Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rain

Where Can I Find a Conference Report From April 1946?

Recommended Posts

Where can I find a conference report from  April 1946?

Specifically I am looking for the talk by David O McKay.  I don't want the teachings of the Prophets book that quotes it or another source that quotes it.  I want the actual conference report or if it is somehow available the text of the talk itself (if the conference report is a summary and not the text).

Share this post


Link to post

I think they may be in the Gospel Library, I am on my phone and just noticed I didn’t download the app yet as I usually use my iPad for reading. 

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

Rain, link to https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/record?id=b60aeaac-e4ce-45f0-9902-6cd9a27e3306&compId=463f6822-8f2c-43b8-bd79-b996f626750d&view=browse

The Report, as all the others, may have emendations added to the original foolscap and notes taken during and after the talk.  But what is produced is considered "the" word at the time on the subject.

Edited by JamesBYoung
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Clicking the link got me in a survey that appears to be about improving use of the Church History catalog on a phone...just in case anyone wants to give input. I don’t use a phone enough for that site to give any decent feedback. 

Share this post


Link to post
59 minutes ago, Calm said:

I think they may be in the Gospel Library, I am on my phone and just noticed I didn’t download the app yet as I usually use my iPad for reading. 

Gospel library goes back to 1971 for General Conference.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Web archive had a listing for a ldslibrary.com, but that seems to be a defunct website, Gospel Library appeared to be the replacement, but I am guessing not. Don’t remember it ever being called that and likely wouldn’t have a .com address now I think about it. 

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, JamesBYoung said:

Rain, link to https://catalog.churchofjesuschrist.org/record?id=b60aeaac-e4ce-45f0-9902-6cd9a27e3306&compId=463f6822-8f2c-43b8-bd79-b996f626750d&view=browse

The Report, as all the others, may have emendations added to the original foolscap and notes taken during and after the talk.  But what is produced is considered "the" word at the time on the subject.

Thank you!  I need to bookmark this now! 

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Rain said:

Thank you!  I need to bookmark this now! 

You can find almost any and all Journal of Discourses talks and Conference Reports.

The Church History Catalog is fabulous.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, Scott Lloyd said:

There’s a handy app I use called “Scripture Citation Index”. It has all of the conference talks from 1942 to now, as well as the Journal of Discourses.
 

Its primary purpose is to identify where individual scripture passages are cited in all those sermons over the years, but it is good simply as a library of those past conferences. 
 

It is available for free in the App Store and perhaps Google Play (not sure about the latter as I don’t use an Android device). 

Thanks! They do have it for android 

And great discovery is it will be useful and so much easier than the gospel library for another project I have in mind.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Here you go.

also this talk is the reason the presiding officer gets the sacrament first, if you ever wondered why.

 

The Lord's Sacrament

President David O. McKay

Second Counselor in the First Presidency

David O. McKay, Conference Report, April1946, pp. 111-117

When, on one occasion, the Prophet Joseph Smith was asked the meaning of the strength of Zion, he replied:

The strength of Zion is to put on the power of the priesthood  D&C 113:7-8

You, brethren, radiate that strength tonight. No one can be in your presence as the priesthood of the Church filling this building, and representing thousands of others, without feeling heartfelt gratitude for the privilege of being numbered with you. God bless you!

THE SACRAMENT

I desire, tonight, to say a few words regarding the administering of the sacrament. In so doing it is not my purpose to repeat the excellent sermon delivered yesterday by Elder Marion G. Romney on that same subject, but if I may be blessed with the spirit of this gathering and the inspiration of the Lord, I desire to supplement that timely address.

The greatest comfort in this life is the assurance of having close relationship with God. I am speaking to men who know what that experience is. The sacrament period should be a factor in awakening this sense of relationship.

. . . the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread:

And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.

After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.

Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord.

But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread and drink of that cup  1 Cor. 11:23-28

No more sacred ordinance is administered in the Church of Christ than the administration of the sacrament. It was initiated just after Jesus and the Twelve had partaken of the last supper; and the Saints in the early days followed that custom. That is, they ate before they administered the sacrament  1 Cor. 11:20-22but that custom was later discontinued by instructions from Paul to the Saints to eat their meal at home so that when they met for worship they might meet as a body of brethren and sisters on the same level to partake of the sacrament in remembrance of the life and the death, particularly the death of their Lord  1 Cor. 11:33-34

THE PURPOSE OF THE SACRAMENT

There are three things fundamentally important associated with the administration of the sacrament. The first is self-discernment. It is introspection. "This do in remembrance of me"  Luke 22:19 but we should partake worthily, each one examining himself with respect to his worthiness.

Secondly, there is a covenant made; a covenant even more than a promise. You have held up your hand, some of you, or if in England when signing a document, put your hand on the Bible, signifying the value of your promise or of the oath that you took. All this indicates the sacredness of a covenant. There is nothing more important in life than that. Until the nations realize the value of a covenant and promises and conduct themselves accordingly, there will be little trust among them. Instead there will be suspicion, doubt, and signed agreements, "scraps of paper," because they do not value their word. A covenant, a promise, should be as sacred as life. That principle is involved every Sunday when we partake of the sacrament.

Thirdly, there is another blessing, and that is a sense of close relationship with the Lord. There is an opportunity to commune with oneself and to commune with the Lord. We meet in the house that is dedicated to him; we have turned it over to him; we call it his house. Well, you may rest assured that he will be there to inspire us if we come in proper attune to meet him. We are not prepared to meet him if we bring into that room our thoughts regarding our business affairs, and especially if we bring into the house of worship feelings of hatred toward our neighbor, or enmity and jealousy towards the Authorities of the Church. Most certainly no individual can hope to come into communion with the Father if that individual entertain any such feelings. They are so foreign to worship, and so foreign, particularly, to the partaking of the sacrament.

THE VALUE OF MEDITATION

I think we pay too little attention to the value of meditation, a principle of devotion. In our worship there are two elements: One is spiritual communion arising from our own meditation; the other, instruction from others, particularly from those who have authority to guide and instruct us. Of the two, the more profitable introspectively is the meditation. Meditation is the language of the soul. It is defined as "a form of private devotion, or spiritual exercise, consisting in deep, continued reflection on some religious theme." Meditation is a form of prayer. We can say prayers without having any spiritual response. We can say prayers as the unrighteous king in Hamlet who said: "My words fly up, my thoughts remain below: Words without thoughts never to heaven go."

The poet, contrasting the outward form of worship, and the prayer of the soul, said:

The Power incensed, the pageant will desert, 
The pompous strain, the sacerdotal stole; 
But haply, in some cottage far apart,
May hear, well-pleased, the language of the soul, 
And in His Book of Life the inmates poor enroll.

    (Burns, "The Cotter's Saturday Night.")

Meditation is one of the most secret, most sacred doors through which we pass into the presence of the Lord. Jesus set the example for us. As soon as he was baptized and received the Father's approval, "This is my Beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased"  Matt. 3:17 Jesus repaired to what is now known as the mount of temptation. I like to think of it as the mount of meditation where, during the forty days of fasting, he communed with himself and his Father, and contemplated upon the responsibility of his great mission. One result of this spiritual communion was such strength as enabled him to say to the tempter:

Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written. Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve  Matt. 4:10

Before he gave to the Twelve the beautiful sermon on the mount, he was in solitude, in communion. He did the same thing after that busy Sabbath day, when he arose early in the morning, after having been the guest of Peter. Peter undoubtedly found the guest chamber empty, and when they sought him they found him alone. It was on that morning that Peter said:

. . . All men seek for thee  Mark 1:37

Again, after Jesus had fed the five thousand he told the Twelve to dismiss the multitude, but Jesus went to the mountain for solitude. The historian says, "when the evening was come, he was there alone"  Matt. 14:23Meditation! Prayer!

I once read a book written by a very wise man, whose name I cannot now recall, which contained a significant chapter on prayer. The author was not a member of the Church, but evidently had a desire to keep in close communion with God, and he wanted to find the truth. Among other things he said in substance:

In secret prayer go into the room, close the door, pull down the shades, and kneel in the center of the room. For a period of five minutes or so, say nothing. Just think of what God has done for you, of what are your greatest spiritual and temporal needs. When you sense that, and sense his presence, then pour out your soul to him in thanksgiving.

SACRAMENT PERIOD FOR COMMUNION WITH GOD

I believe the short period of administering the sacrament is one of the best opportunities we have for such meditation, and there should be nothing during that sacred period to distract our attention from the purpose of that ordinance.

One of the most impressive services I have ever attended was in a group of over eight hundred people to whom the sacrament was administered, and during that administration not a sound could be heard excepting the ticking of the clock—eight hundred souls, each of whom at least had the opportunity of communion with the Lord. There was no distraction, no orchestra, no singing, no speaking. Each one had an opportunity to search himself introspectively and to consider his worthiness or unworthiness to partake of the sacrament. His was the privilege of getting closer to his Father in heaven. That is ideal!

Brethren, we recommend that we surround this sacred ordinance with more reverence, with perfect order, that each one who comes to the house of God may meditate upon his goodness and silently and prayerfully express appreciation for God's goodness. Let the sacrament hour be one experience of the day in which the worshiper tries at least to realize within himself that it is possible for him to commune with his God.

Great events have happened in this Church because of such communion, because of the responsiveness of the soul to the inspiration of the Almighty. I know it is real. President Wilford Woodruff had that gift to a great extent. He could respond; he knew the "still small voice"  1 Kgs. 19:12 to which some are still strangers. You will find that when these most inspirational moments come to you that you are alone with yourself and your God. They come to you probably when you are facing a great trial, when the wall is across your pathway, and it seems that you are facing an insurmountable obstacle, or when your heart is heavy because of some tragedy in your life. I repeat, the greatest comfort that can come to us in this life is to sense the realization of communion with God.

FATHER'S TESTIMONY

Great testimonies have come in those moments. It is just such an experience as that which came to my father in the north of Scotland when, as I have told some of you before, he prayed to God to remove from him a spirit of gloom and despondency that overwhelmed him. After a night of worry and restlessness, he arose at daylight and repaired to a cave on the shore of the North Sea. He had been there before in prayer. There, just as the rays of the morning light began to come over the sea, he poured out his soul to God as a son would appeal to his father. The answer came: "Testify that Joseph Smith is a prophet of God!" The cause of his discouragement flashing upon his mind, he said aloud: "Lord, it is enough!"

There are those in this audience who knew my father and can testify to his integrity and his honesty. A testimony of that kind has one hundred percent value.

These secret prayers, these conscientious moments in meditation, these yearnings of the soul to reach out to feel the presence of God such is the privilege of those who hold the Melchizedek Priesthood.

ELIMINATION OF DISTRACTING THOUGHTS

Now I know that some of you are saying to yourselves, "music helps to intensify that feeling of communion." When you stop to consider the matter, you realize that there is nothing during the administration of the sacrament of an extraneous nature so important asremembering our Lord and Savior, nothing so worthy of attention as considering the value of the promise we are making. Why should anything distract us? Is there anything more sublime? We are witnessing there, in the presence of one another, and before him, our Father, that we are willing to take upon ourselves the name of Christ, that we will always remember him, always, that we will keep his commandments that he has given us  D&C 20:77,79 Can you, can anybody living, who thinks for a moment, place before us anything which is more sacred or more far-reaching in our lives? If we partake of it mechanically, we are not honest, or let us say, we are permitting our thoughts to be distracted from a very sacred ordinance.

I was speaking recently to one man about this. He said: "Oh, but the beautiful music of the choir helps us to concentrate." Concentrate on what? The more beautiful the music, the more your attention is attracted to it, to the player, or to the composer. If it is beautiful music poorly played, then the discord detracts your attention. Have that music in preparation up to the moment, yes, but when the prayer is said, and that young priest speaks for us, as he does, then remember that we are placing ourselves under covenant. It will be ideal if, during the fifteen minutes, every man, woman, and child will think as best as he or she can of the significance of that sacred ordinance.

There is one other point which might be associated with the passing of the sacrament. It is a beautiful, impressive things to have our boys administer it. They are the servants; they are waiting upon us and waiting upon the Lord  Isa. 40:31 and have come there because they are worthy to officiate if the bishop has spoken to them properly.

. . . be ye clean, that bear the vessels of the Lord  Isa. 52:11

If every boy could sense this, quietly and with dignity he would pass the sacrament to us. Sometimes they pass it first to the organist, as if no moment should be lost before she starts to distract our attention. The music starts at once. No matter how good it may be, the tones of the organ, if we are respectful to the organist, divert our attention from the prayer that has just been offered.

PRESIDING OFFICERS TO RECEIVE SACRAMENT FIRST

Rather should that young man carry the sacrament to the presiding officer, not to honor him, but the office, as you honored our President tonight. That presiding officer may be the bishop of the ward; if so, let the young man carry the sacrament first to the bishop. After that pass it to one after the other who sit either on the left or the right of the presiding officer; not going back to the first and second counselors and then to the superintendent. The lesson is taught when the sacrament is passed to the presiding officer. The next Sunday, the president of the stake may be there, who is then the highest ecclesiastical authority. Do you see what the responsibility of the deacons and the priests is? There is a lesson in government taught every day. It is their duty to know who is the presiding officer in that meeting that day. Next Sunday there may be one of the General Authorities. Those young men will have in mind the question, "Who is he today, and who is the presiding authority?"

COMPANIONSHIP OF HOLY SPIRIT

But the lesson I wish to leave tonight is: Let us make that sacrament hour one of the most impressive means of coming in contact with God's spirit. Let the Holy Ghost, to which we are entitled, lead us into his presence, and may we sense that nearness, and have a prayer offered in our hearts which he will hear.

My thought is partially expressed by Edwin Markham in the following lines:

The builder who first bridged Niagara's gorge,
Before he swung his cable, shore to shore,
Sent out across the gulf his venturing kite
Bearing a slender cord for unseen hands
To grasp upon the further cliff and draw
A greater cord, and then a greater yet;
Till at last across the chasm swung
The cable—then the mighty bridge in air!

So may we send our little timid thought 
Across the void, out to God's reaching hands—
Send our love and faith to thread the deep—
Thought after thought until the little cord 
Has greatened to a chain no chance can break, 
And we are anchored to the infinite!

God help us, brethren, so to live that we may sense the reality, as I bear you my testimony tonight it is real, that we can commune with our Father in heaven, and if we so live to be worthy of the companionship of the Holy Spirit, he will guide us into all truth; he will show us things to come  John 16:13 he will bring all things to our remembrance  John 14:26he will testify of the divinity of the Lord Jesus Christ, as I do tonight, and of the restoration of the gospel, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

Share this post


Link to post
On 5/6/2020 at 1:48 PM, Rain said:

Where can I find a conference report from  April 1946?

Specifically I am looking for the talk by David O McKay.  I don't want the teachings of the Prophets book that quotes it or another source that quotes it.  I want the actual conference report or if it is somehow available the text of the talk itself (if the conference report is a summary and not the text).

Curious to know what your question was.

As far as the reason for the presiding leader receiving the sacrament first- it appears the answer was essentially- "to train the priests to notice who the presiding officer is"

There's got to be a better explanation than THAT!

I always thought it was odd actually.  Usually the idea that the leader is the "servant of all" and therefore should be LAST to receive it.

In feeding the family, one would expect the father to put family first, and if for example, there was less food on the table than the family needed, it should be the father to didn't eat.  It is his responsibility to be the provider, unless there is a good reason he cannot be, and so if he is unable to provide.

As a dad I would never want to be served first because I am the Big Kahuna, and get the biggest piece of meat etc.  And I have actually seen this happen in LDS homes.  It is just weird to me.

I can't imagine Jesus expecting to get the best of something served to all.

Of course I am old fashioned and a horrible person so what do I know? :) 

I suspect I'm going to get some flak on this one!  🤕

 

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, mfbukowski said:

Curious to know what your question was.

I was writing a blog post about "be still" and it includes a few things about meditation. 

I ran across a quote from David O Mckay, but some places showed it was all his quote, some that he also quoted things in the middle of what he said and one even said part of the quote was from Patricia Holland.

Before I put the quote in my post I wanted to make sure who actually said it.

I've started to find this is a big problem with church quotes.  They get attributed to other church leaders. Sometimes the quotes are not even originally said by a church member, but you've got all these memes all over the place attributing them to an apostle or the prophet.  It's become a pet peeve of mine.

Quote

As far as the reason for the presiding leader receiving the sacrament first- it appears the answer was essentially- "to train the priests to notice who the presiding officer is"

There's got to be a better explanation than THAT!

I always thought it was odd actually.  Usually the idea that the leader is the "servant of all" and therefore should be LAST to receive it.

In feeding the family, one would expect the father to put family first, and if for example, there was less food on the table than the family needed, it should be the father to didn't eat.  It is his responsibility to be the provider, unless there is a good reason he cannot be, and so if he is unable to provide.

As a dad I would never want to be served first because I am the Big Kahuna, and get the biggest piece of meat etc.  And I have actually seen this happen in LDS homes.  It is just weird to me.

Don't go to Vanuatu! At least for meals with guests the men eat first, then the women, then the children. 

Quote

I can't imagine Jesus expecting to get the best of something served to all.

Of course I am old fashioned and a horrible person so what do I know? :) 

I suspect I'm going to get some flak on this one!  🤕

 

I'm only going to give you flak about the last 2 lines.  There was nothing in the rest that even phases me.

Edited by Rain
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

example, there was less food on the table than the family needed, it should be the father to didn't eat.  It is his responsibility to be the provider, unless there is a good reason he cannot be, and so if he is unable to provide.

If he is too weak from not having enough to eat, how is that going to help his kids?  Not saying have the kids starve while Dad gets obese, just saying it isn’t necessarily selfish for a parent to put their needs first if it is so they can care for the rest.  I suspect it is more old fashion to put the adults before the children now that there are safety nets for parent less children that wouldn’t have been there in the past. Death of a father usually meant poverty and extreme hardship. 

Edited by Calm

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Rain said:
9 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

Curious to know what your question was.

I was writing a blog post about "be still" and it includes a few things about meditation

Yes, I noticed those lines.

I have been practicing mindfulness meditation for about 35 years, and now the line for me between meditation and prayer really doesn't exist.

And also what you said about the "meme problem" is very true, and it happens everywhere, not just in church stuff.

It is the nature of literature itself, it becomes part of the hive mind, and is seldom about what is "real".

I'm kind of sorry that the word "meme" has been appropriated for the internet "posters" you see. It used to be that a poster was something you hung on a wall, or put up to inform people, and a meme was like a gene, an idea fragment that mutated in meaning, but no longer.

Ironic that "meme" became itself a mutated shadow of its original meaning so quickly 

Anything that gets into the hive mind is instantly subject to mutation!  There is no "reality" immune to the process!

Edited by mfbukowski

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

Yes, I noticed those lines.

I have been practicing mindfulness meditation for about 35 years, and now the line for me between meditation and prayer really doesn't exist. 

I'm sorry. I didn't realize I had originally said something about meditation so maybe I didn't answer your question on what I was looking for.

I have just started a blog that encourages people to also grow while their missionaries are gone on their missions.  I will be giving people "ideas" or goals to work on during that time.

It started when I realized that I personally could be working on something to work on just before my son left and then figured others might like it too. I've since realized that the 18 months or the 2 years gives you good beginning and end deadlines, but others can use the ideas as well.

So this post is about learning to "be still". I gave a reasons why you would want to be mindful and meditate (which is where the quote came in) and few beginning resources for people to learn (mostly about mindfulness). Then I gave ideas of how you can do it while your missionary is gone. 

4 hours ago, mfbukowski said:

And also what you said about the "meme problem" is very true, and it happens everywhere, not just in church stuff.

It is the nature of literature itself, it becomes part of the hive mind, and is seldom about what is "real".

I'm kind of sorry that the word "meme" has been appropriated for the internet "posters" you see. It used to be that a poster was something you hung on a wall, or put up to inform people, and a meme was like a gene, an idea fragment that mutated in meaning, but no longer.

Ironic that "meme" became itself a mutated shadow of its original meaning so quickly 

Anything that gets into the hive mind is instantly subject to mutation!  There is no "reality" immune to the process!

 

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...