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Three Fastest Growing States are in Mormon Corridor


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The three fastest growing states in America are in the Mormon Corridor -- Idaho, Utah, and Nevada:

http://start.att.net/news/read/category/news/article/fox_news-idaho_is_fastestgrowing_state_illinois_slips_to_6t-rfoxnews .

In future this means that the upcoming 2020 U.S. Census may require an allocation of additional Congressional representation to those areas, and a consequent loss to other states.

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27 minutes ago, Robert F. Smith said:

The three fastest growing states in America are in the Mormon Corridor -- Idaho, Utah, and Nevada:

http://start.att.net/news/read/category/news/article/fox_news-idaho_is_fastestgrowing_state_illinois_slips_to_6t-rfoxnews .

In future this means that the upcoming 2020 U.S. Census may require an allocation of additional Congressional representation to those areas, and a consequent loss to other states.

I found this very interesting and wonder what the big reason is...economics??  Safety??  What do you think??

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59 minutes ago, Jeanne said:

I found this very interesting and wonder what the big reason is...economics??  Safety??  What do you think??

The usual reasons.  Large numbers of returned bilingual  missionaries makes a good location for international business.

The economy in Utah is also focused on industries in growth.  It's all IT, tech and sales here.  Not much else.

And large families who emphasize education equals large numbers of entry level young professionals.

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1 hour ago, Jeanne said:

I found this very interesting and wonder what the big reason is...economics??  Safety??  What do you think??

According to the article, births outnumbered deaths in this region (which even includes Arizona), and that is a primary characteristic of the Mormon Corridor.  Add to that the low crime rate and other inducements, and it makes sense.  However, general growth in America is primarily in the West, and in the South.  Other areas are losing out.

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On December 25, 2017 at 11:36 AM, Jeanne said:

I found this very interesting and wonder what the big reason is...economics??  Safety??  What do you think??

"Safety and economics" always run hand in hand. Business, nor societies can grow in chaos. 

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A percentage point increase in a small state is much easier to achieve than it would be for a large state. Maths and stuff. If we put Idaho's growth in California, for instance, would count as a tiny fraction of a percentage point.

Edited by Gray
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21 hours ago, Gray said:

A percentage point increase in a small state is much easier to achieve than it would be for a large state. Maths and stuff. If we put Idaho's growth in California, for instance, would count as a tiny fraction of a percentage point.

California has had as many new residents as the Church had convert baptisms in 2016 (around 240,000).  Texas and Florida had far more people added to their states over the course of last year.  

We think of California having a ton of Mormons, but the number of Mormons in the state has decreased over the years and in 3 years time the amount of new Californians reaches the amount of LDS in the state.  Percent LDS in California is under 2%.  Percent LDS in the US is just over 2%.  

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16 minutes ago, stemelbow said:

California has had as many new residents as the Church had convert baptisms in 2016 (around 240,000).  Texas and Florida had far more people added to their states over the course of last year.  

We think of California having a ton of Mormons, but the number of Mormons in the state has decreased over the years and in 3 years time the amount of new Californians reaches the amount of LDS in the state.  Percent LDS in California is under 2%.  Percent LDS in the US is just over 2%.  

I wonder what's driving the exodus? Real estate prices?

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1767.jpg

Here's a table specific to California.

I don't really know why, but you can see the growth rate of LDS members in the state has decreased since the late 80s, after having steeply increased during the 80s.  in the past 30 years there have been, as you can see, 88,000 Mormons added to the state, while the population of the state has increased some 21 million (less than half of 1 percent of the state's growth has been Mormons that explains the decrease in percent LDS).  

I'm sure there's been some secularism that has offered some effect here.  Mormon people aren't just leaving the state more than they are entering, but some are leaving the Church itself, I'd guess.  

I'm open to others ideas though.  

Here's Texas (2nd most populous state in US) for comparison:

1861.jpg

LDS population continues to increase there.  

 

 

Edited by stemelbow
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