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Study: Multiple Sexual Partners Substantially Increases Cancer Risk


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Playing the field could be putting people at much greater risk of being diagnosed with cancer, a study reveals.

Those most likely to be diagnosed are people with ten or more sexual partners throughout their lifetime. And among women, a higher number of sexual partners is also linked to heightened odds of reporting a limiting long term condition, the findings indicate.

Few studies have looked at the potential impact of the number of sexual partners on wider health outcomes, so researchers from Anglia Ruskin University drew on information gathered for the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a nationally representative tracking study of adults aged 50 and above living in England.

Almost 6,000 people with an average age of 64 were asked to rate their own health and report any long standing conditions.

The average age of participants was 64, and almost three out of four were married. Some 28.5 per cent of men said they had had 0-1 sexual partners to date; 29 per cent said they had had 2-4; 20 per cent reported 5-9; while 22 per cent said 10 or more. The equivalent figures for women were: just under 41 per cent; 35.5 per cent; just under 16 per cent; and just under 8 per cent.
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Compared with women who reported 0-1 sexual partners, those who said they had had 10 or more, were 91 per cent more likely to have been diagnosed with cancer.

Among the men, those who reported 2-4 lifetime sexual partners were 57 per cent more likely to have been diagnosed with cancer than were those who reported 0-1. And those who reported 10 or more, were 69 per cent more likely to have been diagnosed with the disease.

While the number of sexual partners was not associated with reported long standing conditions among the men, it was among the women.

The findings chime with those of previous studies, implicating sexually transmitted infections in the development of several types of cancer and hepatitis, suggest the researchers.

I did not know that STIs are thought to be associated with cancer risks.  

I am grateful for the Law of Chastity.  While obedience to the precepts of the Restored Gospel obviously does not guarantee avoidance of all health problems, it sure helps reduce instances of many of the avoidable ones.

Thanks,

-Smac

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As with any study I’d like more info.  
if it’s about STIs then I imagine one timers who married experienced lovers would be at high risk as well.  If it’s not about STIs then I’ll sleep better tonight. ;)

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28 minutes ago, katherine the great said:

This is a surprise? It’s been common knowledge for a long time that HPV astronomically increases the chances of a woman getting cervical cancer.

It's not brand new.  But it's about more than HPV.  And it's corroborative of prior findings.

From the article: "The findings chime with those of previous studies, implicating sexually transmitted infections in the development of several types of cancer and hepatitis, suggest the researchers."

Thanks,

-Smac

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36 minutes ago, katherine the great said:

This is a surprise? It’s been common knowledge for a long time that HPV astronomically increases the chances of a woman getting cervical cancer.

I do not think the  article indicate the "type" of cancer. But to your point, other articles lay out that increased sexual partners increase STD/STI, which increase cancer risk.  To the conclusion from the article below it seem the more appropriate question(s) to ask are if the person has ever had a STD/STI rather than number of sexual partners.

From the BMJ:

Original research
 
The relationship between chronic diseases and number of sexual partners: an exploratory analysis
 

Abstract

Background We investigated sex-specific associations between lifetime number of sexual partners and several health outcomes in a large sample of older adults in England.

Methods We used cross-sectional data from 2537 men and 3185 women aged ≥50 years participating in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Participants reported the number of sexual partners they had had in their lifetime. Outcomes were self-rated health and self-reported limiting long-standing illness, cancer, coronary heart disease, and stroke. We used logistic regression to analyse associations between lifetime number of sexual partners and health outcomes, adjusted for relevant sociodemographic and health-related covariates.

Results Having had 10 or more lifetime sexual partners was associated with higher odds of reporting a diagnosis of cancer than having had 0–1 sexual partners in men (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.83) and women (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.51), respectively. Women who had 10 or more lifetime sexual partners also had higher odds of reporting a limiting long-standing illness (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.35). No other statistically significant associations were observed.

Conclusions A higher lifetime number of sexual partners is associated with increased odds of reported cancer. Longitudinal research is required to establish causality. Understanding the predictive value of lifetime number of sexual partners as a behavioural risk factor may improve clinical assessment of cancer risk in older adults.

 

 

Edited by provoman
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4 hours ago, provoman said:

I do not think the  article indicate the "type" of cancer. But to your point, other articles lay out that increased sexual partners increase STD/STI, which increase cancer risk.  To the conclusion from the article below it seem the more appropriate question(s) to ask are if the person has ever had a STD/STI rather than number of sexual partners.

From the BMJ:

Original research
 
The relationship between chronic diseases and number of sexual partners: an exploratory analysis
 

Abstract

Background We investigated sex-specific associations between lifetime number of sexual partners and several health outcomes in a large sample of older adults in England.

Methods We used cross-sectional data from 2537 men and 3185 women aged ≥50 years participating in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Participants reported the number of sexual partners they had had in their lifetime. Outcomes were self-rated health and self-reported limiting long-standing illness, cancer, coronary heart disease, and stroke. We used logistic regression to analyse associations between lifetime number of sexual partners and health outcomes, adjusted for relevant sociodemographic and health-related covariates.

Results Having had 10 or more lifetime sexual partners was associated with higher odds of reporting a diagnosis of cancer than having had 0–1 sexual partners in men (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.83) and women (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.51), respectively. Women who had 10 or more lifetime sexual partners also had higher odds of reporting a limiting long-standing illness (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.35). No other statistically significant associations were observed.

Conclusions A higher lifetime number of sexual partners is associated with increased odds of reported cancer. Longitudinal research is required to establish causality. Understanding the predictive value of lifetime number of sexual partners as a behavioural risk factor may improve clinical assessment of cancer risk in older adults.

 

 

Thanks for sharing, I didn’t look at the study before.  So, this study only shows correlation and not causality.  It also shows a correlation for “limiting long-lasting illness” in women.

We know that HPV increases risk of cancer in both women and men, so there definitely can be some causality there, but beyond that, this isn’t telling us much.  It could be that those who have 10+ sexual partners are more likely to smoke, drink, or engage in other activities that increase risk for cancer and other chronic diseases.   There is no way that we can link this increased risk directly to sex or STD’s from this study.

Edited by pogi
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I suspect that a high number of sexual partners correlates strongly with other risk factors, such as drinking and drug use. The personality type that seeks many different partners tends to engage in a variety of risky behaviors.

While I am very much a believer in the spiritual, emotional, and physical benefits of chastity, I'm not sure that correlation equals causation here.

Edited by rchorse
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5 hours ago, pogi said:

Thanks for sharing, I didn’t look at the study before.  So, this study only shows correlation and not causality.  It also shows a correlation for “limiting long-lasting illness” in women.

I'd like to see the entire article but don't want to pay for it. For instance: What types of cancers are linked to more sexual partners? Obviously the cancers that we know can be high risk for those who contract STD's. Also, Hep B. I'm curious to know if this study shows previously unknown links. (I doubt it). Also, metal illnesses.

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My guess is that the study is mostly talking about HPV related cancers.  That is mostly genital cancers, the highest risk population and cancer being cervical cancer in women.  This would also include **** and oropharyngeal cancer.  Hopefully the last sentence is self explanatory.  I couldn`t find a nice way to elucidate that any more.  

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1 hour ago, readstoomuch said:

My guess is that the study is mostly talking about HPV related cancers.  That is mostly genital cancers, the highest risk population and cancer being cervical cancer in women.  This would also include **** and oropharyngeal cancer.  Hopefully the last sentence is self explanatory.  I couldn`t find a nice way to elucidate that any more.  

Based on the abstract it seems to me the researches were simply seeking to find another way to "screen" for cancer risk.

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