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Hip Surgery...tell me abt recovery please


Calm

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Trying to project Mom's needs if we can talk her into hip surgery, doctor described minimum needed and I am sure his assistant when we decide to move forward will be most helpful, but if I can tell Mom "my friend had this happen" or "my friend's wife..." it means more to her than just quoting stats and medical info.  Want to hear bad stuff too so we don't push her too hard if it is more iffy than the doctor described it...though her hip is completely shot and she puts her pain level at 7 out of 10---last being unbearable---and this pain is constant, it is interfering with sleep, pretty much her whole life is self care with occasional family visits so not very meaningful to her right now.  However, structural health is excellent in the sense of healthy heart, clear arteries, no damaged organs though she has always had quality of life issues due to being physically weak even with extensive exercise, low energy stuff and long life in the family so she could last another decade (she is 85).  And now that Dad is not around, if only she felt good enough she could do some stuff she was always putting off...like going to the temple, some painting and writing.

She has had bad experiences with surgeries in the past (70s and earlier, kept herself from needing treatment sincethen through exercise and nutrition and relies on alternative stuff and believes it helps...but if it does, there is no way it can do enough now), so she has put off the suggestion forever though my dad jumped to get his knee done and that went well.  I don't see any other option besides too much suffering at this piint though.

Thus info would be greatly appreciated even if it is thirdhand (I will rely on medical stats etc., this is to help me give it a personal touch).

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9 minutes ago, Calm said:

Trying to project Mom's needs if we can talk her into hip surgery, doctor described minimum needed and I am sure his assistant when we decide to move forward will be most helpful, but if I can tell Mom "my friend had this happen" or "my friend's wife..." it means more to her than just quoting stats and medical info.  Want to hear bad stuff too so we don't push her too hard if it is more iffy than the doctor described it...though her hip is completely shot and she puts her pain level at 7 out of 10---last being unbearable---and this pain is constant, it is interfering with sleep, pretty much her whole life is self care with occasional family visits so not very meaningful to her right now.  However, structural health is excellent in the sense of healthy heart, clear arteries, no damaged organs though she has always had quality of life issues due to being physically weak even with extensive exercise, low energy stuff and long life in the family so she could last another decade (she is 85).  And now that Dad is not around, if only she felt good enough she could do some stuff she was always putting off...like going to the temple, some painting and writing.

She has had bad experiences with surgeries in the past (70s and earlier, kept herself from needing treatment sincethen through exercise and nutrition and relies on alternative stuff and believes it helps...but if it does, there is no way it can do enough now), so she has put off the suggestion forever though my dad jumped to get his knee done and that went well.  I don't see any other option besides too much suffering at this piint though.

Thus info would be greatly appreciated even if it is thirdhand (I will rely on medical stats etc., this is to help me give it a personal touch).

I have heard it is much like knee surgery, A little rough rehabbing but well worth it when done.

Edited by ERayR
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22 minutes ago, Calm said:

Trying to project Mom's needs if we can talk her into hip surgery, doctor described minimum needed and I am sure his assistant when we decide to move forward will be most helpful, but if I can tell Mom "my friend had this happen" or "my friend's wife..." it means more to her than just quoting stats and medical info.  Want to hear bad stuff too so we don't push her too hard if it is more iffy than the doctor described it...though her hip is completely shot and she puts her pain level at 7 out of 10---last being unbearable---and this pain is constant, it is interfering with sleep, pretty much her whole life is self care with occasional family visits so not very meaningful to her right now.  However, structural health is excellent in the sense of healthy heart, clear arteries, no damaged organs though she has always had quality of life issues due to being physically weak even with extensive exercise, low energy stuff and long life in the family so she could last another decade (she is 85).  And now that Dad is not around, if only she felt good enough she could do some stuff she was always putting off...like going to the temple, some painting and writing.

She has had bad experiences with surgeries in the past (70s and earlier, kept herself from needing treatment sincethen through exercise and nutrition and relies on alternative stuff and believes it helps...but if it does, there is no way it can do enough now), so she has put off the suggestion forever though my dad jumped to get his knee done and that went well.  I don't see any other option besides too much suffering at this piint though.

Thus info would be greatly appreciated even if it is thirdhand (I will rely on medical stats etc., this is to help me give it a personal touch).

My brother had a hip joint replacement within the last couple of months, claims he was up walking in a day or two and almost back to normal after a few days.  But he may exaggerate a little.  I can get you in touch with him if you wish.  He is a dedicated LDS person, ex bishop , lives in Syrause.  You'll probably feel comfortable talking to him. 

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Definitely go for it. Long-term it will not only help mobility but longevity. The most important thing post surgery is probably physiotherapy. An electric massager and maybe an exercise band to get muscles moving again as soon as conveniently possible (don't rush into it days after surgery) will help speed both recovery and overall health.

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My mother is 89.  She had a hip replacement 5 years ago.  Her doctor had recommended she have the replacement as early as 5 years before she finally did it.  I was there when they first got her up following her surgery, and I was amazed at how well she did.  My recollection is that the biggest challenge--the thing that kept her in the hospital a couple of days longer than initially expected--was having her successfully climb a small set of stairs.  A year after her replacement, she started telling the family that she regretted having waited so long to get it done.

 

Edited by Okrahomer
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My dad was 80 when he broke his hip in a fall and had an emergency hip replacement.  The surgery was fine and he recovered well, though slowly (he never reacts well to anaesthetic).  Like any op, after the first few days, when they took him off the heavy pain meds, he was in some pain but it was bearable, except for the first few days when he was moved.  But they do try to get people moving quickly.  As i said, my dad was out of it for several days because of his reaction to the anaesthetic and this probably did not help in getting him moving and reducing his pain level.  And I'm sure that it didn't help that he didn't expect it and wasn't prepared for it.  It took him a week to get on his feet.  I also agree with Halconero.  Dad did not have physiotherapy (he stubbornly refused) and so he still has a limp, it also took him 6 months to stop needing a walker or other aid when walking.  Physio is vital.  My grandfather had both hips replaced when he was in his 80's (this was 25 years ago, he has passed away now!), and he did much better - he even walked up Ben Nevis!  He did the physio! And his ops were scheduled.  He lived to 95 and never had any trouble with his hips/walking.

 

Edited by sheilauk
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19 minutes ago, sheilauk said:

 Dad did not have physiotherapy (he stubbornly refused) and so he still has a limp, it also took him 6 months to stop needing a walker or other aid when walking.  Physio is vital.  My grandfather had both hips replaced when he was in his 80's (this was 25 years ago, he has passed away now!), and he did much better - he even walked up Ben Nevis!  He did the physio! And his ops were scheduled.  He lived to 95 and never had any trouble with his hips/walking.

 

I agree... physical therapy after my knee replacement was vital.  I was told it would take 8 to 10 weeks really feel good... the first month or so I felt pain and would call my doc and he'd tell me to be patient... even took x-rays twice just to be sure all was normal... it was... so I continued with physical therapy, etc., but had almost resigned myself that I was never going to be "right."  A few weeks later everything just seemed to fall into place and the pain went away... I'm fine today, but my gait has changed somewhat, and sometimes when I sit somewhere for a while the knee will stiffen but that quickly goes away as soon as I'm up and moving...

Sheilauk... I notice you are from Nottingham... I've been to Nottingham... and love the Cottswold country.  My dh and I were fascinated at the villages and how they didn't have supermarkets like we do, but these wonderful little separate stores... like the bakery where we'd buy these wonderful rolls/muffins... then go to the green grocers and buy apples and we'd enjoy these as we drove along...

GG

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4 minutes ago, Garden Girl said:

Sheilauk... I notice you are from Nottingham... I've been to Nottingham... and love the Cottswold country.  My dh and I were fascinated at the villages and how they didn't have supermarkets like we do, but these wonderful little separate stores... like the bakery where we'd buy these wonderful rolls/muffins... then go to the green grocers and buy apples and we'd enjoy these as we drove along...

GG

Cool!  For a city, Nottingham is pleasant.  I live in a small town nearby.  The Cotswolds are beautiful.  When did you visit?  Sadly, even in the Cotswold villages, many of those little stores are closing as the big supermarkets move in with smaller versions and as people drive to out of town hyper markets.

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4 hours ago, sheilauk said:

Cool!  For a city, Nottingham is pleasant.  I live in a small town nearby.  The Cotswolds are beautiful.  When did you visit?  Sadly, even in the Cotswold villages, many of those little stores are closing as the big supermarkets move in with smaller versions and as people drive to out of town hyper markets.

We visited in 1986... Broadway... Stow-on-the-Wold... Stratford-on-Avon... Nottingham... and a couple more whose names I can't remember, but that had the quaint thatched roofs, etc. We visited Oxford, etc. We had three weeks, which was not nearly enough... but we loved our trip... One afternoon I was in my home in San Fran, and the next I was visiting Piccadilly Circus.  We spent our first three days sightseeing in London, then rented a car (that was an experience driving) and headed out.  Visited Wales, took the ferry across to Ireland (Blarney's Castle), came back and headed up to northern Wales, across to Scotland (stayed at St. Andrews and hubby played the Old Course while I shopped in town).  Back down through the Cotswold country, ending in London for our last two days... and home to San Francisco.  What beautiful countries!  What a time we had...

 Even though my knee surgery was a success and I had an excellent surgeon (Sports Medicine surgeon for two prof teams), and  my pain is gone, it's somewhat difficult to travel or walk long distances... So Cal, even if your mom's hip surgery is a success and her pain relieved... she might still have some minor discomfort... 

GG

 

Edited by Garden Girl
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3 minutes ago, Garden Girl said:

We visited... Broadway... Stow-on-the-Wold... Stratford-on-Avon... Nottingham... and a couple more whose names I can't remember, but that had the quaint thatched roofs, etc. We visited Oxford, etc. We had three weeks, which was not nearly enough... but we loved our trip... One afternoon I was in my home in San Fran, and the next I was visiting Piccadilly Circus.  We spent our first three days sightseeing in London, then rented a car (that was an experience driving) and headed out.  Visited Wales, took the ferry across to Ireland (Blarney's Castle), came back and headed up to northern Wales, across to Scotland (stayed at St. Andrews and hubby played the Old Course while I shopped in town).  Back down through the Cotswold country, ending in London for our last two days... and home to San Francisco.  What beautiful countries!  What a time we had...

 

Wow!  That is a lot of travelling in a short space of time!  I've been to the US a number of times and also tried to do as much as I could while there.  I understand the driving experience.  I have not yet had the courage to drive in the US!  I'm glad that you enjoyed your trip.  I've been to San Fran and have always enjoyed my trips in the US.

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Anything to do with bone or joints spells pain. If it is a replacement it is so worth it. I have know so many who got hip or knee replacements, who said it changed their lives. Hope all go's well with your Mother, I will keep her in my prayers.

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Something worth looking into might be a pool membership, or even better a pool exercise program in the shallows. No risk of falling, easy on the joints and back, but gets the musculoskeletal system engaged. Also, if it's an exercise group there is the added bonus of them usually being pretty social, which is also good for happiness and longevity.

Something I've come to realize is that longevity doesn't just mean length of life but quality of it as well. I knew two men in my ward, one who lived to 92 and the other 98. The former died a bit sooner, but he was largely independent, sharp, and able-bodied due to his stretching and exercise routine, good diet, and his joining of a crocheting group with other people. The latter may have lived a bit longer, but I can't say the physical quality of life was any good. I won't go into detail, but the last 15 years of his life were not the prettiest.

Edited by halconero
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  • 4 weeks later...

Surgery went fine today.  She was terrified when they told her she needed to get up and walk, but managed just fine.  Waited too long to get pain meds, but only a half an hour so not too bad and hopefully now she knows the signs so will ask for them when needed rather than delaying.  It is starting to sink in that maybe the awfulness that she has been going through the past few years of constant pain may be past.  I am getting excited to see how much improvement there will be.  Obviously right now it is the morphine, so I am trying not to set my expectations too high.

Thanks for all the input.  Much less anxiety getting here than I expected all around.  Hearing all the positive stories helped.

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I second the fact that PT is absolutely vital. Our GGma was too stubborn and her hip never really healed right and she blamed everyone but herself.  My mother on the other hand, toughed it out and went to PT and was very very happy.   I hope your parent gets the right kind of assistance to heal well!

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If it runs into a problem, it will be the first time in her life.  She is a devotee of exercise and was even riding her exercise bike the day before the surgery.  She believes in movement.

It is me who needs the scolding, lol.

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On 3/8/2016 at 10:53 PM, Calm said:

Surgery went fine today.  She was terrified when they told her she needed to get up and walk, but managed just fine.  Waited too long to get pain meds, but only a half an hour so not too bad and hopefully now she knows the signs so will ask for them when needed rather than delaying.  It is starting to sink in that maybe the awfulness that she has been going through the past few years of constant pain may be past.  I am getting excited to see how much improvement there will be.  Obviously right now it is the morphine, so I am trying not to set my expectations too high.

Thanks for all the input.  Much less anxiety getting here than I expected all around.  Hearing all the positive stories helped.

I know four people who went through this, and you are right to be excited about improvement, with every person it's been a transformation in their daily lives.  I'm sorry about the narcotic thing and get it, I've never been good with anything administered for pain, off the bat, too much and I will vomit for hours, a dose that hits the spot between throwing up and not being in agony usually leaves me with nightmares and crying jags.  I'm an awful patient.

I'm glad to see things are going well and you are upbeat, it's good for both of you. 

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I don't want to sound glib here, but my mom had Alzheimer's, as some here might know, and she fell in the care center on some uneven flooring and broke her hip.  She had hip replacement but never walked again.  She went downhill fast.  So maybe for Alzheimer's patients it's not a good outcome.  Calm, just hope your mom can look at the bright side and think, "hey I still have my mind".  I get upset about my MIL all the time.  She feels super lonely ever since her husband passed away a few months ago.  But we have a system where she gets visited each day except Sunday, but on that day she's invited to different families homes for dinner/games.  So pretty much every day is covered.  Sometimes I want to shake her and say how lucky she is.  My mother was robbed of her mind starting at 62 on.  But I feel stupid for my complaints too, and how some have it so much harder than myself, and understand she needs to grieve and I need to have empathy for that.  But still want to remind some elderly of situations like my mom, if they complain and still have their mind.   

 

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It would probably be hard to keep up with the exercises and the proper movements that the  older way of hip surgery required.  I am even having to constantly reinstruct Mom just on how to do her breathing exercises because nothing is taking at the moment.  Mom has been really spacey because of the drugs and pain (though if she is at all consistent with her usual rating, it is less than she is usually enduring save when she is sitting up or lying down, walking seems to be okay) and reminds me a bit of her mother, who had bad dementia.  And Mom's grandmother ended up in a mental institution, her dementia was so bad.  But I believe Mom can beat it becauseshe reads all the time and works her brain and is very careful with medication and nutrition,which her mother was not.  Still seeing her this way yesterday makes me feel so sad for those it happens to and praying it won't happen to her (and she has made it this far....about ten years past her mom's major signs showing up).  It can really rob life of joy.  

My sisterinlaw is being so kind and is making the move to the rehab with her because it might have been too early for me to be mobile myself as they couldn't give us a definite time...I am still in bed in fact milking the chance to rest to the extreme...I am hoping being out of a small box room with beige walls will perk her up.  Visitors are eager to come see her, so she will have plenty of mental stimulus while she is there.

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