids are based on one number: 335. That is how many children under 18 have died with a Covid diagnosis code in their record, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yet the CDC, which has 21,000 employees, hasn’t researched each death to find out whether Covid caused it or if it involved a pre-existing medical condition.

Without these data, the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices decided in May that the benefits of two-dose vaccination outweigh the risks for all kids 12 to 15. I’ve written hundreds of peer-reviewed medical studies, and I can think of no journal editor who would accept the claim that 335 deaths resulted from a virus without data to indicate if the virus was incidental or causal, and without an analysis of relevant risk factors such as obesity.

My research team at Johns Hopkins worked with the nonprofit FAIR Health to analyze approximately 48,000 children under 18 diagnosed with Covid in health-insurance data from April to August 2020. Our report found a mortality rate of zero among children without a pre-existing medical condition such as leukemia. If that trend holds, it has significant implications for healthy kids and whether they need two vaccine doses. The National Education Association has been debating whether to urge schools to require vaccination before returning to school in person. How can they or anyone debate the issue without the right data?

Meanwhile, we’ve already seen inflated Covid death numbers in the U.S. revised downward. Last month Alameda County, Calif., reduced its Covid death toll by 25% after state public-health officials insisted that deaths be attributed to Covid only if the virus was a direct or contributing factor."

Link to comment
On 7/22/2021 at 10:14 AM, Ipod Touch said:

I'm in my mid-50's.  I'm a bit porky and have a couple of other risk factors for serious Covid illness.  So when considering vaccination, I talked to a couple of friends in the medical field and eventually came to the conclusion that getting vaccinated was the best way to reduce my overall risk of serious illness.  And given that my symptoms after catching Covid were pretty mild despite my risk factors, I think I made the right choice.  

You're this guy?

image.png.d99148b7a93cb3cf01e885f4c0260a5e.png

At least you wear pants, don't you? ;):D :rofl: 

(For the record, I'm that guy, too, but I do wear pants ...)

Link to comment
4 hours ago, bsjkki said:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2021/07/23/covid-could-spread-flatulence-say-ministers/

I would not want to be accused of being a super spreader 

 

82625E87-82BD-455E-9E8F-29480B2D8A5E.jpeg

Uh-oh!  You mean, maybe I'm a super-spreader??? :huh: :unsure: :unknw: 

Geez, just when I thought I had enough things to worry about ... :D :rofl: :D 

Link to comment
2 hours ago, bsjkki said:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/cdc-covid-19-coronavirus-vaccine-side-effects-hospitalization-kids-11626706868

"A tremendous number of government and private policies affecting kids are based on one number: 335. That is how many children under 18 have died with a Covid diagnosis code in their record, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yet the CDC, which has 21,000 employees, hasn’t researched each death to find out whether Covid caused it or if it involved a pre-existing medical condition.

Without these data, the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices decided in May that the benefits of two-dose vaccination outweigh the risks for all kids 12 to 15. I’ve written hundreds of peer-reviewed medical studies, and I can think of no journal editor who would accept the claim that 335 deaths resulted from a virus without data to indicate if the virus was incidental or causal, and without an analysis of relevant risk factors such as obesity.

My research team at Johns Hopkins worked with the nonprofit FAIR Health to analyze approximately 48,000 children under 18 diagnosed with Covid in health-insurance data from April to August 2020. Our report found a mortality rate of zero among children without a pre-existing medical condition such as leukemia. If that trend holds, it has significant implications for healthy kids and whether they need two vaccine doses. The National Education Association has been debating whether to urge schools to require vaccination before returning to school in person. How can they or anyone debate the issue without the right data?

Meanwhile, we’ve already seen inflated Covid death numbers in the U.S. revised downward. Last month Alameda County, Calif., reduced its Covid death toll by 25% after state public-health officials insisted that deaths be attributed to Covid only if the virus was a direct or contributing factor."

I would argue that preventing or mitigating the long-term damage possible from a mild or severe Covid case that doesn’t kill the child is still worth the risk even if that data does bear out.

https://medical.mit.edu/covid-19-updates/2021/06/will-kids-have-long-term-effects-covid-19-vaccine

50+ years of a potentially lower quality of life would trump the incredibly small chance the vaccine will have lethal effects or cause long-term damage.

Link to comment

What would the 1% mean out of 100,000 children?  I am assuming the 1% is applied to the infected, so we need that percentage. 

Link to comment
16 minutes ago, bsjkki said:

Too funny not to share. “Finding out Covid can spread via farts takes “silent but deadly” to a whole new level.”

On another chat site some friends and I were joking about that and talking about a recent political figure farting and spreading Covid. Were we……right?

And I know, I have the mentality of a 14 year old.

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...