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Utah has fewest alcohol related driving deaths - Duh!


JAHS

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How does Utah's alcohol consumption stack up against other states?

Surprise — among the 50 states, Utahns drink the least amount of beer.

According to a recent Gallup poll, some 63% of American adults drink alcohol — and the favored beverage among them is beer. Some 42% of American drinkers prefer beer, compared to 34% who choose wine, and just 19% who enjoy liquor the most. 
Americans consumed an estimated 6.3 billion gallons of beer in 2018, or about 26.2 gallons per drinking-age adult. Beer consumption patterns are not uniform across the U.S., however, and in some states, residents are more likely to reach for a beer than in others. 
In Utah, there are both religious and legislative reasons for Utah drinking less alcohol than other states.
With a heavy presence from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, whose beliefs require that members abstain from alcohol, it makes sense why the state would not be among the top states in terms of alcohol consumption statistics.

Utah state laws also maintain that there can only be one bar for every 10,200 residents, meaning that with a population of just over 3 million people, Utah is only allowed to have around 300 bars in the entire state.

Still, the Beehive State is moving closer to the standards of other states in ways as Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill in March that would raise the cap on the alcohol by weight of Utah beers from 3.2% to 4.0% after 86 years.
The change in alcohol by weight would also raise the alcohol by volume up to 5%, moves that will go into effect on Nov. 1 of this year.

In nine of the 10 states with the highest per-capita beer consumption, the share of adults who either binge drink or drink heavily exceeds the 18% national excessive drinking rate.

Utah
• 2018 per capita beer consumption: 18.6 gallons (the least)
• 10 yr. consumption change: -9.3% (12th highest)
• Excessive drinking rate: 13.4% (3rd lowest)
• Driving deaths involving alcohol: 20.4% (the lowest)

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20 hours ago, JAHS said:

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Still, the Beehive State is moving closer to the standards of other states in ways as Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill in March that would raise the cap on the alcohol by weight of Utah beers from 3.2% to 4.0% after 86 years.
The change in alcohol by weight would also raise the alcohol by volume up to 5%, moves that will go into effect on Nov. 1 of this year.

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Alcohol in ancient Egyptian beer, which everyone including children drank, was brewed at 3 - 4%.  Now we are going to have 5% beer in Utah?  Is that a good thing?

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On 9/22/2019 at 11:41 PM, Robert F. Smith said:

Alcohol in ancient Egyptian beer, which everyone including children drank, was brewed at 3 - 4%.  Now we are going to have 5% beer in Utah?  Is that a good thing?

I'm not sure if the difference between 3-4% and 5% is all that remarkable. Is it a distinction without a difference?  

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4 hours ago, Stargazer said:

I'm not sure if the difference between 3-4% and 5% is all that remarkable. Is it a distinction without a difference?  

This seems like a useful explanation (first website that came up):

Quote

But, to break it down in simpler terms, there are about 1.4 units of alcohol in a 350ml glass of 4% beer, so if you're drinking one beer per hour, your body is processing 1 unit of alcohol and leaving .4 units leftover to give you that slightly tipsy feeling.

If you were to have another of the same beer the next hour, the exact same process happens and you're left with .8 units of alcohol in your body, and 1.2 units if you have another glass of beer in hour three.

Now, it's highly likely that you'll be having more than one beer per hour but for arguments sake, let's stick with that measurement.

There are about 1.8 units of alcohol in a 350ml glass of 5% beer. Therefore if you're drinking one an hour you'll be left with an alcohol surplus of .8 units after your first beer, 1.6 after your second and 2.4 after your third.

Basically over three glasses in three hours, you will have double the amount of alcohol in your system from the 5% beer (2.4 units of alcohol) than you would have from your 4% beer (1.2 units of alcohol).

https://www.joe.ie/news/why-5-beer-gets-you-so-much-drunker-than-4-beer-despite-the-small-difference-510018

This is where it got the info from:

http://draftmag.com/science-session-abv-processing/

Quote

We begin with a quiz: When it comes to our body’s alcohol intake, what’s the real difference between 4% and 5% alcohol by volume?

(a) 1%
(b) 20%
(c) 25%
(d) Much more than 25%...

All of that excess—inevitable unless we’re drinking the lightest table beer—affects our mood, our blood-alcohol levels, our physical coordination, our ability to think and speak, to operate machinery. It affects our ability to not embarrass ourselves in front of potential or current mates. It’s important, and it’s important that the difference is substantial.

Many of us beer-inclined folks tend to drink more than is healthy for us. Not all of us, but many of us. It’s important to recognize these things. If we’re going to make better decisions, we need better information. Better labeling on the package wouldn’t hurt either.

So the correct answer is (d). And it may be the difference between self-indulgence and plain old drunken stupidity.

 

Edited by Calm
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I do like that title, more . . .

 

Well I hope it continues to be lower and lower as an example with leader flyers or ads something to the effect of your amazing brain that can solve the worlds most complex problems so now why are you abusing what God gave you?

A powerful tool just take care of it and keep it sharp.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/22/2019 at 4:41 PM, Robert F. Smith said:

Alcohol in ancient Egyptian beer, which everyone including children drank, was brewed at 3 - 4%.  Now we are going to have 5% beer in Utah?  Is that a good thing?

I have a high school friend who owns and operates a brewery in our home town in California . Every time he comes out to visit he complains about Utah beer.  I'm not a beer drinker, but he tells me that alcohol levels affect the taste.  Most all of beers available in California range from 4% to 9% in alcohol content.

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3 hours ago, sunstoned said:

I have a high school friend who owns and operates a brewery in our home town in California . Every time he comes out to visit he complains about Utah beer.  I'm not a beer drinker, but he tells me that alcohol levels affect the taste.  Most all of beers available in California range from 4% to 9% in alcohol content.

Most British beer is from 4 to 6% alcohol.  However, Brits tend to drink lower percent beer because a pub is for socializing, not for getting drunk, and they like to spend lots of time in the pub.

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On 9/27/2019 at 8:46 AM, Stargazer said:

I'm not sure if the difference between 3-4% and 5% is all that remarkable. Is it a distinction without a difference?  

David Brooks pointed out that, in America,

Quote

"Thanks to the temperance movement, . . adult per-capita alcohol consumption fell from 7.1 gallons a year to 1.8 gallons a year between 1830 and 1850.”  Brooks, NYT, Mar 6, 2012, online at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/06/opinion/brooks-the-rediscovery-of-character.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20120306 .

My own people in Richland County, Ohio, formed their own local Temperance Society in 1827, giving up on their morn-til-night whiskey drinking.  At year's end they all took stock and found that they saved a lot of money not buying booze, and that they had actually become better farmers -- and their wives were happier.  So they gave up booze entirely for the next century and a half.  And, like good Methodists, they never looked back.  I can still recall growing up in the 40s and 50s never seeing any of my aunts, uncles, or cousins drinking (or smoking, or cussing): Good Methodists all.  

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On 10/11/2019 at 10:53 AM, Robert F. Smith said:

David Brooks pointed out that, in America,

My own people in Richland County, Ohio, formed their own local Temperance Society in 1827, giving up on their morn-til-night whiskey drinking.  At year's end they all took stock and found that they saved a lot of money not buying booze, and that they had actually become better farmers -- and their wives were happier.  So they gave up booze entirely for the next century and a half.  And, like good Methodists, they never looked back.  I can still recall growing up in the 40s and 50s never seeing any of my aunts, uncles, or cousins drinking (or smoking, or cussing): Good Methodists all.  

That's wonderful, but I asked: "I'm not sure if the difference between 3-4% and 5% is all that remarkable. Is it a distinction without a difference?"

Were you answering my question?

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1 hour ago, Stargazer said:

That's wonderful, but I asked: "I'm not sure if the difference between 3-4% and 5% is all that remarkable. Is it a distinction without a difference?"

Were you answering my question?

The David Brooks quote and my confirmation had nothing to do with your question, nor with the ABV of any kind of booze.  However, the context was a meaningless increase in ABV in Utah, where most people wisely abstain.  I was riffing in that earlier comment -- sorry to mislead.

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6 hours ago, Robert F. Smith said:

The David Brooks quote and my confirmation had nothing to do with your question, nor with the ABV of any kind of booze.  However, the context was a meaningless increase in ABV in Utah, where most people wisely abstain.  I was riffing in that earlier comment -- sorry to mislead.

OK, no problem!

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On 9/27/2019 at 8:46 AM, Stargazer said:

I'm not sure if the difference between 3-4% and 5% is all that remarkable. Is it a distinction without a difference?  

4% is 33% more than 3%. In other words, it takes 4 beers at 3% to get the same amount of alcohol as 3 beers at 4%.

5% is 67% more than 3%. In other words, it takes 5 beers at 3% to get the same amount of alcohol as 3 beers at 5%.

5% is 25% more than 4%. In other words, it takes 5 beers at 4% to get the same amount of alcohol as 4 beers at 5%.

IMO there is a significant difference.

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