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Why Are Temples Rededicated After Renovation?


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16 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

After the temple precincts have been sullied or desecrated by the presence of Gentiles, the Jews have a specific ceremony to purify it -- they sacrifice a red heifer, then burn it, and scatter the ashes on the desecrated holy area.  Only then can it be used again for holy sacrificial rites.  Currently, for example, the Temple Mount in Jerusalem is regarded as desecrated, and Orthodox Jews will not set foot in that area.

Interesting. 

How is the western wall different that they go there?  I can think of several possible reasons, but am curious about the actual reason. 

And while we are at it - through all of your posts I have missed this. What is your profession?

Edited by Rain
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2 hours ago, Rain said:

............................How is the western wall different that they go there?  I can think of several possible reasons, but am curious about the actual reason. 

The Western Wall is a Herodian retaining wall for the Temple Mount.  The Temple of Herod was completely destroyed by the Romans, but the retaining wall remains on all four sides of the Temple Mount.  Thus, the Jews who visit the Western Wall (once called the "Wailing Wall"), are fully outside the Temple Mount.  That is as close as they can get to their ancient Temple, and so thousands of them go there regularly to pray.  Many write a note to God and place it in the niches between the Herodian stones -- which weigh from 2 to 5 tons each (the largest weighs around 300 tons).  I recall immediately after the Six-Day War in 1967, tens of thousands of Israelis walking from West Jerusalem to the Old City in order to see that wall.  It was an astonishing sight.  Of course I had seen that wall a year or two before, when it was still part of the Jordanian Old City.  I was there alone with my Arab guide.  It was very lonely.

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And while we are at it - through all of your posts I have missed this. What is your profession?

I am retired and have never really had a profession.  Sometimes I think that I am a Hebraist, or Egyptologist, or anthropologist, or historian.  Other days I am just Christopher Robin having lunch with my boon companion Winnie the Pooh.  🐼

Edited by Robert F. Smith
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16 hours ago, bluebell said:

It sounds like a re-dedication is only needed if the temple was decommissioned when it was remodeled.  

That agrees with my assessment.  When a temple goes through a big renovation or remodeling process it is generally not available for the purpose to which it was originally dedicated. It no longer serves as a house of the Lord for the administration of ordinances and is generally considered just a building, even though some people may still have sentimental attachments to it because they know what the building was used for in the past.  Then, later, after the remodeling/renovation process is completed, the building then becomes re-dedicated as a house of the Lord for his purposes.

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On 6/17/2020 at 2:34 PM, JAHS said:

Can not the original dedication cover whatever happens to the temple? One reason rebaptisms were discontinued is because they were determined to be unnecessary because the original first baptism is all a person needs. 

I don't think the correct wording is "need" to be re-dedicated, versus and opportunity to re-focus on the Lord, for the building, but much much more so for the people it serves.  

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16 hours ago, Rain said:

What is your profession?

Robert is being modest.

He is a notable scholar in the areas about which he speaks.

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