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Should You Pay Tithing On Inheritance Money?


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Let's say you inherit money from a deceased relative, or get a check for your birthday. Do you pay tithing on these?

 

10% of your interest.  Did you have it before?  Is it an increase to you?  I will not attempt to answer these questions for you but you will probably get a potpourri of answers.

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A 1970 letter from the First Presidency stated that, notwithstanding the fact that members should pay one-tenth of their income, "every member of the Church is entitled to make his own decision as to what he thinks he owes the Lord and to make payment accordingly" (Mar. 19, 1970; Doxey, Roy W. Tithing: The Lord's Law. Salt Lake City, 1976).

 

Tithing from money earned from a profession is a no-brainer. There are other ways we can obtain income and it is between us and God as to what we should pay tithing on. No one can tell you what to do. 

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Let's say you inherit money from a deceased relative, or get a check for your birthday. Do you pay tithing on these?

 

 

No.  Not if they were a tithe-payer themselves.  Same thing with tax refunds.  Tithing has already been paid.

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No.  Not if they were a tithe-payer themselves.  Same thing with tax refunds.  Tithing has already been paid.

Of course this can only be your own personal opinion. I agree with tax refunds on your own income you already paid tithing on, but money from an inheritance was never your own money to begin with so I would pay tithing on it. Just my opinion. We are blessed according to how faithfully we live the principle or even go beyond living the principle.

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Of course this can only be your own personal opinion. I agree with tax refunds on your own income you already paid tithing on, but money from an inheritance was never your own money to begin with so I would pay tithing on it. Just my opinion. We are blessed according to how faithfully we live the principle or even go beyond living the principle.

 

What else can I offer but my own opinion?

 

Is money not owned -- collectively -- by the family?  In my family it isn't my money or my wife's money.  It is our money.  Why would a son pay tithing on what is already his?  Inheritance is simply assuming responsibility for assets that are already yours to have.

Edited by sethpayne
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No.  Not if they were a tithe-payer themselves.  Same thing with tax refunds.  Tithing has already been paid.

 

What has someone elses tithing status have to do with whether you pay tithing or not? 

 

Tax refunds.  Depends on rather you originally paid on net or gross.

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What has someone elses tithing status have to do with whether you pay tithing or not? 

 

Tax refunds.  Depends on rather you originally paid on net or gross.

 

Because the Lord doesn't expect to get paid twice on the same income.  He's not running some scheme.

Edited by sethpayne
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Because the Lord doesn't expect to get paid twice on the same income.  He's not running some scheme.

 

See post # 6 above.  Nope he is not but it is a test of where your priorities are.  That is why it is an individual choice.

 

I fix the bishops car and he pays me my exorbitant fees with money I know he has paid tithing on so I don't have to worry about paying tithing on that money because it has already been tithed?  OK sounds good to me.  Not.

Edited by ERayR
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It's money I didn't have yesterday. I got a $400 check for my birthday today. Happy birthday to me. And I'm wondering if I should give $40 of it to the church.

Is tithing only to be paid on money? There was a time when money was scarce, but commodities were not (for farmers). If a farmer's chickens laid 100 eggs that week, 10 of those eggs (the best ones, mind you) would be given to the bishop for tithing. It was then the job of the Tithing Office to convert the received commodities to cash.

What if someone gives you a book for your birthday? Do you ask them how much they paid and then give 10% of that to the bishop? The thing is, I am sure you do not. You are paying tithing on your increase -- or in other words, your return for your labor or profit from the use of your capital. A birthday gift isn't increase. But I would say that while I don't think it is a requirement to pay tithing on a cash gift or inheritance, one might do so anyway, if the Spirit directed you.

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I fix the bishops car and he pays me my exorbitant fees with money I know he has paid tithing on so I don't have to worry about paying tithing on that money because it has already been tithed?  OK sounds good to me.  Not.

 

What are you talking about?  Money PAID to you for services rendered is clearly an increase.  Money that is your families simply transferred to you via inheritance is not an increase.  

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So instead of telling the OP what to do, perhaps we should just say what we would do and how we arrived at that decision.

 

I have paid on inheritances  (I did not pay on the personal property I inherited that I didn't sell), and birthday gifts of money, and garden produce (the value that is more than I paid to create the crop).

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What has someone elses tithing status have to do with whether you pay tithing or not?

Tax refunds. Depends on rather you originally paid on net or gross.

Paying tithing in Tax refunds also depends on whether you get a refund in excess to your tax payments.

Earned income tax credits and other deductions can result people receiving tax returns substantially greater than taxes paid.

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I fix the bishops car and he pays me my exorbitant fees with money I know he has paid tithing on so I don't have to worry about paying tithing on that money because it has already been tithed? OK sounds good to me. Not.

When you pay tithing on money received from the bishop for work rendered on his aging automobile do you pay tithing on the full amount he pays you?

Or do you deduct the cost of the materials from monies received before calculating tithing?

What about other overhead? Do you deduct the cost of your shop space, tools, utilities etc?

In most circumstances small businesses deduct most overhead before paying the "increase" to the business owner.

Should such a business owner actually pay tithe gross receipts? What are your thoughts?

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So instead of telling the OP what to do, perhaps we should just say what we would do and how we arrived at that decision.

I have paid on inheritances (I did not pay on the personal property I inherited that I didn't sell), and birthday gifts of money, and garden produce (the value that is more than I paid to create the crop).

I pay of gross. I do not pay on tax returns.

I am also a small business owner and can have some personal home expenses paid through the business. I have often thought about whether I should calculate tithe on this.

I am a tax resident of Vermont.

There is a real ambiguity on the term increase. It is a term that predates current economic structures and formal pay structures most of is enjoy.

For a farmer an increase was the value derived (via either cash or barter) in excess of the value ultilized to create the crop. Some seasons farmers might have late gross sales but very slim margins only 5% or so. Paying tithe on the gross receipts would result in negative earnings. In this context it is clear what constitutes increase. Increase is the margin. A honest tithe payer would either give 10% of the crop or 10% of the 5% increase.

Working professionals do not seem to be given this option as readily. Even though I need to eat, have a home to stay in, cover my utilities and transportation in order to generate value from my salaried job (just as a farmer needs to purchase seed, fertilizer, irrigation, livestock and equipment in order to generate value from a farm) we do not seem to have an attitude in the church that one should deduct operational overhead from a professional lifestyle before we calculate our tithing.

Edited by Bikeemikey
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This is not directed at the OP but is my reaction to some of the responses (and discussions I have seen/heard elsewhere).....why do so many people search for reasons to decrease their tithing, rather than ways to increase their tithing?

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No.  Not if they were a tithe-payer themselves.  

 

I suggest that you think about that.

 

 

sethpayne, on 16 Aug 2014 - 6:01 PM, said:

 Money that is your families simply transferred to you via inheritance is not an increase.  

 

 I have learned thru life experiences that I should consider tithing a blessing to be maximized rather than a tax to be avoided.  

 

Anyway, If it is not an increase, then transfer it over to me.

Edited by cdowis
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Because the Lord doesn't expect to get paid twice on the same income.  He's not running some scheme.

 

And yet Church employees pay tithing on the money they earn.

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And yet Church employees pay tithing on the money they earn.

 

Yes, but the church itself is exempt from paying tithing.  Which brings up an interesting question, does a solely own church corporation pay tithing on its income?

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Yes, but the church itself is exempt from paying tithing.  Which brings up an interesting question, does a solely own church corporation pay tithing on its income?

I don't think so. Are you suggesting that Jesus pay tithing on church income?   IMO whatever the situation, tithing is meant for the individual member to help perfect us towards exaltation.

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I pondered this same thing last year when my wife died and I received a sizeable (to me) life insurance payment. My personal conclusion... No amount of money could begin to be an adequate compensation for her loss in my life and to our family. Thus, it was absolutely not an "increase."

It's not about finding ways to decrease tithing, but about paying the appropriate amount, which is a tenth. Tithing can be exactly a tenth, however one determines that, and one should be considered fully faithful as far as that goes and deserving of whatever blessing tithe payers are meant to receive, and IMO nobody should be wagging a finger at anyone who pays that exact tithe faithfully and accusing them of trying to "decrease their tithing." Where we are commanded to give extra from our hearts, repeatedly in the scriptures, is for charitable offerings to the poor and needy.

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I pay on what I earn through my own efforts. I do not pay tithing in birthday or Christmas gifts. If you separate the value out of the equation, I think the answer becomes rather easy. An inheritance is  gift so if you pay tithing on gifts then pay it on your inheritance. If not, then don't worry bout it. 

 

Tithing is not the only way to donate to the kingdom. If you receive a large endowment through no effort on your own part, you can always give a generous fast offering. I personally do not believe tithing is required.  

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Individuals have a range of their personal opinions when it comes to tithing.  Money does really weird things to people.

 

We are taught to pay 10% on our increase.  Some individuals are very strict and seek to pay 10% on what they view as an increase while others are a bit looser in their interpretation of an increase.

 

Do what you think is right in all things.  Have a talk with the Lord and then jointly make a decision and move on.  When you stand before the judgment seat of God I expect that none of these individuals will be standing with you; it is between you and the Lord.  Keep that way now and you will be able to look him in the eye and tell him you tried to do everything he commanded and what you thought he wanted you to do.  

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A 1970 letter from the First Presidency stated that, notwithstanding the fact that members should pay one-tenth of their income, "every member of the Church is entitled to make his own decision as to what he thinks he owes the Lord and to make payment accordingly" (Mar. 19, 1970; Doxey, Roy W. Tithing: The Lord's Law. Salt Lake City, 1976).

 

Tithing from money earned from a profession is a no-brainer. There are other ways we can obtain income and it is between us and God as to what we should pay tithing on. No one can tell you what to do. 

 

Also that "No one is justified in making any other statement than this." is also part of the letter.  Therefore it is none of our right to indicate what is appropriate or innapropriate.  It is completely out of our hands.  yet many of you still feel a need to impose your defintion.

 

It is interesting to note in the JST of Genesis 14:39 - Wherefore, Abram paid unto him tithes of all that he had, of all the riches which he possessed, which God had given him more than that which he had need.

 

It appears that Abraham paid tithing on his surplus.  Which would crash the LDS cultural cart

 

For your guidance in this matter, please be advised that we have uniformly replied that the simplest statement we know of is that statement of the Lord himself that the members of the Church should pay one-tenth of all their interest annually, which is understood to mean income. No one is justified in making any other statement than this. We feel that every member of the Church should be entitled to make his own decision as to what he thinks he owes the Lord, and to make payment accordingly.

Edited by DBMormon
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