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Puttering around in genealogical stuff. Any fun stories to tell?


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I Am down in southern Missouri, visiting my mother. Am staying in her home, which is mostly unused since she is in a hospital.
 
Was not able to sleep so at 4: 00 AM. I was rummaging through the family materials which various (non-LDS) family members put together.
 
Thanks to those folks, we have nearly complete genealogy records here at my Mom's house.
 
God bless 'em, they don't seem to have believed in using the traditional genalogical "tree". Instead, they put together an eighty-odd page booklet giving a narrative account of various branches of the families. I suppose they wanted to focus upon "telling a story" but the names and dates and places and all just run together after awhile.
 
They have documents which establish that Jacob True Spears, a Revolutionary War veteran, was an ancestor. "True" (originally, Trew), was an Old Country family name preserved I supposed, by including it in Jacob's middle name.

Another was Samuel Scott, a Civil War veteran. It is interesting that my Mom's side of the family were pretty consistent religiously until the turn of the 20th century.
 
One poor ancestor married and buried three wives before he found the woman who bore the children in my family line. Tough times back then!
 
My maternal grandfather's religious heritage seems to have been very consistent for about a century-and---half, until the turn of the 20th century, when folks apparently started expkoring other dennominations. 
 
Some of the Trews/Trues and other family from the 1690's or before seem to have been associated with the Baptists.
 
However, the vast majority of family, on my Mom's side, have been members of the Methodist-Episcopal Church. The M-E apparently were a big part of the "Christian Connexion" of the 18th and 19th Century.
 
This was the denominational choice of most of the folks on my maternal gradad's side from the 1790's or thereabouts to the early 1900's when Claude and Iva, my grandparents, became Christian Church (Campbellite) members.  
 
After 1900, denominational ties seem to have loosened.  Some of Gradad's brothers & sisters or other family became Methodist. Others joined similar Campbellite sects or various smaller denominations throughout the area. 
 
My great-grandparents came to Westetn Missouri as homesteaders. I was surprised that folks were stil homesteading this part of the country in the early chapters 1900's.
 
Throughout the 19th century, they seem to have moved around quite a bit, Indiana and Kentuck y and Missouri and Arkansas being primary places where they roamed.
 
This area splits fairly evenly between Baptist, Methodists, & Campbellites, significant #'s of Mennonite/Amish, with smaller tributaries of Restorationist LDS groups and Pentecostals.
 
My maternal grandmother's side hasn't had genealogy done so thoroughly. I don't know what religious tradition that wing tended to give loyalty to. I am thinking they were mainly Baptist, but Methodist-Episcopal might be as well.
 
She was from dirt-poor  Ozark Mountain and Appalachian roots so it may be harder to track down her roots. There may be fewer written records.
 
My Aunt has done a lot of the work on my paternal side. And, she was much more well organized and systematic. I will have to contact her to ask for copies of the stuff she has done. But it should be easier to sift through.
 
If I elect to return to the LDS, I will have a heck of a lot of work to do on my maternal side to put all the mess together into a coherent family tree. But a whole lot of the legwork is done.
 
Anyone else have intersting talea to tell from their family genealogical work?
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I indicated on the DNA thread that most of my ancestors come from the British Isles.  Genealogical records indicate that most of these were servant-class Anglicans.  Several of these lines left England in the 1850's after joining the LDS Church and heeding the call to "gather to Zion."  One of my widowed 2nd Great-grandmothers crossed the plains with six small children in the first Mormon handcart company.

i also have family lines whose history in America goes back to the pre-Revolutionary War era.  These folks seem to have belonged to a variety of the Protestant religions that were prevalent in the Northeastern U.S.  One set of 2nd great-grandparents joined the LDS Church in the 1850's at the height of the anti-Mormon-anti-polygamy sentiment that resulted in Johnston's Army and the Utah War.  They finally came to Utah in 1861 and settled first on the Virgin River near present-day Mesquite, Nevada.  I found them on a census record which lists their occupation as "fishing."  Having visited both green and fertile New Jersey as well as the stark and inhospitable region around Mesquite, I have often asked myself if they had been at all disappointed in their new situation.  I can't imagine that they weren't; but then there is this from my 2nd great-grandmother:


"I had never sat on any but soft cushioned chairs and since have sat on nail kegs, but I have never regretted coming to Utah."

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I've had a number of interesting experiences with genealogy and temple work.  I've twice had the strong feeling that the man for whom I was proxy in the endowment was there with me.

In respect of my family, there was a branch of my family that I hadn't done any work for to speak of, but suddenly got the impression that I needed to get cracking on it.  Accordingly I did some digging and came up with a bunch of names, and submitted them.  My wife and I stood as proxies for a number of them.  I later discovered that there were five other sets of descendants of that branch, who were LDS, that got the same impression at about the same time, and we all were submitting baptism, endowment, and sealing requests to the system at about the same time.  So one ancestor would get baptized and confirmed in one temple by one branch, endowed by another branch in a completely different temple, and sealings would be mixed and matched here and there.  It was as if there had been a family conference in the Spirit World, and they had sent out a petition to have the Spirit of the Elijah kick all their LDS descendants into getting their work finally done!  Skeptics would say that this was all coincidence and meant nothing, but I've run into too many supposed coincidences in this life I've been going through.  Too many coincidences suggest that there are virtually no coincidences.

Well, that's my story.

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2 hours ago, VideoGameJunkie said:

Joseph Smith is my ancestor and so are some Kings of England, but I think lots of people have royalty in their genealogy. 

Pocahontas is my 11th or 12th great grandmother.  Apparently I am also descended from about 5 Roman emperors.

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On April 3, 2016 at 9:19 AM, flameburns623 said:
I Am down in southern Missouri, visiting my mother. Am staying in her home, which is mostly unused since she is in a hospital.
 
Was not able to sleep so at 4: 00 AM. I was rummaging through the family materials which various (non-LDS) family members put together.
 
Thanks to those folks, we have nearly complete genealogy records here at my Mom's house.
 
God bless 'em, they don't seem to have believed in using the traditional genalogical "tree". Instead, they put together an eighty-odd page booklet giving a narrative account of various branches of the families. I suppose they wanted to focus upon "telling a story" but the names and dates and places and all just run together after awhile.
 
They have documents which establish that Jacob True Spears, a Revolutionary War veteran, was an ancestor. "True" (originally, Trew), was an Old Country family name preserved I supposed, by including it in Jacob's middle name.

Another was Samuel Scott, a Civil War veteran. It is interesting that my Mom's side of the family were pretty consistent religiously until the turn of the 20th century.
 
One poor ancestor married and buried three wives before he found the woman who bore the children in my family line. Tough times back then!
 
My maternal grandfather's religious heritage seems to have been very consistent for about a century-and---half, until the turn of the 20th century, when folks apparently started expkoring other dennominations. 
 
Some of the Trews/Trues and other family from the 1690's or before seem to have been associated with the Baptists.
 
However, the vast majority of family, on my Mom's side, have been members of the Methodist-Episcopal Church. The M-E apparently were a big part of the "Christian Connexion" of the 18th and 19th Century.
 
This was the denominational choice of most of the folks on my maternal gradad's side from the 1790's or thereabouts to the early 1900's when Claude and Iva, my grandparents, became Christian Church (Campbellite) members.  
 
After 1900, denominational ties seem to have loosened.  Some of Gradad's brothers & sisters or other family became Methodist. Others joined similar Campbellite sects or various smaller denominations throughout the area. 
 
My great-grandparents came to Westetn Missouri as homesteaders. I was surprised that folks were stil homesteading this part of the country in the early chapters 1900's.
 
Throughout the 19th century, they seem to have moved around quite a bit, Indiana and Kentuck y and Missouri and Arkansas being primary places where they roamed.
 
This area splits fairly evenly between Baptist, Methodists, & Campbellites, significant #'s of Mennonite/Amish, with smaller tributaries of Restorationist LDS groups and Pentecostals.
 
My maternal grandmother's side hasn't had genealogy done so thoroughly. I don't know what religious tradition that wing tended to give loyalty to. I am thinking they were mainly Baptist, but Methodist-Episcopal might be as well.
 
She was from dirt-poor  Ozark Mountain and Appalachian roots so it may be harder to track down her roots. There may be fewer written records.
 
My Aunt has done a lot of the work on my paternal side. And, she was much more well organized and systematic. I will have to contact her to ask for copies of the stuff she has done. But it should be easier to sift through.
 
If I elect to return to the LDS, I will have a heck of a lot of work to do on my maternal side to put all the mess together into a coherent family tree. But a whole lot of the legwork is done.
 
Anyone else have intersting talea to tell from their family genealogical work?

I found Hugenots, Puritans, Quakers, Anglicans, Catholics and far enough back, pagans. Closer to the present, one of my grandparent's family were Swedish Lutherans who converted to Mormonism and migrated to Murray, UT, and lived on a road that was all Swedish immigrants.  Most came from the British Isles, many from Durham.

The 1830's converts were from NY and Massachusetts. One man died at winter quarters, leaving several wives and many children to travel to Utah.  But they were not without support. My direct female ancestor remarried almost immediately, again into a polygamous marriage.  The children from her dead husband were taken in by various families, including her oldest, married children, taking in the youngest. The remarried widow lived many more years and had more children with her new husband  

Then there is her son, who had three wives, who were sisters. There's lots of family stories about this family. When I was a kid we went to a family reunion, for the descendants of this family. The thing that stood out to me the most was that we wore nametags, where we wrote our own names and the name of the woman we are descended from. Her name was passed down for three generations, one of my great aunts, who I remember, was named after her grandmother, who was one of the three sisters married to the same man.

With all those polygamous families, all those kids and remarriages of women, and step siblings, we can hardly throw a rock in SLC,  central and northern Utah, without hitting someone that we're not distantly related to.

In central Utah, there were two families where the children in each family married the children of the other family, like a seven brides for seven brothers kind of thing  

I also took an interest in occupations and found shipwrights (8 generations of those), innkeepers, farmers, fishermen, town settlers/leaders, ranchers, a falconer, midwife, and my favorite "good wife", aka Goody. 

Edited by saemo
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On April 5, 2016 at 0:49 AM, Stargazer said:

Pocahontas is my 11th or 12th great grandmother.  Apparently I am also descended from about 5 Roman emperors.

I discovered last year that i'm related to one of the Louis kings of France (I want to say 13th but i might be remembering that wrong).  Kind of fun.

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On April 3, 2016 at 0:10 PM, Okrahomer said:

I indicated on the DNA thread that most of my ancestors come from the British Isles.  Genealogical records indicate that most of these were servant-class Anglicans.  Several of these lines left England in the 1850's after joining the LDS Church and heeding the call to "gather to Zion."  One of my widowed 2nd Great-grandmothers crossed the plains with six small children in the first Mormon handcart company.

i also have family lines whose history in America goes back to the pre-Revolutionary War era.  These folks seem to have belonged to a variety of the Protestant religions that were prevalent in the Northeastern U.S.  One set of 2nd great-grandparents joined the LDS Church in the 1850's at the height of the anti-Mormon-anti-polygamy sentiment that resulted in Johnston's Army and the Utah War.  They finally came to Utah in 1861 and settled first on the Virgin River near present-day Mesquite, Nevada.  I found them on a census record which lists their occupation as "fishing."  Having visited both green and fertile New Jersey as well as the stark and inhospitable region around Mesquite, I have often asked myself if they had been at all disappointed in their new situation.  I can't imagine that they weren't; but then there is this from my 2nd great-grandmother:


"I had never sat on any but soft cushioned chairs and since have sat on nail kegs, but I have never regretted coming to Utah."

One of my great great grandparents married after he deserted from Johnston's army, and converted to Mormonism. 

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Family lore is that an immigrant from England, in the early 1600s, was from an old royal family. Years ago when I had an ancestry.com account, I could not verify this link. It very well could be that a link from one generation to the next is in error. But if it were valid, once you get your line hooked into European royalty, you become descended from boat loads of royalty, all the way to Charlamagne, into every European country.  In one case, the line went back nearly a 1000 years, into Norse mythology.  Like saying we're descended from Arthur and Guenevire. 

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I'm doing something rather interesting. Our ward is one of three that is doing a pilot program of zoning. The Church has access to millions of newspapers starting in the early 1900s, which have been digitized, the pages have been word search for deaths, obituaries,  memorials, killed, died, born, birth, married, wedding, anniversary etc. A page will appear and I read through it, zoning by click and dragging over the article which contain deaths, births and marriages. Sometimes someone has killed someone or someone died in a car crash, just as long as it has a name and a date I circle it. This then will go to name extractors who will cull through them getting the names and dates. All of this will be made available to people doing their research so the can find their great grandmother's birth announcement or how uncle Bob murdered aunt Sally.  

It's been interesting reading the old headlines, everything from rum running and two world wars. I zoned Lawrence of Arabia's obituary, real name was Thomas Edward Lawrence, he died in May of 1935 in a motorcycle crash, he was trying to avoiding two young boys.     

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On April 7, 2016 at 11:30 PM, saemo said:

One of my great great grandparents married after he deserted from Johnston's army, and converted to Mormonism. 

I had never considered that there were conversions from among the soldiers.  Did meeting your great great grandmother play a role in that, or did he convert on his own?

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11 hours ago, Okrahomer said:

I had never considered that there were conversions from among the soldiers.  Did meeting your great great grandmother play a role in that, or did he convert on his own?

I don't know. 

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 While reading my husband's great Grandfathers Levi Jackman journal I ran across a name I thought sound familiar, Thomas Rhoads. Took a few minuets but then I remembered Rhoads was my sister in-laws maiden name. Sure enough Thomas was her great great grandfather. So my husband's great great grandfather helped baptized my sister in-laws great great Grandfather.  

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This is a fun website; RELATIVE FINDER    www.relativefinder.org/#/main

You can find your long lost cousin, Obama is an my 11th 2 times removed, go figure that one. You can if someone in your ward has set it up find who you are related to in the ward. I found I was sitting next to my hubby's 3rd cousin and one of the brothers and I now give each others hi-fives and say hi cousin, he's my 9th.   

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My dad brother and two uncles fought for Germany in WW2, all three survived, 2 were POW's, one in Russia and came back, one worked in a coal mine in Siberia or something. Anyways the one uncle was a German Communist prior to the war and was rounded and put in a camp. At some point in the war the MPs came to him and said because he was a national he could either stay here or fight in the war and he chose to fight. So he went to Russia and was involved the ward there. Either his wife died or something ( I can't recall now and my dad's asleep) but he was allowed to come home but while in Russia he became disillusioned with communism and gave it up. So at home he did his thing and went back to Russia, while he and others were on their way the German MPs caught up to their train and haphazardly selected guys to fight in the Western front and he got picked. So, he went to the Western front. he and others came to some kind of a camp and were told where to find their unit. So they went to find their unit and on the way got captured by the Yanks and he was sent to the US to be another prison camp. So, the war for him was losing his wife, not being a communist and getting captured twice by both sides of the conflict

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