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How Are Converts Really Viewed


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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

 

Thank you for your time.

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I am a little jealous at times. Got to wonder if I would have converted if I hadn't been born in the faith. Given how much the gospel impacted my grandparents, parents and my own life, I would be a completely different person...good chance if I had similar health issues, I would be dead by this time.

I don't see any difference in past worthiness or present in converts and BIC. We all have our struggles, I don't see how one can measure premortal life by what is going on now.

A faithful convert has had to generally work harder to get there so if one looks at it that way, it is more impressive. I don't because how can one compare one life to another, but if someone starts claiming BIC are somehow better, I would be sure and point that out to them.

Edited by calmoriah
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I'm leery of attempting to draw any specific cause-and-effect correlations with respect to what may or may not have happened in the premortal life.  I have a disability: "Master, who did sin, this man or his parents, that he was born prematurely and has Cerebral Palsy as a result?"  What was the Savior's answer when his disciples asked the same question about the blind man?  Did we exist as intelligences and then as spirits before being born into mortality?  Yes.  Did we have free will to make choices and grow (at least to a certain extent, though there would be a "ceiling" without a mortal experience) in that premortal life?  Yes.  Are at least some of the circumstances in which we find ourselves here in mortality affected by choices we made before coming here?  The most definitive answer we can give is, "Perhaps."  And, as I say, we certainly cannot draw any specific cause-and-effect relationships between possible premortal choices and mortal circumstances.

 

And my response to the notion that there could be anything like a second-class citizen in the Kingdom of God is succinct: :P

 

;)

 

Don't forget the Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard: Whether the laborers worked for an hour or for the whole day, they all were paid the same wage.

 

P.S.: My sister-in-law is a convert; she's one of the best Mormons I've ever known. :)

 

P.P.S.: John the Baptist had some pointed words for those of his day who, in their self-satisfied smugness, felt that their bloodlines would save them (in Matthew 3:9):

 

And think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, that God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham.

 

Edited by Kenngo1969
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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

 

Thank you for your time.

 

It is a big church. Someone somewhere has undoubtedly held that view. There are no sure indicators of PreMortal worthiness. I am sure some of the noble and great come into families that have long bloodlines in the church and others come to those whose families have never heard of it until the noble and great one shows up. I am sure there are PreMortal losers in both categories too.

 

I know enough about my PreMortality to know some decisions I made and have to make again. Some know more then me. Others know less. I trust God has reasons for all of these distinctions.

 

If we ever start comparing we are probably on the wrong path.

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As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

I'm a convert since 1966 and in all those years I never ever read or heartd anything like that. Where on earth did you find it?

It is total BS, in any case.

The first members of the Church in 1830 were converts, too. There were no members to be born to! The first president of the Church to be born in the Church was Joseph F. Smith, who became President in 1901. Was his successor, Lorenzo Snow, less faithful in the pre-existence because he wasn't born in the Church? Amazing notion.

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I'm a convert, just this year.

I look in the mirror and ask myself 'where have I been all my life'.

But as a convert of about 70 years of age said, he having converted at age 18, "it's never too late".

I'm sure many look at me and say "well, how long will he last.

I certainly do admire the many here in Los Angeles who were born into the faith and still my age, retirement age, and still going, still active, still enduring to the end.

I suppose tho', I do ask "were you born into the Church, when did you first come to the Church" but I never did ask, have you been active all those 30, 40 or 50 years since?

However, I frequently visit Utah, the south, the small towns, and I suppose it may have been easier for those people to stay with the church where everyone in the town was LDS and there isn't much else there but the little town. 

I suppose it's different in different places, tho' there are major similarities here and in Utah.  But in both areas they treat me real nice.

dc

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Everyone who was born into the church has some family member somewhere that was the first convert.  Mine isn't that far back in my family tree, though my husband is a convert so he gets to be ground zero on his side.  Neither of us is better than the other and i doubt it was any different in the premortal world.  :)

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I think of converts as courageous children of God, period.   Everyone comes from convert parents at some point.   Being born into families that trace back to the restoration doesn't guarantee even gospel knowledge, much less worthiness.    Yes, there are some tangible blessings from being raised in a truly righteous home, but those are found in many faiths, the only difference in LDS families is the clear understanding of the plan.

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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

 

Thank you for your time.

 

Hello Hikinggal (I like your name... I love hiking and being outdoors)

 

Where do people come up with such nonsense as those not born to LDS parents being less worthy in pre-mortal life?!!!  What you read is not true!  With things like that floating around, no wonder we are viewed by some as weird.   

And as far as being a convert hikinggal... everyone in the Church at some point has to be a "convert" if they are to be faithful Latter Day Saints, even those born in the Church.

 

Welcome to the board...

 

GG 

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Thank you all for your support and insight to my question.  I have been a convert for many years and have had nothing but kindness and love come my way, but once I read the comment concerning worthiness in the pre-mortal life I started to wonder.....  I guess we all doubt our own worthiness of the Gospel now and again.

 

Your answers were all very comforting.

 

Thank you all again!

 

Tam

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You're very welcome. I wish you continued happiness and fulfillment in your spiritual sojourn.

A brother in Christ,

Ken

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I was born in the church (actually it was a hospital), but I wasn't converted until I was 19 years old and serving a mission for the church. Everyone, whether baptized at 8 or 80 must have that moment sometime in their life when they are truly converted to the gospel. For some it might be one special spiritual expierence that does it or small moments of inspiration over a lifetime that changes their hearts to Jesus Christ.

You were not less valiant in the pre-mortal life. In fact we are told that those being born in these latter days were saved to come at this moment in time because of how valiant they were there. Those of us born in the church may have needed that extra advantage to help us get started.  But you didn't need it. You were fore-ordained in the premortal life to do great things in this dispensation of the gospel. If you haven't done it yet you might want to get a patriarchal blessing which can help you understand what your possibilities are for your life.

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1)  I fully agree with all those who state that we all must be converted at one point in time.  I hate it when at church people ask "converts" to stand.  I stand when they ask that, because even though I was BIC, I am a convert.  I think they need to ask instead who was introduced to and brought into the church through the full-time missionaries--IF they ask it at all...

 

2)  I think that the Lord may use stalwart, righteous spirits in the pre-mortal life in many ways.  Some are born into the church... but others are not... because the Lord knows that these individuals are so strong that they can handle the trials, struggles and persecution that will be heaped upon their heads for joining the church.  He uses them to form bridges to bring the gospel to peoples who might not otherwise have had access to the gospel message.  For instance, I have a friend who was born in Mainland China, where it is "un-Chinese" to even be Christian.  She joined the Church.  If she then shares the gospel with her family and Chinese/Asian friends, she is building the Kingdom in a way that perhaps no other could do.  Is she less stalwart for having been born in China?  No, she is (at least in my eyes) more so for having the courage to stand up to almost insurmountable odds.

~Caro

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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

 

Thank you for your time.

I have lived in a lot of wards/branches, I have never heard of this before.  

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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

 

Thank you for your time.

 

My family was converted to the gospel.  However, I was only seven at the time my mom and three older siblings were baptized; my father never joined the church.  I have lived in numerous parts of the world and have never felt any difference between those who have been recently baptized and those families that have been members for more than one generation. 

 

As I write this I do recall an odd feeling when my wife and I were living in Utah during our college days.  I remember feeling then that there was a difference between those that had the family names mentioned in the Doctrine & Covenants and everyone else.   I think this was not a religious or church action, but a cultural issue in the small town where we were living next to Provo.  Given that I have never experienced anything similar anywhere else in the Church I have put this experience in the box that reads:  We were a young, transient couple in a family ward with long time members.  There are a lot of reasons why we may have felt different as newlyweds.  The experience probably had more to say about me than about the congregation. 

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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

I have a deep respect for those who humbly find their way to the church.

 

And I have never heard anyone claim that being born outside of the church was due to being less worthy before this life. I would be interested to know where you read anything to the contrary.

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A majority of members are converts. 

And those that are not will fall away.

 

Even my BIC self had to convert.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A convert has a slight advantage IMHO of having experience of what the outside world is like, so I can see it as more of a blessing than a curse.

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I was a convert due to the fact my parents weren't Mormons.  Hee hee.

 

I've been told everything from "Converts are the life blood of the church" to, "I can't date you because you are not a returned missionary".  One guy claimed that only those born in the covenant have tears when they bear their testimony.  

 

At large I've been treated very well as a convert.  I like dark suits and short haircuts so when I was younger I was often accused of being an Elder.  

 

K

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Thank you for all of your heart felt answers.  My mom converted when I was around six.  Maybe it was because I was so young or it was just meant to be but I always felt that I was at home in the church.  Even when my mother stopped going to church I tried to go as often as I could.  As I got older I was became inactive, but I always felt the Gospel and the Church has my true home.  Now, that I am older I am needing (in an almost urgent way) to be an active member again.  

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Thank you for all of your heart felt answers.  My mom converted when I was around six.  Maybe it was because I was so young or it was just meant to be but I always felt that I was at home in the church.  Even when my mother stopped going to church I tried to go as often as I could.  As I got older I was became inactive, but I always felt the Gospel and the Church has my true home.  Now, that I am older I am needing (in an almost urgent way) to be an active member again.  

 

Well Hikinggal... most areas have wards or branches of the Church... all you need do is look in your local telephone directory (or you can go online) and find the nearest LDS ward in your area... and start to attend.  Set an appt with the bishop to talk with him, and then go in and explain where you are at this point and what you want to do... When I was inactive, I would get these promptings to return to Church, and finally I simply did... that was just about 20 years ago and I've never looked back... the blessings realized have been wonderful.  You feel the need to be active again?  Then just do it... and don't let anything dissuade you...

 

GG

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Greetings,

 

As a convert to the church I am wondering how those born in the faith generally feel toward converts.  I read once that it is the belief that those not born to LDS parents must have been less then worthy in the pre-mortal life.  Personally I have never felt slighted, but I can not help wondering.

 

Thank you for your time.

Lifetime members usually divide converts into three categories:

1) nerd converts

2) dork converts

3) twit converts.

I have been told by several lifetime members that I fit snugly into the "dork convert" category. I used to be insulted when lifetime members catagonized me this way but now I wear the label of "dork convert" as a badge of honor.

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Lifetime members usually divide converts into three categories:

1) nerd converts

2) dork converts

3) twit converts.

I have been told by several lifetime members that I fit snugly into the "dork convert" category. I used to be insulted when lifetime members catagonized me this way but now I wear the label of "dork convert" as a badge of honor.

Wow, what part of the world are you from? Never heard of these labels put on converts, is it a common thing? I'm from Utah, so I know very few converts.
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Lifetime members usually divide converts into three categories:

1) nerd converts

2) dork converts

3) twit converts.

I have been told by several lifetime members that I fit snugly into the "dork convert" category. I used to be insulted when lifetime members catagonized me this way but now I wear the label of "dork convert" as a badge of honor.

 

Wow, Bobbieaware... I've never heard of such insensitive, idiotic tripe as you state here... and how dare you make such a disgusting sweeping generalization that "Lifetime members usually divide converts into three categories."  I agree with Tacenda... what part of the world do you come from... I'm a lifetime member and would never refer to converts so callously, and don't know anyone else that would... absolutely no one I know (and I'm 74 yrs old) has or would do so... 

If those you know who do this are kidding... it ain't funny... and I cringe that non-members reading your post would actually believe such unChristlike, insulting nonsense...

 

GG

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