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Word of Wisdom Poll of Personal Beliefs


Word of Wisdom opinions  

66 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you personally consider the Word of Wisdom a commandment (regardless of Church position) as opposed to wise advice?

  2. 2. Which of the following do you personally consider prohibited by the Word of Wisdom (regardless of Church position)? Check all that apply.

    • Black Tea/Coffee - HOT
    • Black Tea/Coffee - ICED
    • Herbal Teas - HOT or ICED
    • Energy Drinks/High Caffeine Soda
    • Hot Drinks of any kind - to include Cocoa/Hot Chocolate, Pero/Caro, Postum, Chicory, and any others you can name.
    • Tobacco
    • Beer
    • Wine
    • Liquor
    • Strong drinks - to include ALL alcohol
    • Meat (not during winter/cold/famine)
    • Fruit and Vegetables out of season
  3. 3. Do you consider following the Church position on the Word of Wisdom more important than the instructions in the document itself?



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11 minutes ago, HappyJackWagon said:

Clearly the canonized scripture doesn't mean much to the church today because current leaders trump past leaders or even scripture.

Well, to be fair that's been true since the days of  Brigham Young, and was reinforced by President Benson.

  •  I took the books and laid them down one by one beginning with the Bible, and said, "there lies the Bible, there the Book of Mormon, and the Book of Doctrine and Covenants, the revelations God has given through Joseph for the salvation of the people in the 19th Century, yet I would not give the ashes of a rye straw for these three books so far as they are efficacious for the salvation of any man, that lives without the living oracles of God." 
  • Second: The living prophet is more vital to us than the Standard Works.
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1 hour ago, JLHPROF said:

But not this one.
12 Yea, flesh also of beasts and of the fowls of the air, I, the Lord, have ordained for the use of man with thanksgiving; nevertheless they are to be used sparingly;
13 And it is pleasing unto me that they should not be used, only in times of winter, or of cold, or famine.

I eat meat sparingly. I just reviewed my meals from the past week and the last time I ate any meat was for lunch five days ago. And that was a treat between the sessions of Saturday conference. (I took our missionaries to a takeaway for lunch.) 

Quote

But not this one.
11 Every herb in the season thereof, and every fruit in the season thereof; all these to be used with prudence and thanksgiving.

I live where all vegetables and many fruits can be grown year 'round. Easy for me! :D 

50 minutes ago, JLHPROF said:

I am honestly mystified.
I think many of those 19 people need to go back and change their vote for question 3 to Yes - following the Church is more important than the scripture.

The WofW says meat should be eaten sparingly. The Lord then goes on to say that it is pleasing to him if it is only eaten at certain times. For some reason, He didn't feel the need to command it (or anything else in the beginning, as has already been pointed out). I think you're the one over-interpreting the scripture.

By the way, how do you think a Saint should follow the WofW if s/he lives where there is no cold or winter?

Edited by Hamba Tuhan
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21 minutes ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I eat meat sparingly. I just reviewed my meals from the past week and the last time I ate any meat was for lunch five days ago. And that was a treat between the sessions of Saturday conference. (I took our missionaries to a takeaway for lunch.) 

I live where all vegetables and many fruits can be grown year 'round. Easy for me! :D 

The WofW says meat should be eaten sparingly. The Lord then goes on to say that it is pleasing to him if it is only eaten at certain times. For some reason, He didn't feel the need to command it (or anything else in the beginning, as has already been pointed out). I think you're the one over-interpreting the scripture.

By the way, how do you think a Saint should follow the WofW if s/he lives where there is no cold or winter?

Nothing in the WofW is commanded.  It specifies that.

I don't think I'm over-interpreting anything.  Merely pointing out that we pick and choose verses to follow and that Church policy holds more weight than scripture where the WofW is concerned.

BTW, congrats on sticking so closely to scripture.  Wish I could.

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The one person who responded that he or she considered herbal (not black) tea to be against the word of wisdom better stop eating soup -- because unless the soup is consomme or some kind of meat tea without any vegetable matter, soup is vegetation that is cooked in water. Which is no different from herbal tea.

And the word "tea" refers to a particular species of plant, camillia sinensis. The end result of allowing any vegetation to steep in hot (or cold) water is called an infusion, not tea, and the end result of actually boiling any vegetation in water is called a decoction, not tea. The common use of the word tea to refer to any vegetable infusion is not accurate. And if it were, LDS people in the UK would not be allowed to eat the evening meal, because that meal is commonly referred to as tea.  Of course, this is because after a long day of labour (<-- note the spelling), the family would enjoy a hot cuppa while eating dinner, and eventually the meal itself began to be referred to as tea. I remember when I lived briefly in England back in the early 70s not long after arriving I got invited by a member of my ward to "stay for tea." I was horrified, thinking that the LDS in the British Isles, or perhaps just this one family, had gotten quite liberal in their understanding of the WoW. I felt quite stupid later, after it turned out that what was meant was "stay for dinner".

And be it called black tea, green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, flowering, or anything else, it is the specific plant, camillia sinensis, which is the subject of the word of wisdom.  So leave that plant alone! It's not good for you.  But peppermint is just fine! 

Likewise coffee cake is perfectly OK to eat, as long as it doesn't actually contain coffee, and having a coffee break at work is perfectly OK, as long as you don't drink coffee, and eating a meal at a coffee shop is not against the word of wisdom if you don't drink coffee there. And if you have a coffee table in your living room (in which you surely don't live) is likewise unexceptionable.  Although I once heard an LDS person refer to one of these as a "postum table"!

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2 minutes ago, Stargazer said:

The one person who responded that he or she considered herbal (not black) tea to be against the word of wisdom better stop eating soup -- because unless the soup is consomme or some kind of meat tea without any vegetable matter, soup is vegetation that is cooked in water. Which is no different from herbal tea.

And the word "tea" refers to a particular species of plant, camillia sinensis. The end result of allowing any vegetation to steep in hot (or cold) water is called an infusion, not tea, and the end result of actually boiling any vegetation in water is called a decoction, not tea. The common use of the word tea to refer to any vegetable infusion is not accurate. And if it were, LDS people in the UK would not be allowed to eat the evening meal, because that meal is commonly referred to as tea.  Of course, this is because after a long day of labour (<-- note the spelling), the family would enjoy a hot cuppa while eating dinner, and eventually the meal itself began to be referred to as tea. I remember when I lived briefly in England back in the early 70s not long after arriving I got invited by a member of my ward to "stay for tea." I was horrified, thinking that the LDS in the British Isles, or perhaps just this one family, had gotten quite liberal in their understanding of the WoW. I felt quite stupid later, after it turned out that what was meant was "stay for dinner".

And be it called black tea, green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, flowering, or anything else, it is the specific plant, camillia sinensis, which is the subject of the word of wisdom.  So leave that plant alone! It's not good for you.  But peppermint is just fine! 

Likewise coffee cake is perfectly OK to eat, as long as it doesn't actually contain coffee, and having a coffee break at work is perfectly OK, as long as you don't drink coffee, and eating a meal at a coffee shop is not against the word of wisdom if you don't drink coffee there. And if you have a coffee table in your living room (in which you surely don't live) is likewise unexceptionable.  Although I once heard an LDS person refer to one of these as a "postum table"!

Interesting detail. Thanks for sharing.

But how do you know the bolded part? Where is that stated in scripture? Where is "tea" stated at all? It's not. That too, is an interpretation.

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8 minutes ago, Stargazer said:

The one person who responded that he or she considered herbal (not black) tea to be against the word of wisdom better stop eating soup --

And this is the response that is so common.  The slippery slope argument.

There is no rhyme, reason, or logic to our current application of this revelation.  It truly has become a test of obedience to our leaders instead of revelation of doctrine from God.

 

Edited by JLHPROF
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9 minutes ago, JLHPROF said:

And this is the response that is so common.  The slippery slope argument.

There is no rhyme, reason, or logic to our current application of this revelation.  It truly has become a test of obedience to our leaders instead of revelation of doctrine from God.

 

It's not a slippery slope argument. I'm just saying that regarding peppermint tea as against the word of wisdom is not valid.

I am actually unsure what you're saying here. The Church has said that as far as the WoW is concerned, "hot drinks" means coffee and tea. I believe it is the case that Hyrum Smith made that clear. And calling something tea doesn't make it tea.

I'm curious. What do you consider the logical, rhyming and reasonable application of this revelation?

 

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2 minutes ago, Stargazer said:

It's not a slippery slope argument. I'm just saying that regarding peppermint tea as against the word of wisdom is not valid.

I am actually unsure what you're saying here. The Church has said that as far as the WoW is concerned, "hot drinks" means coffee and tea. I believe it is the case that Hyrum Smith made that clear. And calling something tea doesn't make it tea.

I'm curious. What do you consider the logical, rhyming and reasonable application of this revelation?

 

What is it that makes a hot drink prohibited by the WofW?

Why did God advise/command we not partake?

If we cannot answer that question I would suggest we have no understanding of the document.

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1 hour ago, JLHPROF said:

It truly has become a test of obedience to our leaders instead of revelation of doctrine from God.

As Margaret Barker has pointed out in reference to the Jews at the time of Lehi and thereafter, without living prophets, revelation fossilises into law. The Jewish leaders, Barker has argued, actually chose law over prophets because they didn't like the 'flux' of prophetic interpretation. They preferred the rigid predictability -- and enforceability -- of law. I'm not sure that went so well for them in the end. The Lord seemed rather unimpressed when He found Himself in the midst of a people who could recite scripture till the sheep came home and knew precisely how every commandment should be kept but who found John a nuisance.

1 hour ago, JLHPROF said:

Merely pointing out that we pick and choose verses to follow and that Church policy holds more weight than scripture where the WofW is concerned.

Those who, under divine authority, have made the Word of Wisdom more binding than it was in the beginning surely have the prerogative to determine which of its verses provide the minimum threshold, I should think.

Quote

BTW, congrats on sticking so closely to scripture.  Wish I could.

You can!

But I'm not sure how closely I stick to scripture. I mean, it was actually unseasonably warm on Saturday when I ate the bánh mì thịt nguội. And we're not in any kind of famine.

Edited by Hamba Tuhan
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1 hour ago, JLHPROF said:

What is it that makes a hot drink prohibited by the WofW?

Why did God advise/command we not partake?

If we cannot answer that question I would suggest we have no understanding of the document.

I don't know what it is about a hot drink that makes it proscribed. I do know that Hyrum Smith identified it as follows:

"Again, hot drinks are not for the body or belly. There are many who wonder what this can mean, whether it refers to tea or coffee, or not. I say it does refer to tea and coffee."

I obtained this from the FAIRMormon website at Hot Drinks

If someone wants to disregard this, and disregard what the Church says "hot drinks" are for this purpose, and go solely by the exact words of the WoW, they may have at it if they wish. In short, if it is the "hotness" of the drink that is the core of the matter, then by all means they can drink their coffee and tea (or any other drink) cold, and still answer in the affirmative when asked if they keep the Word of Wisdom.  They can also drink beer if they want, inasmuch as it is not "strong" (when compared to schnaps, for example), and even mandate for themselves the exact alcohol content that makes it strong, if that makes them happy. The exact wording of the Word of Wisdom seems to contain a great deal of wiggle room on all this, after all.

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1 hour ago, HappyJackWagon said:

Interesting detail. Thanks for sharing.

But how do you know the bolded part? Where is that stated in scripture? Where is "tea" stated at all? It's not. That too, is an interpretation.

You're right that it isn't stated in scripture. And apparently the saints in Joseph's time were a bit confused about what hot drinks referred to. And Hyrum Smith wrote in Times and Seasons, that it pertained to coffee and tea. 

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7 hours ago, Calm said:

I would suggest altering (though it is probably too late) number 1 to a combination...some of it is a commandment and some is not.

Yes, that is one of the problems.  I finally just tried to answer it as best as I could because none of the the three questions with their options fit for me well, except for the "other answer" and I wanted to see the results!  I probably spent too much time giving surveys in a marketing research job I had in college. lol  

7 hours ago, JLHPROF said:

Probably too late given about a dozen responses.
They'll just have to comment.

I have to say I am finding the disconnect between the scripture and personal belief fascinating.  Far more focus on current Church position than the canonized scripture.  I asked for personal belief concerning the Word of Wisdom and the vast majority of members are going with Church position over scripture.

Perhaps those that answered that way answered it that way because they feel that modern teachings supersede ancient teachings.  You could say, "leave the church out of it", but their beliefs are what the church teaches on it.  I personally feel that some of the church positions are more important and some are not. 

6 hours ago, hope_for_things said:

Those are really good articles and I think you make some good points.  I wonder where the big disconnect is then.  Maybe the church should have a bar for physical fitness before allowing people to serve missions and get a temple recommend?  How do members typically treat the temple recommend question about keeping the WoW?  Would most people consider one drink of wine a few weeks before the interview a disqualifier?  How would most people who are overweight, not exercising, and neglecting their emotional and physical health answer that WoW question?  

Now, I'm not advocating for stricter temple recommend requirements (personally I'd prefer they got rid of the interview all together), I just think that this hypothetical highlights something about the culture, where most people know that the WoW is about an overall healthy lifestyle in general, but in specific they value certain prohibitions as emphasized by church leadership over the years, and the rest of the principle of the WoW is much less important.  This needs to change.  

Where do you set the bar though for TR?   My husband goes to the gym 4-6 nights a week when he is in this country and would go more often than 4 if he didn't home teach or go to the temple or do his homework.  His heart rate is good.  His blood pressure is good.  His cholesterol tests etc run good.  Some of those actually run really good.  He eats a lot of fruit and veggies.  He keeps track of his food and doesn't eat a high amount of calories very often.  Yet, he is still overweight - and he has had testing to see why that might be (thyroid etc).  He has found that he loses weight when he gets under about 1500 calories - he is 6'6". 

My youngest  is 16.  It is a struggle to get him to eat veggies (I combine them with our main dish so he eats more). He loves to drink pop. Today he ate half a bag of cheetos that someone gave him while we were visiting there.  I'm always finding out he is eating pizza and cookies .  He is  now 6'1"  and 130 pounds.  He has taken an interest in getting in shape with pushups etc lately and he is really building some good muscles, but lean wise nothing has changed - he has just always been thin (as I once was). 

So how about a bar for how many fruits/veggies you can have?  I once took a health test for our insurance.  It said I wasn't eating enough fruit.  I'm a  Type 1diabetic. Yea, fruit isn't always the greatest thing for me.  

Then look at the food of different cultures.  Having seen food ideas for Congolese, Afghani, Iraqi, Somali, Malaysian refuges and with my husband's and my travels etc. I have seen that what we all eat culturally can be VERY different.

 

3 hours ago, Stargazer said:

The one person who responded that he or she considered herbal (not black) tea to be against the word of wisdom better stop eating soup -- because unless the soup is consomme or some kind of meat tea without any vegetable matter, soup is vegetation that is cooked in water. Which is no different from herbal tea.

And the word "tea" refers to a particular species of plant, camillia sinensis. The end result of allowing any vegetation to steep in hot (or cold) water is called an infusion, not tea, and the end result of actually boiling any vegetation in water is called a decoction, not tea. The common use of the word tea to refer to any vegetable infusion is not accurate. And if it were, LDS people in the UK would not be allowed to eat the evening meal, because that meal is commonly referred to as tea.  Of course, this is because after a long day of labour (<-- note the spelling), the family would enjoy a hot cuppa while eating dinner, and eventually the meal itself began to be referred to as tea. I remember when I lived briefly in England back in the early 70s not long after arriving I got invited by a member of my ward to "stay for tea." I was horrified, thinking that the LDS in the British Isles, or perhaps just this one family, had gotten quite liberal in their understanding of the WoW. I felt quite stupid later, after it turned out that what was meant was "stay for dinner".

And be it called black tea, green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, flowering, or anything else, it is the specific plant, camillia sinensis, which is the subject of the word of wisdom.  So leave that plant alone! It's not good for you.  But peppermint is just fine! 

Likewise coffee cake is perfectly OK to eat, as long as it doesn't actually contain coffee, and having a coffee break at work is perfectly OK, as long as you don't drink coffee, and eating a meal at a coffee shop is not against the word of wisdom if you don't drink coffee there. And if you have a coffee table in your living room (in which you surely don't live) is likewise unexceptionable.  Although I once heard an LDS person refer to one of these as a "postum table"!

Here is where the problem comes.  If you look at the missionary lessons then it says (or did at one time) say "tea".  It didn't specify black tea or green tea or whatever kind of tea.  Just tea.  

And if you look up the definition of "infusion" you can find tea or that "tea" can be made of various plants. 

So while I won't argue either way of whether herbal teas are against the word of wisdom or not, there is enough out there to confuse matters that some people will say it is against the Word of Wisdom and some will say it isn't and I am ok with that.  I don't think we need to get after people for following their conscious on herbal tea whether they think it is ok or not. 

Edited by Rain
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So caffeine free coffee hot or cold is ok while caffeinated coffee hot or cold is not, cold drinks whether caffeinated or not are ok.  So it's not the temperature,  nor the caffeine, nor that it's coffee, I'm so confused. Can someone make sense of why caffeinated coffee is forbidden again? And if someone combines a  hot caffeine free coffee with their caffeinated soda does that then make the beverage prohibited?

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6 hours ago, JLHPROF said:

I find it so interesting that people would say the Church position isn't as important as the scripture, but yet don't consider things prohibited in the scripture to be prohibited by the Word of Wisdom presumably because the Church doesn't say so.

The most fascinating thing to me about the Word of Wisdom is always the buffet approach taken by members, whether those who choose not to follow some or those who only follow the parts the Church emphasizes.

I don't think I've ever met anyone who actually follows the Word of Wisdom in scripture, myself included.
Does anyone know anyone who actually follows D&C 89 as it is written?

I believe I do, except I don't drink beer, and I believe it is written to expressly allow beer. Beer was actually a very common drink in ancient days. Well water could become dangerous with storage in the heat on trips. 

I do eat meat about once per day, and I believe that corresponds to "sparingly" except in times of famine...

I don't consider frozen or canned fruits to be a violation of the word of wisdom since they are in a fresh state.

I used to have a very high opinion of seeds and grains, but have come to moderate that to needing to be cooked. Uncooked, such foods present a problem for most people. It seems several thousand years of agriculture has moderated our ability to digest or otherwise disable lectins, which can become a problem for us if eaten in high amounts. So while I still consider such foods as beans to be healthy, they do need to be soaked and cooked as do most seeds.

I do drink hot chocolate and herbal teas, and don't consider them to be the type of "hot drinks" which were meant in the WoW. 

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The Jews spent a great deal of time outlining the specifics on " keeping the Sabbath Day ". I wonder if they spent the same amount of time juggling the issue of not eating pork? Can't have a whole ham, but the occasional BLT at McDs is OK. What about artificial bacon bits ? Allowed or not.

As for the WoW , would eating an apple a day be enough or does one need to consume at least 3  different types of fruit. Now a tomato is a fruit but most people think of it as a vegetable , so how do we count it? Oh, and what if one is allergic to wheat? Well, it says wheat is for man so suck it up princess and get into those carbs, no matter that you end up with digestive problems.

Maybe all Bishops need to be issued with BMI calipers and given instructions on their use. No TR if you are over a 30 !!!

Gnats and camels folks.

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2 minutes ago, Rain said:

Here is where the problem comes.  If you look at the missionary lessons then it says (or did at one time) say "tea".  It didn't specify black tea or green tea or whatever kind of tea.  Just tea.  

And if you look up the definition of "infusion" you can find tea or that "tea" can be made of various plants. 

So while I won't argue either way of whether herbal teas are against the word of wisdom or not, there is enough out there to confuse matters that some people will say it is against the Word of Wisdom and some will say it isn't and I am ok with that.  I don't think we need to get after people for following their conscious on herbal tea whether they think it is ok or not. 

I have not read the other posts so do not know what has been said. The word of Wisdom as given originally, as probably everyone posting here is aware, was not given as a commandment but was later decided by Brigham Young and the Quorum of the Twelve that it should be heeded as a commandment. There were discussions on what was meant by hot drinks and tea and coffee were the hot drinks that the Saints had been consuming at the time the WoW was given and that was established as the base line. Caffeine was never part of the discussion. It evidently was brought into play later as an explanation for including iced tea in the prohibition against tea and the reason for the prohibition against coffee. But then caffeinated drinks were never banned, which led me to wonder. I actually asked about that in my first Temple Recommend interview because I enjoy drinking Dr. Peppers. I was given a recommend but not admonished to stop drinking the soda.

So I do not drink teas or coffee because that is what is required right now. I never developed a taste for either one although it was present in my home for quite some time before my father became active in the church. If caffeinated drinks were added to the list of prohibited substances I would stop drinking them. I may not be wise but I try to be obedient. Just my two cents worth, if it is worth that much.

Glenn

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53 minutes ago, Glenn101 said:

I have not read the other posts so do not know what has been said. The word of Wisdom as given originally, as probably everyone posting here is aware, was not given as a commandment but was later decided by Brigham Young and the Quorum of the Twelve that it should be heeded as a commandment. There were discussions on what was meant by hot drinks and tea and coffee were the hot drinks that the Saints had been consuming at the time the WoW was given and that was established as the base line. Caffeine was never part of the discussion. It evidently was brought into play later as an explanation for including iced tea in the prohibition against tea and the reason for the prohibition against coffee. But then caffeinated drinks were never banned, which led me to wonder. I actually asked about that in my first Temple Recommend interview because I enjoy drinking Dr. Peppers. I was given a recommend but not admonished to stop drinking the soda.

So I do not drink teas or coffee because that is what is required right now. I never developed a taste for either one although it was present in my home for quite some time before my father became active in the church. If caffeinated drinks were added to the list of prohibited substances I would stop drinking them. I may not be wise but I try to be obedient. Just my two cents worth, if it is worth that much.

Glenn

Caffeine drinks actually were part of the Word of Wisdom bans according to a close family member who attended a solemn assembly where a prophet (President Kimball?) stated so. 

Some of the men in the church were told that. President Hinckley said something about caffeine on a national, non church program. We have been told to avoid addictive substances in conference. But "caffeine" is not included specifically as a commandment in any church matrials for the general membership. And that is why it is a commandment definition problem and why it has to be an individual thing. 

And really that is why we have the whole coffee/tea/herbal tea etc problems. Definitions. 

So we have to either go with section 89 or we have to go with more recent church publications like Preach my Gospel and Gospel Principles etc or some combination of them. Whatever definitions you accept there is a good likelyhood you will be breaking some other part of it so you really have to rely on the Lord and your honest, best understanding. 

Oh, and Dr Pepper? Ick. :D

Edited by Rain
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1 hour ago, Rain said:

Here is where the problem comes.  If you look at the missionary lessons then it says (or did at one time) say "tea".  It didn't specify black tea or green tea or whatever kind of tea.  Just tea.  

And if you look up the definition of "infusion" you can find tea or that "tea" can be made of various plants. 

So while I won't argue either way of whether herbal teas are against the word of wisdom or not, there is enough out there to confuse matters that some people will say it is against the Word of Wisdom and some will say it isn't and I am ok with that.  I don't think we need to get after people for following their conscious on herbal tea whether they think it is ok or not. 

Oh, I wouldn't "get after" them. I'd try to explain why they are looking beyond the mark, but I'm cool if that's what they want.

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2 minutes ago, Stargazer said:

Heresy! :D 

I have proof that it should be in the Word of Wisdom don'ts!  My SIL has a story where she loves her Dr. Pepper so much that she can't do without it and her oldest boy is a bit mischievous and spiked her bottle with ...soy sauce.  Upon drinking it as she was backing out the car it caused her to choke and back into her neighbor's tree across the street.  The way she tells it is much better of course.  

I actually don't like the taste, but it has nothing to do with that story!   

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4 minutes ago, Calm said:

I see a big problem there...so addicted she is drinking it while backing up?

Well, I can't remember exactly just how the story goes, but she did run into a tree across the street. One of those moments when you do something dumb rather than because of addiction, but that wouldn't make my case as well.  ;)  :D

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2 hours ago, Rain said:

Here is where the problem comes.  If you look at the missionary lessons then it says (or did at one time) say "tea".  It didn't specify black tea or green tea or whatever kind of tea.  Just tea. 

But I also teach people that the Word of Wisdom (as currently interpreted and taught by living prophets, for those who need the disclaimer) forbids drinking all alcoholic beverages, including beer, without worrying that people will be confused that they should give up their ginger beer, root beer, birch beer or other soft drink.

'Beer' means beer. It's a specific beverage. It includes all the various beers, including those with 'beer' in their names -- such as amber, blonde, dark, pale, light, etc. -- and those that go under different names -- such as ale, stout, lager, porter, etc. It doesn't include completely different beverages (such as soft drinks) that, for various historical reasons, happen to have 'beer' in their names.

This is exactly the same as tea. Tea is a specific beverage, in this case one containing the tea plant, Camellia sinensis. It includes all the various teas -- green, black, Oolong, Darjeeling, jasmine, etc. -- including those that don't have 'tea' in their names -- such as kombucha, chai and matcha. It doesn't include completely different beverages (such as herbal infusions) that, for historical reasons, happen to have 'tea' in their names in some countries. (Where I live, companies can't sell 'herbal tea'; it has to be called an 'infusion' by law. Makes things easy!)

Edited by Hamba Tuhan
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2 minutes ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

But I also teach people that the Word of Wisdom (as currently interpreted and taught by living prophets, for those who need the disclaimer) forbids drinking all alcoholic beverages, including beer, without worrying that people will be confused that they should give up their ginger beer, root beer, birch beer or other soft drink.

'Beer' means beer. It's s specific beverage. It includes all the various beers, including those with 'beer' in their names -- such as amber, blonde, dark, pale, light, etc. -- and those that go under different names -- such as ale, stout, lager, porter, etc. It doesn't include completely different beverages (such as soft drinks) that, for various historical reasons, happen to have 'beer' in their names.

This is exactly the same as tea. Tea is a specific beverage, in this case one containing the tea plant, Camellia sinensis. It includes all the various teas -- green, black, Oolong, Darjeeling, jasmine, etc. -- including those that don't have 'tea' in their names -- such as kombucha, chai and matcha. It doesn't include completely different beverages (such as herbal infusions) that, for historical reasons, happen to have 'tea' in their names in some countries. (Where I live, companies can't sell 'herbal tea'; it has to be called an 'infusion' by law. Makes things easy!)

But it isn't the word "beer" that is used.  It is the word "alcohol" that is used.  You won't have the same problem with it as you have with "tea" for that reason. At least in the English version. 

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